VIDEOS: “International Conference of Governments and Social Movements “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” (21-22 July 2009, Paraguay)

Watch online the video recording from the International Conference of Governments and Social Movements “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises” held 21-22 July 2009 in Paraguay.

The Conference was organised as a series of round tables for dialogue bringing together parliamentarians, governments and civil society representatives from Latin America, seek Africa, Asia and Europe.

The objective of this International Conference was to advance the debate among governments, regional/international bodies, policy makers, parliamentarians and social movements from the four regions about the possibilities to respond to these crises through regional alternatives and a model of regional integration that promotes a change in the development model of the regions.


CONFERENCE INTRODUCTION
– Gonzalo Berron, ASC/CSA (Brasil)
– Brid Brennan, TNI/Peoples’ Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms, (Netherlands)
– Gustavo Codas, Presidencia Gobierno (Paraguay)

PANEL 1: SYSTEMIC CRISIS, IMPACTS OF THE CRISIS ON REGIONAL INTEGRATION PROCESSES

PANEL 2: REGIONAL RESPONSES TO THE CRISES

PANEL 3: REGIONAL INTEGRATION: RE-THINKING THE DEVELOPMENT MODEL. Complementarity versus competition. Integration and Asymmetries

PANEL 4: DEVELOPMENT MODEL AND INFRASTRUCTURE

PANEL 5: ENERGY CRISIS AND CLIMATE CHANGE: THE CHALLENGE TO FIND REGIONAL SOLUTIONS

PANEL 6: PRODUCTION MODEL AND FOOD SOVEREIGNTY

PANEL 7: FINANCES AND DEVELOPMENT MODEL: NEW REGIONAL FINANCIAL STRUCTURES

PANEL 8: REGIONAL PEACE, DEMOCRACY AND HUMAN RIGHTS

CLOSING PANEL: REGIONAL INTEGRATION: CHALLENGES FOR THE MOVEMENTS AND THE GOVERNMENTS

Statement from the organisers of the Asean People's Forum/Asean Civil Society Conference

The events of People’s SAARC in Kathmandu were organized from 23 to 25 March 2007 with an objective of strengthening the people’s solidarity in South Asia in tune with the vision and perspectives of an alternative model for political, social, economic, and cultural order that must ensure democracy, justice and peace for all in the region. Moreover, it aimed to strengthen people-to-people relationships in the region that would inaugurate a climate to revive the balance and harmony among the people. It should liquidate artificial and inhuman barriers that divide lands, people and minds, transcending all the boundaries.


Proceedings of People's SAARC cover sheet

Download PDF

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } A:link { color: #0000ff } –>

Jenina Joy Chavez / Focus on the Global South

 

(Presentation at the Conference on “Regional Integration: an Opportunity Presented by the Crisis”, Asuncion, for sale Paraguay, site July 21-22, 2009.)

 

 

What I will tackle this evening is an updated version of the notes I used for the Regional Integration: Opportunities to Face the Crisis conference in Asuncion, Paraguay, and the Philippine WS on ASEAN, earlier this year. There is no claim that regional responses are the only viable responses to the global crisis, but hopefully we would be able to determine if it is appropriate to study and consider them as part of the many options on alternates we can try.

 

Before the crisis, it has been projected that in about a decade, the South –that is, the developing countries – would account for more than half of the world income and more than 50% of global trade. It has been trumpeted all over that Asia together with other emerging economies would be the major growth drivers in the world economy, highlighting the relevance of South-South cooperation, particularly regional economic integration in Asia.

 

For Asia, at least, this claim has been put to the test with the onset of the global financial crisis that put into the spotlight the basic development paradigm deployed by what is considered the world over as prosperous Asia.

 

 

In terms of what has happened in the last year and a half, following are some observations on how Asia tried to respond to the crisis:

 

  • First, unlike what characterized how the North (particularly Western Europe and North America) responded to the crisis, Asia’s response does not include massive bailout packages to failing corporations, particularly ailing financial entities.

 

    • This highlights the differential manifestations of the crisis. While financialization is a global phenomenon, sparing no one and certainly not Asia, Asia still hosts one of the most robust productive capacity worldwide – that is, the real economy remains the most significant feature of Asia’s growth and development.

 

  • Second, in most countries, though, the immediate response was to address the liquidity crunch and the crisis of confidence, especially in the banking system. This included moves to increase deposit insurance coverage, and guarantees on deposit-taking institutions. As a result, massive bank runs have been avoided.

 

  • Third, from the initial liquidity crunch, economic slowdown became the norm. Hence, governments moved to address this by increasing liquidity and easing credit and monetary policy, including intervening in foreign exchange markets. Many state enterprises also increased their shareholdings in publicly-traded companies. The result – relative low interest rates.

 

  • Fourth, stimulus packages have at their center fiscal policy and public spending, although social sector spending has not received much attention.

 

    • Asian countries have devoted between less than ½ percent of GDP to their fiscal stimulus package to more than 9%.

    • Among the biggest packages are those of the following:

      • Singapore, $15B (6%)

      • Malaysia, $2B initially to $16B (9% of GDP)

      • China, $600B spread only over 2 years

    • Most of the stimulus packages have a central tax break or tax credit component, as well as capital spending, including re-capitalization of state-run banks, most notably in India.

 

  • Fifth, the Asian response has been centered around resiliency. That is, they are focused on minimizing unemployment and on creating employment opportunities

 

    • With programs like job credits or payouts to employers of up to 12% of salaries (Singapore)

    • Various skills upgrading and retraining programs

    • Welfare support to retrenched workers and returning overseas workers.

    • Such resiliency packages, though, highlighted some tensions inherent in the increasingly connected Asian economies and job markets.

      • For instance, part of Malaysia’s and Singapore’s response is to cut down or crackdown on migrant workers, a classic response to appease worker’s restiveness at home, and a blatant disregard to the ripple such moves might effect.

 

  • Sixth, at least the ASEAN+3 is trying to improve on a regional financial cooperation first introduced in 2000 as a response to the 97/98 Asian financial crisis.

    • The Chiang Mai Initiative is a collaboration to create a network of bilateral swap arrangements to manage short-term liquidity problems.

    • From $20B in 2000, it increased to $80B in 2008, and earlier this year was increased further to $120B.

    • Moreover, the swaps are being multilateralized, a step towards developing from a bilateral into a regional pool.

    • This is about the only such regional initiative in Asia. There is no equivalent for South Asia, or in West and Central Asia.

 

 

From these observations, several key questions emerge:

 

  • 1st: would Asia be able to export its way out of the crisis? Is it even proper to aim only for this?

 

  • 2nd:: would the regional integration vaunted to be necessary to solidify and further the growth in Asia be resorted to, or given life in practice, in the wake of this crisis?

 

  • 3rd: in the design of crisis response, what is Asia aiming for?

    • Is it just to recover previous levels of consumption and economic activity?

    • How much of the response is for immediate relief, extremely necessary at this time?

    • And how much of this response is for the long-term and tries to take advantage of converting the crisis into opportunity?

 

 

At this point, I would like to emphasize three points that interrogate what Asia has managed or not managed to do:

 

  • One, note that the responses now differ qualitatively from the responses Asia had a decade ago.

 

    • There is no IMF, not least because the IMF has gained notoriety and lost a lot of credibility because of how it bungled its job in the late 1990s.

    • Not only is there no IMF, the policy and programmatic responses of Asia have been antithesis to what the IMF formerly prescribed.

      • There was no interest cure that killed business; instead efforts were concentrated on preserving relative low interest rates (including intervention in the forex market).

      • There were many elements of direct transfers, subsidies, and re-capitalization; something the IMF would never do (at least before).

    • In short, the responses are not patently neoliberal.

 

  • Two, these responses have not warranted enough incentive towards a focus on internal demand, on the one hand, and on coordinated expanded demand regionally, on the other.

 

    • More pointedly, it is a concern that Asia should even set as its main objective the recovery and maintenance of consumption levels prior to the crisis.

    • We should not be overly concerned about trying to save what has been clearly a cause of failure. It is high time for Asia to draw from regional resources and invent something that will again set it apart – or, place it in cooperation with other regions trying to imagine things differently.

 

  • Three, there is concern that ASEAN+3 finds it difficult to make good on regional financial cooperation as designed through the Chiang Mai Initiative and related processes.

 

    • Take for instance, when South Korea got hit when the Lehman Brothers collapsed, it negotiated a $30B foreign exchange swap with the US Federal Reserve and not the ASEAN+3. (They came later.)

    • Despite increases in commitments, the CMI is still not functional, and the IMF still plays a role when countries tap the CMI for more than 20% of their requirement, detracting from the importance of financial as well policy autonomy for Asia.

 

 

There are certainly elements of response – some quite innovative or at least properly targeted – in Asia. The question is whether Asia is able to turn the crisis on its head, and be able to emerge with another unique contribution to development discourse as it has been known to have done in the past.

 

Moreover, we as civil society and social movements, in our interrogation of possible alternatives, esp. if we have little or no hold on power – the question of how to get that power either by holding political power ourselves or rallying massive constituencies on our side – is key.

 

The final set of points I wish to make has to do with the areas where regional response would be crucial:

 

  • One, the need to focus on internal demand and a more coordinated rationalization of regional demand.

 

    • There is need to re-imagine trade and production cooperation, where instead of competition, the prevailing principles would be cooperation, complementation and solidarity.

    • Such arrangement must address the issue of excess, and should have as outer limit some climate and ecological threshold.

 

  • Two, there is need to overhaul the financial architecture for Asia

 

    • Away from dependence on Northern currencies, esp. the American $

    • And towards the pooling of alternative sources of development finance

    • As well as appropriate surveillance and monitoring systems (without the IMF) that assist countries and build confidence that every one takes responsibility for regional financial stability

 

  • Three, there is need to strengthen regional stockpiling for food security

 

    • South Asia has better experience on this although technically Southeast Asia pledges bigger reserves

    • Away from trade logic and towards regional self-help and development of crisis response capabilities.

 

  • Four, there is need to re-imagine the public

 

    • It is time to talk about the public not only in the narrow confines of the State or the government, but also support different forms of provisioning that allowed communities to survive at a time that the State was neglecting them.

    • It must be recognized that such strength can be scaled up at the national and the regional level.

 

  • Five, whatever alternative we think of, resonance with the people is important.

 

    • We need to start where there is clear demand, and patent need, to make regional arrangements acceptable to the people

      • Migration

      • Rights and democracy

      • Decent living standards and environment

      • Ability to generate economic activity and distribute its fruits equitably

    • There is need to also work on something that works and shows results in the immediate even as the strategic alternative structures are still being constructed.

Jenina Joy Chavez / Focus on the Global South

 

(Presentation at the Conference on “Regional Integration: an Opportunity Presented by the Crisis”, diagnosis Asuncion, Paraguay, July 21-22, 2009.)

 

What I will tackle this evening is an updated version of the notes I used for the Regional Integration: Opportunities to Face the Crisis conference in Asuncion, Paraguay, and the Philippine WS on ASEAN, earlier this year. There is no claim that regional responses are the only viable responses to the global crisis, but hopefully we would be able to determine if it is appropriate to study and consider them as part of the many options on alternates we can try.

Before the crisis, it has been projected that in about a decade, the South –that is, the developing countries – would account for more than half of the world income and more than 50% of global trade. It has been trumpeted all over that Asia together with other emerging economies would be the major growth drivers in the world economy, highlighting the relevance of South-South cooperation, particularly regional economic integration in Asia.

For Asia, at least, this claim has been put to the test with the onset of the global financial crisis that put into the spotlight the basic development paradigm deployed by what is considered the world over as prosperous Asia.

In terms of what has happened in the last year and a half, following are some observations on how Asia tried to respond to the crisis:

First, unlike what characterized how the North (particularly Western Europe and North America) responded to the crisis, Asia’s response does not include massive bailout packages to failing corporations, particularly ailing financial entities.

This highlights the differential manifestations of the crisis. While financialization is a global phenomenon, sparing no one and certainly not Asia, Asia still hosts one of the most robust productive capacity worldwide – that is, the real economy remains the most significant feature of Asia’s growth and development.

Second, in most countries, though, the immediate response was to address the liquidity crunch and the crisis of confidence, especially in the banking system. This included moves to increase deposit insurance coverage, and guarantees on deposit-taking institutions. As a result, massive bank runs have been avoided.

Third, from the initial liquidity crunch, economic slowdown became the norm. Hence, governments moved to address this by increasing liquidity and easing credit and monetary policy, including intervening in foreign exchange markets. Many state enterprises also increased their shareholdings in publicly-traded companies. The result – relative low interest rates.

Fourth, stimulus packages have at their center fiscal policy and public spending, although social sector spending has not received much attention.

Asian countries have devoted between less than ½ percent of GDP to their fiscal stimulus package to more than 9%.

Among the biggest packages are those of the following:

      • Singapore, $15B (6%)
      • Malaysia, $2B initially to $16B (9% of GDP)
      • China, $600B spread only over 2 years

Most of the stimulus packages have a central tax break or tax credit component, as well as capital spending, including re-capitalization of state-run banks, most notably in India.

Fifth, the Asian response has been centered around resiliency. That is, they are focused on minimizing unemployment and on creating employment opportunities

With programs like job credits or payouts to employers of up to 12% of salaries (Singapore)

Various skills upgrading and retraining programs

Welfare support to retrenched workers and returning overseas workers.

Such resiliency packages, though, highlighted some tensions inherent in the increasingly connected Asian economies and job markets.

      • For instance, part of Malaysia’s and Singapore’s response is to cut down or crackdown on migrant workers, a classic response to appease worker’s restiveness at home, and a blatant disregard to the ripple such moves might effect.

Sixth, at least the ASEAN+3 is trying to improve on a regional financial cooperation first introduced in 2000 as a response to the 97/98 Asian financial crisis.

The Chiang Mai Initiative is a collaboration to create a network of bilateral swap arrangements to manage short-term liquidity problems.

From $20B in 2000, it increased to $80B in 2008, and earlier this year was increased further to $120B.

Moreover, the swaps are being multilateralized, a step towards developing from a bilateral into a regional pool.

This is about the only such regional initiative in Asia. There is no equivalent for South Asia, or in West and Central Asia.

From these observations, several key questions emerge:

1st: would Asia be able to export its way out of the crisis? Is it even proper to aim only for this?

2nd:: would the regional integration vaunted to be necessary to solidify and further the growth in Asia be resorted to, or given life in practice, in the wake of this crisis?

3rd: in the design of crisis response, what is Asia aiming for?

Is it just to recover previous levels of consumption and economic activity?

How much of the response is for immediate relief, extremely necessary at this time?

And how much of this response is for the long-term and tries to take advantage of converting the crisis into opportunity?

At this point, I would like to emphasize three points that interrogate what Asia has managed or not managed to do:

One, note that the responses now differ qualitatively from the responses Asia had a decade ago.

There is no IMF, not least because the IMF has gained notoriety and lost a lot of credibility because of how it bungled its job in the late 1990s.

Not only is there no IMF, the policy and programmatic responses of Asia have been antithesis to what the IMF formerly prescribed.

      • There was no interest cure that killed business; instead efforts were concentrated on preserving relative low interest rates (including intervention in the forex market).
      • There were many elements of direct transfers, subsidies, and re-capitalization; something the IMF would never do (at least before).

In short, the responses are not patently neoliberal.

Two, these responses have not warranted enough incentive towards a focus on internal demand, on the one hand, and on coordinated expanded demand regionally, on the other.

More pointedly, it is a concern that Asia should even set as its main objective the recovery and maintenance of consumption levels prior to the crisis.

We should not be overly concerned about trying to save what has been clearly a cause of failure. It is high time for Asia to draw from regional resources and invent something that will again set it apart – or, place it in cooperation with other regions trying to imagine things differently.

Three, there is concern that ASEAN+3 finds it difficult to make good on regional financial cooperation as designed through the Chiang Mai Initiative and related processes.

Take for instance, when South Korea got hit when the Lehman Brothers collapsed, it negotiated a $30B foreign exchange swap with the US Federal Reserve and not the ASEAN+3. (They came later.)

Despite increases in commitments, the CMI is still not functional, and the IMF still plays a role when countries tap the CMI for more than 20% of their requirement, detracting from the importance of financial as well policy autonomy for Asia.

There are certainly elements of response – some quite innovative or at least properly targeted – in Asia. The question is whether Asia is able to turn the crisis on its head, and be able to emerge with another unique contribution to development discourse as it has been known to have done in the past.

Moreover, we as civil society and social movements, in our interrogation of possible alternatives, esp. if we have little or no hold on power – the question of how to get that power either by holding political power ourselves or rallying massive constituencies on our side – is key.

The final set of points I wish to make has to do with the areas where regional response would be crucial:

One, the need to focus on internal demand and a more coordinated rationalization of regional demand.

There is need to re-imagine trade and production cooperation, where instead of competition, the prevailing principles would be cooperation, complementation and solidarity.

Such arrangement must address the issue of excess, and should have as outer limit some climate and ecological threshold.

Two, there is need to overhaul the financial architecture for Asia

Away from dependence on Northern currencies, esp. the American $

And towards the pooling of alternative sources of development finance

As well as appropriate surveillance and monitoring systems (without the IMF) that assist countries and build confidence that every one takes responsibility for regional financial stability

Three, there is need to strengthen regional stockpiling for food security

South Asia has better experience on this although technically Southeast Asia pledges bigger reserves

Away from trade logic and towards regional self-help and development of crisis response capabilities.

Four, there is need to re-imagine the public

It is time to talk about the public not only in the narrow confines of the State or the government, but also support different forms of provisioning that allowed communities to survive at a time that the State was neglecting them.

It must be recognized that such strength can be scaled up at the national and the regional level.

Five, whatever alternative we think of, resonance with the people is important.

We need to start where there is clear demand, and patent need, to make regional arrangements acceptable to the people

      • Migration
      • Rights and democracy
      • Decent living standards and environment
      • Ability to generate economic activity and distribute its fruits equitably

There is need to also work on something that works and shows results in the immediate even as the strategic alternative structures are still being constructed.


<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } A:link { color: #0000ff } –>

Jenina Joy Chavez / Focus on the Global South

 

(Presentation at the Conference on “Regional Integration: an Opportunity Presented by the Crisis”, online Asuncion, Paraguay, July 21-22, 2009.)

 

 

What I will tackle this evening is an updated version of the notes I used for the Regional Integration: Opportunities to Face the Crisis conference in Asuncion, Paraguay, and the Philippine WS on ASEAN, earlier this year. There is no claim that regional responses are the only viable responses to the global crisis, but hopefully we would be able to determine if it is appropriate to study and consider them as part of the many options on alternates we can try.

 

Before the crisis, it has been projected that in about a decade, the South –that is, the developing countries – would account for more than half of the world income and more than 50% of global trade. It has been trumpeted all over that Asia together with other emerging economies would be the major growth drivers in the world economy, highlighting the relevance of South-South cooperation, particularly regional economic integration in Asia.

 

For Asia, at least, this claim has been put to the test with the onset of the global financial crisis that put into the spotlight the basic development paradigm deployed by what is considered the world over as prosperous Asia.

 

 

In terms of what has happened in the last year and a half, following are some observations on how Asia tried to respond to the crisis:

 

  • First, unlike what characterized how the North (particularly Western Europe and North America) responded to the crisis, Asia’s response does not include massive bailout packages to failing corporations, particularly ailing financial entities.

 

    • This highlights the differential manifestations of the crisis. While financialization is a global phenomenon, sparing no one and certainly not Asia, Asia still hosts one of the most robust productive capacity worldwide – that is, the real economy remains the most significant feature of Asia’s growth and development.

 

  • Second, in most countries, though, the immediate response was to address the liquidity crunch and the crisis of confidence, especially in the banking system. This included moves to increase deposit insurance coverage, and guarantees on deposit-taking institutions. As a result, massive bank runs have been avoided.

 

  • Third, from the initial liquidity crunch, economic slowdown became the norm. Hence, governments moved to address this by increasing liquidity and easing credit and monetary policy, including intervening in foreign exchange markets. Many state enterprises also increased their shareholdings in publicly-traded companies. The result – relative low interest rates.

 

  • Fourth, stimulus packages have at their center fiscal policy and public spending, although social sector spending has not received much attention.

 

    • Asian countries have devoted between less than ½ percent of GDP to their fiscal stimulus package to more than 9%.

    • Among the biggest packages are those of the following:

      • Singapore, $15B (6%)

      • Malaysia, $2B initially to $16B (9% of GDP)

      • China, $600B spread only over 2 years

    • Most of the stimulus packages have a central tax break or tax credit component, as well as capital spending, including re-capitalization of state-run banks, most notably in India.

 

  • Fifth, the Asian response has been centered around resiliency. That is, they are focused on minimizing unemployment and on creating employment opportunities

 

    • With programs like job credits or payouts to employers of up to 12% of salaries (Singapore)

    • Various skills upgrading and retraining programs

    • Welfare support to retrenched workers and returning overseas workers.

    • Such resiliency packages, though, highlighted some tensions inherent in the increasingly connected Asian economies and job markets.

      • For instance, part of Malaysia’s and Singapore’s response is to cut down or crackdown on migrant workers, a classic response to appease worker’s restiveness at home, and a blatant disregard to the ripple such moves might effect.

 

  • Sixth, at least the ASEAN+3 is trying to improve on a regional financial cooperation first introduced in 2000 as a response to the 97/98 Asian financial crisis.

    • The Chiang Mai Initiative is a collaboration to create a network of bilateral swap arrangements to manage short-term liquidity problems.

    • From $20B in 2000, it increased to $80B in 2008, and earlier this year was increased further to $120B.

    • Moreover, the swaps are being multilateralized, a step towards developing from a bilateral into a regional pool.

    • This is about the only such regional initiative in Asia. There is no equivalent for South Asia, or in West and Central Asia.

 

 

From these observations, several key questions emerge:

 

  • 1st: would Asia be able to export its way out of the crisis? Is it even proper to aim only for this?

 

  • 2nd:: would the regional integration vaunted to be necessary to solidify and further the growth in Asia be resorted to, or given life in practice, in the wake of this crisis?

 

  • 3rd: in the design of crisis response, what is Asia aiming for?

    • Is it just to recover previous levels of consumption and economic activity?

    • How much of the response is for immediate relief, extremely necessary at this time?

    • And how much of this response is for the long-term and tries to take advantage of converting the crisis into opportunity?

 

 

At this point, I would like to emphasize three points that interrogate what Asia has managed or not managed to do:

 

  • One, note that the responses now differ qualitatively from the responses Asia had a decade ago.

 

    • There is no IMF, not least because the IMF has gained notoriety and lost a lot of credibility because of how it bungled its job in the late 1990s.

    • Not only is there no IMF, the policy and programmatic responses of Asia have been antithesis to what the IMF formerly prescribed.

      • There was no interest cure that killed business; instead efforts were concentrated on preserving relative low interest rates (including intervention in the forex market).

      • There were many elements of direct transfers, subsidies, and re-capitalization; something the IMF would never do (at least before).

    • In short, the responses are not patently neoliberal.

 

  • Two, these responses have not warranted enough incentive towards a focus on internal demand, on the one hand, and on coordinated expanded demand regionally, on the other.

 

    • More pointedly, it is a concern that Asia should even set as its main objective the recovery and maintenance of consumption levels prior to the crisis.

    • We should not be overly concerned about trying to save what has been clearly a cause of failure. It is high time for Asia to draw from regional resources and invent something that will again set it apart – or, place it in cooperation with other regions trying to imagine things differently.

 

  • Three, there is concern that ASEAN+3 finds it difficult to make good on regional financial cooperation as designed through the Chiang Mai Initiative and related processes.

 

    • Take for instance, when South Korea got hit when the Lehman Brothers collapsed, it negotiated a $30B foreign exchange swap with the US Federal Reserve and not the ASEAN+3. (They came later.)

    • Despite increases in commitments, the CMI is still not functional, and the IMF still plays a role when countries tap the CMI for more than 20% of their requirement, detracting from the importance of financial as well policy autonomy for Asia.

 

 

There are certainly elements of response – some quite innovative or at least properly targeted – in Asia. The question is whether Asia is able to turn the crisis on its head, and be able to emerge with another unique contribution to development discourse as it has been known to have done in the past.

 

Moreover, we as civil society and social movements, in our interrogation of possible alternatives, esp. if we have little or no hold on power – the question of how to get that power either by holding political power ourselves or rallying massive constituencies on our side – is key.

 

The final set of points I wish to make has to do with the areas where regional response would be crucial:

 

  • One, the need to focus on internal demand and a more coordinated rationalization of regional demand.

 

    • There is need to re-imagine trade and production cooperation, where instead of competition, the prevailing principles would be cooperation, complementation and solidarity.

    • Such arrangement must address the issue of excess, and should have as outer limit some climate and ecological threshold.

 

  • Two, there is need to overhaul the financial architecture for Asia

 

    • Away from dependence on Northern currencies, esp. the American $

    • And towards the pooling of alternative sources of development finance

    • As well as appropriate surveillance and monitoring systems (without the IMF) that assist countries and build confidence that every one takes responsibility for regional financial stability

 

  • Three, there is need to strengthen regional stockpiling for food security

 

    • South Asia has better experience on this although technically Southeast Asia pledges bigger reserves

    • Away from trade logic and towards regional self-help and development of crisis response capabilities.

 

  • Four, there is need to re-imagine the public

 

    • It is time to talk about the public not only in the narrow confines of the State or the government, but also support different forms of provisioning that allowed communities to survive at a time that the State was neglecting them.

    • It must be recognized that such strength can be scaled up at the national and the regional level.

 

  • Five, whatever alternative we think of, resonance with the people is important.

 

    • We need to start where there is clear demand, and patent need, to make regional arrangements acceptable to the people

      • Migration

      • Rights and democracy

      • Decent living standards and environment

      • Ability to generate economic activity and distribute its fruits equitably

    • There is need to also work on something that works and shows results in the immediate even as the strategic alternative structures are still being constructed.

Jenina Joy Chavez / Focus on the Global South

 

(Presentation at the Conference on “Regional Integration: an Opportunity Presented by the Crisis”, sale Asuncion, sovaldi sale Paraguay, case July 21-22, 2009.)

 

What I will tackle this evening is an updated version of the notes I used for the Regional Integration: Opportunities to Face the Crisis conference in Asuncion, Paraguay, and the Philippine WS on ASEAN, earlier this year. There is no claim that regional responses are the only viable responses to the global crisis, but hopefully we would be able to determine if it is appropriate to study and consider them as part of the many options on alternates we can try.

 

Before the crisis, it has been projected that in about a decade, the South –that is, the developing countries – would account for more than half of the world income and more than 50% of global trade. It has been trumpeted all over that Asia together with other emerging economies would be the major growth drivers in the world economy, highlighting the relevance of South-South cooperation, particularly regional economic integration in Asia.

 

For Asia, at least, this claim has been put to the test with the onset of the global financial crisis that put into the spotlight the basic development paradigm deployed by what is considered the world over as prosperous Asia.

 

 

In terms of what has happened in the last year and a half, following are some observations on how Asia tried to respond to the crisis:

 

  • First, unlike what characterized how the North (particularly Western Europe and North America) responded to the crisis, Asia’s response does not include massive bailout packages to failing corporations, particularly ailing financial entities.

 

    • This highlights the differential manifestations of the crisis. While financialization is a global phenomenon, sparing no one and certainly not Asia, Asia still hosts one of the most robust productive capacity worldwide – that is, the real economy remains the most significant feature of Asia’s growth and development.

 

  • Second, in most countries, though, the immediate response was to address the liquidity crunch and the crisis of confidence, especially in the banking system. This included moves to increase deposit insurance coverage, and guarantees on deposit-taking institutions. As a result, massive bank runs have been avoided.

 

  • Third, from the initial liquidity crunch, economic slowdown became the norm. Hence, governments moved to address this by increasing liquidity and easing credit and monetary policy, including intervening in foreign exchange markets. Many state enterprises also increased their shareholdings in publicly-traded companies. The result – relative low interest rates.

 

  • Fourth, stimulus packages have at their center fiscal policy and public spending, although social sector spending has not received much attention.

 

    • Asian countries have devoted between less than ½ percent of GDP to their fiscal stimulus package to more than 9%.

    • Among the biggest packages are those of the following:

      • Singapore, $15B (6%)

      • Malaysia, $2B initially to $16B (9% of GDP)

      • China, $600B spread only over 2 years

    • Most of the stimulus packages have a central tax break or tax credit component, as well as capital spending, including re-capitalization of state-run banks, most notably in India.

 

  • Fifth, the Asian response has been centered around resiliency. That is, they are focused on minimizing unemployment and on creating employment opportunities

 

    • With programs like job credits or payouts to employers of up to 12% of salaries (Singapore)

    • Various skills upgrading and retraining programs

    • Welfare support to retrenched workers and returning overseas workers.

    • Such resiliency packages, though, highlighted some tensions inherent in the increasingly connected Asian economies and job markets.

      • For instance, part of Malaysia’s and Singapore’s response is to cut down or crackdown on migrant workers, a classic response to appease worker’s restiveness at home, and a blatant disregard to the ripple such moves might effect.

 

  • Sixth, at least the ASEAN+3 is trying to improve on a regional financial cooperation first introduced in 2000 as a response to the 97/98 Asian financial crisis.

    • The Chiang Mai Initiative is a collaboration to create a network of bilateral swap arrangements to manage short-term liquidity problems.

    • From $20B in 2000, it increased to $80B in 2008, and earlier this year was increased further to $120B.

    • Moreover, the swaps are being multilateralized, a step towards developing from a bilateral into a regional pool.

    • This is about the only such regional initiative in Asia. There is no equivalent for South Asia, or in West and Central Asia.

 

 

From these observations, several key questions emerge:

 

  • 1st: would Asia be able to export its way out of the crisis? Is it even proper to aim only for this?

 

  • 2nd:: would the regional integration vaunted to be necessary to solidify and further the growth in Asia be resorted to, or given life in practice, in the wake of this crisis?

 

  • 3rd: in the design of crisis response, what is Asia aiming for?

    • Is it just to recover previous levels of consumption and economic activity?

    • How much of the response is for immediate relief, extremely necessary at this time?

    • And how much of this response is for the long-term and tries to take advantage of converting the crisis into opportunity?

 

 

At this point, I would like to emphasize three points that interrogate what Asia has managed or not managed to do:

 

  • One, note that the responses now differ qualitatively from the responses Asia had a decade ago.

 

    • There is no IMF, not least because the IMF has gained notoriety and lost a lot of credibility because of how it bungled its job in the late 1990s.

    • Not only is there no IMF, the policy and programmatic responses of Asia have been antithesis to what the IMF formerly prescribed.

      • There was no interest cure that killed business; instead efforts were concentrated on preserving relative low interest rates (including intervention in the forex market).

      • There were many elements of direct transfers, subsidies, and re-capitalization; something the IMF would never do (at least before).

    • In short, the responses are not patently neoliberal.

 

  • Two, these responses have not warranted enough incentive towards a focus on internal demand, on the one hand, and on coordinated expanded demand regionally, on the other.

 

    • More pointedly, it is a concern that Asia should even set as its main objective the recovery and maintenance of consumption levels prior to the crisis.

    • We should not be overly concerned about trying to save what has been clearly a cause of failure. It is high time for Asia to draw from regional resources and invent something that will again set it apart – or, place it in cooperation with other regions trying to imagine things differently.

 

  • Three, there is concern that ASEAN+3 finds it difficult to make good on regional financial cooperation as designed through the Chiang Mai Initiative and related processes.

 

    • Take for instance, when South Korea got hit when the Lehman Brothers collapsed, it negotiated a $30B foreign exchange swap with the US Federal Reserve and not the ASEAN+3. (They came later.)

    • Despite increases in commitments, the CMI is still not functional, and the IMF still plays a role when countries tap the CMI for more than 20% of their requirement, detracting from the importance of financial as well policy autonomy for Asia.

 

 

There are certainly elements of response – some quite innovative or at least properly targeted – in Asia. The question is whether Asia is able to turn the crisis on its head, and be able to emerge with another unique contribution to development discourse as it has been known to have done in the past.

 

Moreover, we as civil society and social movements, in our interrogation of possible alternatives, esp. if we have little or no hold on power – the question of how to get that power either by holding political power ourselves or rallying massive constituencies on our side – is key.

 

The final set of points I wish to make has to do with the areas where regional response would be crucial:

 

  • One, the need to focus on internal demand and a more coordinated rationalization of regional demand.

 

    • There is need to re-imagine trade and production cooperation, where instead of competition, the prevailing principles would be cooperation, complementation and solidarity.

    • Such arrangement must address the issue of excess, and should have as outer limit some climate and ecological threshold.

 

  • Two, there is need to overhaul the financial architecture for Asia

 

    • Away from dependence on Northern currencies, esp. the American $

    • And towards the pooling of alternative sources of development finance

    • As well as appropriate surveillance and monitoring systems (without the IMF) that assist countries and build confidence that every one takes responsibility for regional financial stability

 

  • Three, there is need to strengthen regional stockpiling for food security

 

    • South Asia has better experience on this although technically Southeast Asia pledges bigger reserves

    • Away from trade logic and towards regional self-help and development of crisis response capabilities.

 

  • Four, there is need to re-imagine the public

 

    • It is time to talk about the public not only in the narrow confines of the State or the government, but also support different forms of provisioning that allowed communities to survive at a time that the State was neglecting them.

    • It must be recognized that such strength can be scaled up at the national and the regional level.

 

  • Five, whatever alternative we think of, resonance with the people is important.

 

    • We need to start where there is clear demand, and patent need, to make regional arrangements acceptable to the people

      • Migration

      • Rights and democracy

      • Decent living standards and environment

      • Ability to generate economic activity and distribute its fruits equitably

    • There is need to also work on something that works and shows results in the immediate even as the strategic alternative structures are still being constructed.

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } A:link { color: #0000ff } –>

Jenina Joy Chavez / Focus on the Global South

 

(Presentation at the Conference on “Regional Integration: an Opportunity Presented by the Crisis”, sale Asuncion, pills Paraguay, July 21-22, 2009.)

 

What I will tackle this evening is an updated version of the notes I used for the Regional Integration: Opportunities to Face the Crisis conference in Asuncion, Paraguay, and the Philippine WS on ASEAN, earlier this year. There is no claim that regional responses are the only viable responses to the global crisis, but hopefully we would be able to determine if it is appropriate to study and consider them as part of the many options on alternates we can try.

 

Before the crisis, it has been projected that in about a decade, the South –that is, the developing countries – would account for more than half of the world income and more than 50% of global trade. It has been trumpeted all over that Asia together with other emerging economies would be the major growth drivers in the world economy, highlighting the relevance of South-South cooperation, particularly regional economic integration in Asia.

 

For Asia, at least, this claim has been put to the test with the onset of the global financial crisis that put into the spotlight the basic development paradigm deployed by what is considered the world over as prosperous Asia.

 

 

In terms of what has happened in the last year and a half, following are some observations on how Asia tried to respond to the crisis:

 

  • First, unlike what characterized how the North (particularly Western Europe and North America) responded to the crisis, Asia’s response does not include massive bailout packages to failing corporations, particularly ailing financial entities.

 

    • This highlights the differential manifestations of the crisis. While financialization is a global phenomenon, sparing no one and certainly not Asia, Asia still hosts one of the most robust productive capacity worldwide – that is, the real economy remains the most significant feature of Asia’s growth and development.

 

  • Second, in most countries, though, the immediate response was to address the liquidity crunch and the crisis of confidence, especially in the banking system. This included moves to increase deposit insurance coverage, and guarantees on deposit-taking institutions. As a result, massive bank runs have been avoided.

 

  • Third, from the initial liquidity crunch, economic slowdown became the norm. Hence, governments moved to address this by increasing liquidity and easing credit and monetary policy, including intervening in foreign exchange markets. Many state enterprises also increased their shareholdings in publicly-traded companies. The result – relative low interest rates.

 

  • Fourth, stimulus packages have at their center fiscal policy and public spending, although social sector spending has not received much attention.

 

    • Asian countries have devoted between less than ½ percent of GDP to their fiscal stimulus package to more than 9%.

    • Among the biggest packages are those of the following:

      • Singapore, $15B (6%)

      • Malaysia, $2B initially to $16B (9% of GDP)

      • China, $600B spread only over 2 years

    • Most of the stimulus packages have a central tax break or tax credit component, as well as capital spending, including re-capitalization of state-run banks, most notably in India.

 

  • Fifth, the Asian response has been centered around resiliency. That is, they are focused on minimizing unemployment and on creating employment opportunities

 

    • With programs like job credits or payouts to employers of up to 12% of salaries (Singapore)

    • Various skills upgrading and retraining programs

    • Welfare support to retrenched workers and returning overseas workers.

    • Such resiliency packages, though, highlighted some tensions inherent in the increasingly connected Asian economies and job markets.

      • For instance, part of Malaysia’s and Singapore’s response is to cut down or crackdown on migrant workers, a classic response to appease worker’s restiveness at home, and a blatant disregard to the ripple such moves might effect.

 

  • Sixth, at least the ASEAN+3 is trying to improve on a regional financial cooperation first introduced in 2000 as a response to the 97/98 Asian financial crisis.

    • The Chiang Mai Initiative is a collaboration to create a network of bilateral swap arrangements to manage short-term liquidity problems.

    • From $20B in 2000, it increased to $80B in 2008, and earlier this year was increased further to $120B.

    • Moreover, the swaps are being multilateralized, a step towards developing from a bilateral into a regional pool.

    • This is about the only such regional initiative in Asia. There is no equivalent for South Asia, or in West and Central Asia.

 

 

From these observations, several key questions emerge:

 

  • 1st: would Asia be able to export its way out of the crisis? Is it even proper to aim only for this?

 

  • 2nd:: would the regional integration vaunted to be necessary to solidify and further the growth in Asia be resorted to, or given life in practice, in the wake of this crisis?

 

  • 3rd: in the design of crisis response, what is Asia aiming for?

    • Is it just to recover previous levels of consumption and economic activity?

    • How much of the response is for immediate relief, extremely necessary at this time?

    • And how much of this response is for the long-term and tries to take advantage of converting the crisis into opportunity?

 

 

At this point, I would like to emphasize three points that interrogate what Asia has managed or not managed to do:

 

  • One, note that the responses now differ qualitatively from the responses Asia had a decade ago.

 

    • There is no IMF, not least because the IMF has gained notoriety and lost a lot of credibility because of how it bungled its job in the late 1990s.

    • Not only is there no IMF, the policy and programmatic responses of Asia have been antithesis to what the IMF formerly prescribed.

      • There was no interest cure that killed business; instead efforts were concentrated on preserving relative low interest rates (including intervention in the forex market).

      • There were many elements of direct transfers, subsidies, and re-capitalization; something the IMF would never do (at least before).

    • In short, the responses are not patently neoliberal.

 

  • Two, these responses have not warranted enough incentive towards a focus on internal demand, on the one hand, and on coordinated expanded demand regionally, on the other.

 

    • More pointedly, it is a concern that Asia should even set as its main objective the recovery and maintenance of consumption levels prior to the crisis.

    • We should not be overly concerned about trying to save what has been clearly a cause of failure. It is high time for Asia to draw from regional resources and invent something that will again set it apart – or, place it in cooperation with other regions trying to imagine things differently.

 

  • Three, there is concern that ASEAN+3 finds it difficult to make good on regional financial cooperation as designed through the Chiang Mai Initiative and related processes.

 

    • Take for instance, when South Korea got hit when the Lehman Brothers collapsed, it negotiated a $30B foreign exchange swap with the US Federal Reserve and not the ASEAN+3. (They came later.)

    • Despite increases in commitments, the CMI is still not functional, and the IMF still plays a role when countries tap the CMI for more than 20% of their requirement, detracting from the importance of financial as well policy autonomy for Asia.

 

 

There are certainly elements of response – some quite innovative or at least properly targeted – in Asia. The question is whether Asia is able to turn the crisis on its head, and be able to emerge with another unique contribution to development discourse as it has been known to have done in the past.

 

Moreover, we as civil society and social movements, in our interrogation of possible alternatives, esp. if we have little or no hold on power – the question of how to get that power either by holding political power ourselves or rallying massive constituencies on our side – is key.

 

The final set of points I wish to make has to do with the areas where regional response would be crucial:

 

  • One, the need to focus on internal demand and a more coordinated rationalization of regional demand.

 

    • There is need to re-imagine trade and production cooperation, where instead of competition, the prevailing principles would be cooperation, complementation and solidarity.

    • Such arrangement must address the issue of excess, and should have as outer limit some climate and ecological threshold.

 

  • Two, there is need to overhaul the financial architecture for Asia

 

    • Away from dependence on Northern currencies, esp. the American $

    • And towards the pooling of alternative sources of development finance

    • As well as appropriate surveillance and monitoring systems (without the IMF) that assist countries and build confidence that every one takes responsibility for regional financial stability

 

  • Three, there is need to strengthen regional stockpiling for food security

 

    • South Asia has better experience on this although technically Southeast Asia pledges bigger reserves

    • Away from trade logic and towards regional self-help and development of crisis response capabilities.

 

  • Four, there is need to re-imagine the public

 

    • It is time to talk about the public not only in the narrow confines of the State or the government, but also support different forms of provisioning that allowed communities to survive at a time that the State was neglecting them.

    • It must be recognized that such strength can be scaled up at the national and the regional level.

 

  • Five, whatever alternative we think of, resonance with the people is important.

 

    • We need to start where there is clear demand, and patent need, to make regional arrangements acceptable to the people

      • Migration

      • Rights and democracy

      • Decent living standards and environment

      • Ability to generate economic activity and distribute its fruits equitably

    • There is need to also work on something that works and shows results in the immediate even as the strategic alternative structures are still being constructed.

See Programme and download some of the presentations of the

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises”

DATES: 21 and 22 July 2009
VENUE: PRODEPA, Sala 1, Consejo Nacional del Deporte, Asunción del Paraguay
TIME: 9am-20pm


PROGRAMME


21 JULY

09:00–09:30

Opening: Greeting from organisers

– Enrique Daza, Executive Secretary, Hemispheric Social Alliance, Colombia
– Brid Brennan, TNI/Peoples’ Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms, Netherlands
– Guillermo Ortega, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay
– Héctor Lacognata, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay

09:30–11:30 Systemic Crisis, impacts of the crisis on regional integration processes

– Juan Gonzalez, MOSIP, Argentina
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Tetteh Hormeku, TWN/ATN, Ghana

– Elizabeth Gauthier, Espace Marx, France (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION ENGLISH – POWER POINT / TEXT)

Moderation

Cecilia Olivet,

TNI, Netherlands

11:30-13:30 Regional responses to the crises

– Juan Castillo, Secretary for International Relations PIT-CNT, Uruguay

– Demba Moussa Dembele, African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South, Philippines (PRESENTATION)
– Frederic Viale, ATTAC France

Moderation

José Miguel Hernández,

CTC Nacional/ CC-ASC, Cuba

13:30-15:00 Lunch
15:00-17:30 Regional Integration: Re-thinking the development model. Complementarity versus competition. Integration and Asymmetries

– Jorge Lara Castro, Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay
– Oscar Laborde, Government Argentina

– Tomas Palau, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

– Graciela Rodriguez, REBRIP, Brazil

– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)

– Charles Santiago, Member of Parliament, Malaysia

Moderation

Gonzalo Berrón,

ASC/CSA, Brazil

17:30-18:00 Coffee break
18:00-20:00 Development Model and Infrastructure
– Guilherme Carvalho, Rede Brasil sobre  Instituições Financeiras Multilaterais, Brazil
– Ricardo Miranda, Confederación Sindical Única de Trabajadores Campesinos de Bolivia (CSUTCB), Bolivia
– Michelle Pressend, Trade Strategy Group, South Africa

Moderation

Ximana Centellas,

Directora General de

Gestión Pública,

Viceministerio de

Coordinación y Gestión Gubernamental, Bolivia


22 JULY


09:00-10:45 Energy Crisis and Climate Change: the challenge to find regional solutions

– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines

– Pablo Bertinat, Cono Sur Sustentable, Argentina (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – SPANISH)
– Roberto Colman, Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – SPANISH)
– Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Accion, Spain

Moderation
Fernando Rojas, Decidamos,

Iniciativa Paraguaya por la

Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

10:45-11:00 Coffe Break
11:00-13:00 Production model and Food Sovereignty

– Juan José Dominguez, Member of Parliament, MPP–FA, Uruguay

– Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal
– Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia
– Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe
– Francisca Rodriguez, CONAMURI/CLOC, Chile (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION SPANISH)

Moderation

Martin Prieto, Redes Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay

13:00-14:00 Lunch
14:00–16:00 Finances and development model: New financial structures: (Bank of the South, regional currencies, etc)
– Pedro Paez, President of the Ecuadorian Presidential Technical Commission for the New Regional Financial Architecture and Bank of the South, Ecuador
– Beverly Keene, Jubilee South, Argentina
– Ivan Lukas, Glopolis, Czech Republic

Moderation

Veronique Sandoval, Espace Marx, France

16:00-17:00 Regional Peace, Democracy and Human Rights

– Lee, Seung-Heon, Chief External Relations Department of the Korea Democratic Labor Party, South Korea (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Camille Chalmers, Campaign for Demilitarisation of the Americas, Haiti

– Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Pezo Mateo-Phiri, SAPSN, Zambia (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)

Moderation

Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ

Paraguay/ Iniciativa

Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos, Paraguay

17:00–17:30 Coffee break
17:30–20:00

Round Table: Regional Integration: challenges for the movements and the governments

– Chacho Alvarez, President Committee of Permanent Representatives of MERCOSUR, Argentina
– Ana Cristina Betancourt Garcia, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia
– Gustavo Codas, Government Paraguay
– Franklin Gonzalez, Government Venezuela
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/TNI, Venezuela
– Walden Bello, Focus on the Global South/MP, Philippines
– Nalu Farias, World March of Women, Brazil
– Brid Brennan, TNI, Netherlands
– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa
Moderation
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México


Co- Organisers
Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), Iniciativa Paraguaya para la Integración de los Pueblos, People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR), Focus on the Global South and Transnational Institute (TNI)

In cooperation with
Trade Union Confederation of the Americas (TUCA), Southern African People’s Solidarity Network (SAPSN), People’s SAARC, Solidarity for Asian People’s Advocacy (SAPA)


SEE the COMMUNIQUE: Regional Integration and Itaipu energy agreement (Paraguay, 22 July 2009)

See Programme and download some of the presentations of the

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises”

DATES: 21 and 22 July 2009
VENUE: PRODEPA, Sala 1, seek Consejo Nacional del Deporte, Asunción del Paraguay
TIME: 9am-20pm


PROGRAMME


21 JULY

09:00–09:30

Opening: Greeting from organisers

– Enrique Daza, Executive Secretary, Hemispheric Social Alliance, Colombia
– Brid Brennan, TNI/Peoples’ Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms, Netherlands
– Guillermo Ortega, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay
– Héctor Lacognata, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay

09:30–11:30 Systemic Crisis, impacts of the crisis on regional integration processes

– Juan Gonzalez, MOSIP, Argentina
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Tetteh Hormeku, TWN/ATN, Ghana

– Elizabeth Gauthier, Espace Marx, France (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION ENGLISH – POWER POINT / TEXT)

Moderation

Cecilia Olivet,

TNI, Netherlands

11:30-13:30 Regional responses to the crises

– Juan Castillo, Secretary for International Relations PIT-CNT, Uruguay

– Demba Moussa Dembele, African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South, Philippines
– Frederic Viale, ATTAC France

Moderation

José Miguel Hernández,

CTC Nacional/ CC-ASC, Cuba

13:30-15:00 Lunch
15:00-17:30 Regional Integration: Re-thinking the development model. Complementarity versus competition. Integration and Asymmetries

– Jorge Lara Castro, Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay
– Oscar Laborde, Government Argentina

– Tomas Palau, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

– Graciela Rodriguez, REBRIP, Brazil

– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)

– Charles Santiago, Member of Parliament, Malaysia

Moderation

Gonzalo Berrón,

ASC/CSA, Brazil

17:30-18:00 Coffee break
18:00-20:00 Development Model and Infrastructure
– Guilherme Carvalho, Rede Brasil sobre  Instituições Financeiras Multilaterais, Brazil
– Ricardo Miranda, Confederación Sindical Única de Trabajadores Campesinos de Bolivia (CSUTCB), Bolivia
– Michelle Pressend, Trade Strategy Group, South Africa

Moderation

Ximana Centellas,

Directora General de

Gestión Pública,

Viceministerio de

Coordinación y Gestión Gubernamental, Bolivia


22 JULY


09:00-10:45 Energy Crisis and Climate Change: the challenge to find regional solutions

– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines

– Pablo Bertinat, Cono Sur Sustentable, Argentina (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – SPANISH)
– Roberto Colman, Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – SPANISH)
– Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Accion, Spain

Moderation
Fernando Rojas, Decidamos,

Iniciativa Paraguaya por la

Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

10:45-11:00 Coffe Break
11:00-13:00 Production model and Food Sovereignty

– Juan José Dominguez, Member of Parliament, MPP–FA, Uruguay

– Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal
– Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia
– Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe
– Francisca Rodriguez, CONAMURI/CLOC, Chile (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION SPANISH)

Moderation

Martin Prieto, Redes Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay

13:00-14:00 Lunch
14:00–16:00 Finances and development model: New financial structures: (Bank of the South, regional currencies, etc)
– Pedro Paez, President of the Ecuadorian Presidential Technical Commission for the New Regional Financial Architecture and Bank of the South, Ecuador
– Beverly Keene, Jubilee South, Argentina
– Ivan Lukas, Glopolis, Czech Republic

Moderation

Veronique Sandoval, Espace Marx, France

16:00-17:00 Regional Peace, Democracy and Human Rights

– Lee, Seung-Heon, Chief External Relations Department of the Korea Democratic Labor Party, South Korea (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Camille Chalmers, Campaign for Demilitarisation of the Americas, Haiti

– Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Pezo Mateo-Phiri, SAPSN, Zambia (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)

Moderation

Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ

Paraguay/ Iniciativa

Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos, Paraguay

17:00–17:30 Coffee break
17:30–20:00

Round Table: Regional Integration: challenges for the movements and the governments

– Chacho Alvarez, President Committee of Permanent Representatives of MERCOSUR, Argentina
– Ana Cristina Betancourt Garcia, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia
– Gustavo Codas, Government Paraguay
– Franklin Gonzalez, Government Venezuela
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/TNI, Venezuela
– Walden Bello, Focus on the Global South/MP, Philippines
– Nalu Farias, World March of Women, Brazil
– Brid Brennan, TNI, Netherlands
– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa
Moderation
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México


Co- Organisers
Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), Iniciativa Paraguaya para la Integración de los Pueblos, People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR), Focus on the Global South and Transnational Institute (TNI)

In cooperation with
Trade Union Confederation of the Americas (TUCA), Southern African People’s Solidarity Network (SAPSN), People’s SAARC, Solidarity for Asian People’s Advocacy (SAPA)


SEE the COMMUNIQUE: Regional Integration and Itaipu energy agreement (Paraguay, 22 July 2009)

See Programme and download some of the presentations of the

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises”

DATES: 21 and 22 July 2009
VENUE: PRODEPA, salve Sala 1, clinic Consejo Nacional del Deporte, purchase Asunción del Paraguay
TIME: 9am-20pm


PROGRAMME


21 JULY

09:00–09:30

Opening: Greeting from organisers

– Enrique Daza, Executive Secretary, Hemispheric Social Alliance, Colombia
– Brid Brennan, TNI/Peoples’ Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms, Netherlands
– Guillermo Ortega, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay
– Héctor Lacognata, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay

09:30–11:30 Systemic Crisis, impacts of the crisis on regional integration processes

– Juan Gonzalez, MOSIP, Argentina
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Tetteh Hormeku, TWN/ATN, Ghana

– Elizabeth Gauthier, Espace Marx, France (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION ENGLISH – POWER POINT / TEXT)

Moderation

Cecilia Olivet,

TNI, Netherlands

11:30-13:30 Regional responses to the crises

– Juan Castillo, Secretary for International Relations PIT-CNT, Uruguay

– Demba Moussa Dembele, African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South, Philippines (PRESENTATION)
– Frederic Viale, ATTAC France

Moderation

José Miguel Hernández,

CTC Nacional/ CC-ASC, Cuba

13:30-15:00 Lunch
15:00-17:30 Regional Integration: Re-thinking the development model. Complementarity versus competition. Integration and Asymmetries

– Jorge Lara Castro, Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay
– Oscar Laborde, Government Argentina

– Tomas Palau, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

– Graciela Rodriguez, REBRIP, Brazil

– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)

– Charles Santiago, Member of Parliament, Malaysia

Moderation

Gonzalo Berrón,

ASC/CSA, Brazil

17:30-18:00 Coffee break
18:00-20:00 Development Model and Infrastructure
– Guilherme Carvalho, Rede Brasil sobre  Instituições Financeiras Multilaterais, Brazil
– Ricardo Miranda, Confederación Sindical Única de Trabajadores Campesinos de Bolivia (CSUTCB), Bolivia
– Michelle Pressend, Trade Strategy Group, South Africa

Moderation

Ximana Centellas,

Directora General de

Gestión Pública,

Viceministerio de

Coordinación y Gestión Gubernamental, Bolivia


22 JULY


09:00-10:45 Energy Crisis and Climate Change: the challenge to find regional solutions

– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines

– Pablo Bertinat, Cono Sur Sustentable, Argentina (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – SPANISH)
– Roberto Colman, Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – SPANISH)
– Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Accion, Spain

Moderation
Fernando Rojas, Decidamos,

Iniciativa Paraguaya por la

Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

10:45-11:00 Coffe Break
11:00-13:00 Production model and Food Sovereignty

– Juan José Dominguez, Member of Parliament, MPP–FA, Uruguay

– Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal
– Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia
– Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe
– Francisca Rodriguez, CONAMURI/CLOC, Chile (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION SPANISH)

Moderation

Martin Prieto, Redes Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay

13:00-14:00 Lunch
14:00–16:00 Finances and development model: New financial structures: (Bank of the South, regional currencies, etc)
– Pedro Paez, President of the Ecuadorian Presidential Technical Commission for the New Regional Financial Architecture and Bank of the South, Ecuador
– Beverly Keene, Jubilee South, Argentina
– Ivan Lukas, Glopolis, Czech Republic

Moderation

Veronique Sandoval, Espace Marx, France

16:00-17:00 Regional Peace, Democracy and Human Rights

– Lee, Seung-Heon, Chief External Relations Department of the Korea Democratic Labor Party, South Korea (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Camille Chalmers, Campaign for Demilitarisation of the Americas, Haiti

– Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Pezo Mateo-Phiri, SAPSN, Zambia (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)

Moderation

Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ

Paraguay/ Iniciativa

Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos, Paraguay

17:00–17:30 Coffee break
17:30–20:00

Round Table: Regional Integration: challenges for the movements and the governments

– Chacho Alvarez, President Committee of Permanent Representatives of MERCOSUR, Argentina
– Ana Cristina Betancourt Garcia, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia
– Gustavo Codas, Government Paraguay
– Franklin Gonzalez, Government Venezuela
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/TNI, Venezuela
– Walden Bello, Focus on the Global South/MP, Philippines
– Nalu Farias, World March of Women, Brazil
– Brid Brennan, TNI, Netherlands
– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa
Moderation
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México


Co- Organisers
Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), Iniciativa Paraguaya para la Integración de los Pueblos, People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR), Focus on the Global South and Transnational Institute (TNI)

In cooperation with
Trade Union Confederation of the Americas (TUCA), Southern African People’s Solidarity Network (SAPSN), People’s SAARC, Solidarity for Asian People’s Advocacy (SAPA)


SEE the COMMUNIQUE: Regional Integration and Itaipu energy agreement (Paraguay, 22 July 2009)

See Programme and download some of the presentations of the

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises”

DATES: 21 and 22 July 2009
VENUE: PRODEPA, troche ask Sala 1, Consejo Nacional del Deporte, Asunción del Paraguay
TIME: 9am-20pm


PROGRAMME


21 JULY

09:00–09:30

Opening: Greeting from organisers

– Enrique Daza, Executive Secretary, Hemispheric Social Alliance, Colombia
– Brid Brennan, TNI/Peoples’ Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms, Netherlands
– Guillermo Ortega, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay
– Héctor Lacognata, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay

09:30–11:30 Systemic Crisis, impacts of the crisis on regional integration processes

– Juan Gonzalez, MOSIP, Argentina
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Tetteh Hormeku, TWN/ATN, Ghana

– Elizabeth Gauthier, Espace Marx, France (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION ENGLISH – POWER POINT / TEXT)

Moderation

Cecilia Olivet,

TNI, Netherlands

11:30-13:30 Regional responses to the crises

– Juan Castillo, Secretary for International Relations PIT-CNT, Uruguay

– Demba Moussa Dembele, African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South, Philippines (PRESENTATION)
– Frederic Viale, ATTAC France

Moderation

José Miguel Hernández,

CTC Nacional/ CC-ASC, Cuba

13:30-15:00 Lunch
15:00-17:30 Regional Integration: Re-thinking the development model. Complementarity versus competition. Integration and Asymmetries

– Jorge Lara Castro, Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay
– Oscar Laborde, Government Argentina

– Tomas Palau, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

– Graciela Rodriguez, REBRIP, Brazil

– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)

– Charles Santiago, Member of Parliament, Malaysia

Moderation

Gonzalo Berrón,

ASC/CSA, Brazil

17:30-18:00 Coffee break
18:00-20:00 Development Model and Infrastructure
– Guilherme Carvalho, Rede Brasil sobre  Instituições Financeiras Multilaterais, Brazil
– Ricardo Miranda, Confederación Sindical Única de Trabajadores Campesinos de Bolivia (CSUTCB), Bolivia
– Michelle Pressend, Trade Strategy Group, South Africa

Moderation

Ximana Centellas,

Directora General de

Gestión Pública,

Viceministerio de

Coordinación y Gestión Gubernamental, Bolivia


22 JULY


09:00-10:45 Energy Crisis and Climate Change: the challenge to find regional solutions

– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines

– Pablo Bertinat, Cono Sur Sustentable, Argentina (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – SPANISH)
– Roberto Colman, Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – SPANISH)
– Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Accion, Spain

Moderation
Fernando Rojas, Decidamos,

Iniciativa Paraguaya por la

Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

10:45-11:00 Coffe Break
11:00-13:00 Production model and Food Sovereignty

– Juan José Dominguez, Member of Parliament, MPP–FA, Uruguay

– Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal
– Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia
– Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe
– Francisca Rodriguez, CONAMURI/CLOC, Chile (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION SPANISH)

Moderation

Martin Prieto, Redes Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay

13:00-14:00 Lunch
14:00–16:00 Finances and development model: New financial structures: (Bank of the South, regional currencies, etc)
– Pedro Paez, President of the Ecuadorian Presidential Technical Commission for the New Regional Financial Architecture and Bank of the South, Ecuador
– Beverly Keene, Jubilee South, Argentina
– Ivan Lukas, Glopolis, Czech Republic

Moderation

Veronique Sandoval, Espace Marx, France

16:00-17:00 Regional Peace, Democracy and Human Rights

– Lee, Seung-Heon, Chief External Relations Department of the Korea Democratic Labor Party, South Korea (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Camille Chalmers, Campaign for Demilitarisation of the Americas, Haiti

– Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Pezo Mateo-Phiri, SAPSN, Zambia (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)

Moderation

Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ

Paraguay/ Iniciativa

Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos, Paraguay

17:00–17:30 Coffee break
17:30–20:00

Round Table: Regional Integration: challenges for the movements and the governments

– Chacho Alvarez, President Committee of Permanent Representatives of MERCOSUR, Argentina
– Ana Cristina Betancourt Garcia, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia
– Gustavo Codas, Government Paraguay
– Franklin Gonzalez, Government Venezuela
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/TNI, Venezuela
– Walden Bello, Focus on the Global South/MP, Philippines
– Nalu Farias, World March of Women, Brazil
– Brid Brennan, TNI, Netherlands
– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa
Moderation
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México


Co- Organisers
Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), Iniciativa Paraguaya para la Integración de los Pueblos, People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR), Focus on the Global South and Transnational Institute (TNI)

In cooperation with
Trade Union Confederation of the Americas (TUCA), Southern African People’s Solidarity Network (SAPSN), People’s SAARC, Solidarity for Asian People’s Advocacy (SAPA)


SEE the COMMUNIQUE: Regional Integration and Itaipu energy agreement (Paraguay, 22 July 2009)

20 October 2009, capsule sickness 18-21hs, Cha-am, shop Thailand

This Public Forum was held during the 2nd ASEAN Peoples’ Forum / 5th ASEAN Civil Society Conference 18-20 October 2009 Cha-am, Phetchaburi Province, Thailand

Introduction

Finding solutions to the crises (economic, energy, food, climate and security) is urgent, and today it is at the core of the agenda of both social movements and governments. For countries in the different regions, regional integration appears as a way to overcome the global economic crisis through the development of solidarity and dynamic intra-regional economic ties.

In this context, re-thinking regional integration as a solution to the crisis can give a powerful impulse to building an alternative development project in each region (Latin America, Asia, Africa and Europe) that is more sustainable and equitable than the current development model which countries follow today.

However, the current regional spaces are contested arenas. It is crucial, therefore, that social movements search and seek for common strategies.

The Open Forum will advance the debate and cross-fertilisation of experiences among social movements and civil society organisations from Latin America, Asia and Europe about the possibilities to respond to these crises through regional alternatives and a model of regional integration that promotes a change in the development model of the regions. It will aim to highlight the challenges and possibilities of moving forward in the concretisation of regional alternatives to the economic, financial, food, climate and energy crises that place the interest of people and the planet at its center.

PROGRAMME

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from South East Asia (ASEAN)
Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South/SAPA/ACSC, Philippines

 

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from Latin America
Diana Aguiar, IGTN/REBRIP/Hemispheric Social Alliance, Brazil

 

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from South Asia (SAARC)

Mohammed Mahuruf, People’s SAARC, Sri Lanka

 

European regional responses to the crisis and People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms
Cecilia Olivet, Transnational Institute, Netherlands

Open Forum Discussion: The potential of regional alternatives and the need for cross-regional networking – focus and priorities

Moderator: Aya Fabros, Focus on the Global South, Philippines

 

Co-Convenors:

Focus on the Global South, Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), People’s SAARC, Transnational Institute (TNI) and People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR)

 

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } A:link { color: #0000ff } –>

20 October 2009, sovaldi sale 18-21hs, Cha-am, Thailand

This Public Forum was held during the 2nd ASEAN Peoples’ Forum / 5th ASEAN Civil Society Conference 18-20 October 2009 Cha-am, Phetchaburi Province, Thailand

Introduction

Finding solutions to the crises (economic, energy, food, climate and security) is urgent, and today it is at the core of the agenda of both social movements and governments. For countries in the different regions, regional integration appears as a way to overcome the global economic crisis through the development of solidarity and dynamic intra-regional economic ties.

In this context, re-thinking regional integration as a solution to the crisis can give a powerful impulse to building an alternative development project in each region (Latin America, Asia, Africa and Europe) that is more sustainable and equitable than the current development model which countries follow today.

However, the current regional spaces are contested arenas. It is crucial, therefore, that social movements search and seek for common strategies.

The Open Forum will advance the debate and cross-fertilisation of experiences among social movements and civil society organisations from Latin America, Asia and Europe about the possibilities to respond to these crises through regional alternatives and a model of regional integration that promotes a change in the development model of the regions. It will aim to highlight the challenges and possibilities of moving forward in the concretisation of regional alternatives to the economic, financial, food, climate and energy crises that place the interest of people and the planet at its center.

PROGRAMME

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from South East Asia (ASEAN)
Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South/SAPA/ACSC, Philippines

 

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from Latin America
Diana Aguiar, IGTN/REBRIP/Hemispheric Social Alliance, Brazil

 

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from South Asia (SAARC)

Mohammed Mahuruf, People’s SAARC, Sri Lanka

 

European regional responses to the crisis and People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms
Cecilia Olivet, Transnational Institute, Netherlands

Open Forum Discussion: The potential of regional alternatives and the need for cross-regional networking – focus and priorities

Moderator: Aya Fabros, Focus on the Global South, Philippines

 

Co-Convenors:

Focus on the Global South, Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), People’s SAARC, Transnational Institute (TNI) and People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR)

 

Cha-am, cheap Thailand, 18 – 20 October 2009

We, more than 500 delegates at the 2nd ASEAN Peoples’ Forum (APF II) / 5th ASEAN Civil Society Conference (ACSC V), representing various civil society organizations and , movements of workers from rural and urban sectors as well as migrant sector, peasants and farmers, women, children, youth, the elderly, people with disability, urban poor, indigenous peoples, ethnic minorities, fisher folks, stateless persons and other vulnerable groups, gathered together in Cha-am, Thailand, 18-20 October 2009 to discuss the main concerns confronting the peoples of ASEAN and developing key proposals for the 15th ASEAN Summit.

We would like to extend our deepest condolences and solidarity with victims and survivors of the natural disasters currently affecting lives of people in Cambodia, Indonesia, the Philippines, Vietnam, and the Pacific. We call for ASEAN to ensure the protection for the population affected by natural disasters encompasses all relevant guarantees which include civil and political rights as well as economic, social and cultural rights. These rights are attributed to the people through fundamental human rights and international humanitarian law. We urge governments to take concrete measures to eliminate all forms of discrimination, especially against women and minorities, in the relief, humanitarian assistance and development processes following the occurrence of these disasters.

We reaffirm the fundamental principles of democracy, human rights and dignity, good governance, the best interests of the child, meaningful and substantive peoples’ participation, and sustainable development in the pursuit of economic, social, gender and ecological justice so as to bring peace and prosperity to the ASEAN region.

We are deeply disappointed by the absence of our government officials in this meeting. This is a step backward on ASEAN’s commitment to promote a people-oriented ASEAN. It runs contrary to the principles in the ASEAN Charter that encourages people’s participation. We call on ASEAN to recognise the role of civil society and institutionalize people’s participation and engagement in all the ASEAN processes and pillars.

Human conditions and issues confronting the peoples cut across all current pillars of the ASEAN. ASEAN governments must adopt a more holistic approach with regards to development, equal and just treatment of the peoples, and harmonize its policies and practices of all its pillars. Particularly, human rights violations experienced by women and girl-children are often compounded by the intersection of different and multiple layers of discrimination resulting from the intersection of gender with other systems of power, such as race, class/caste, rural location, ethnicity, immigrant status, sexual orientation and gender identities, citizenship, religion and other factors. Furthermore, the principle of free, prior and informed consent of for all peoples, especially indigenous peoples must be pursued in the fulfilment of all political, economic and social agreements under the ASEAN. The ASEAN must ensure that its development initiatives do not further aggravate global warming.

Economic Pillar

The ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) envisions a stable, prosperous and highly competitive region with equitable economic development, reduced poverty and economic disparities through complete liberalization and opening up of the regional economy by 2015. However, this framework of a competitive market economy, which mainly benefits MNCs/TNCs, and developed by ASEAN governments, has impoverished people, undermined, and harmed livelihoods , especially small scale farmers, fishers, and workers in developing countries. This has further exacerbated regional asymmetries and has lead to greater inequality and dispossession. The economic integration model pursued by ASEAN has negatively impacted local and migrant workers and their families, including the undocumented, stateless, and people with HIV/AIDS; especially where working conditions, livelihoods and living standards have deteriorated.

We will work in unity to ensure that all ASEAN workers enjoy basic workers’ rights as outlined in the ILO core labour standards. We urge governments to facilitate dialogue between trade unions, civil society, and employers at national and ASEAN levels.

7 We call on ASEAN to institute rights-based pathways to regularize semi and low-skilled labor migration, reduce barriers to cross-border and internal migration, and guarantee labor protection for informal workers, especially domestic workers. To achieve these objectives, we demand the protection of migrants’ rights regardless of legal status, such as those of undocumented migrant workers. We urge ASEAN governments to respond to the impacts of the global financial crisis in a sustainable way by investing in a strong social economic infrastructure, specifically in the sectors of education, public healthcare, childcare, social insurance and rural areas. This infrastructure should create sustainable growth and long-term employment. Working women comprise 60% of the workforce, are threatened by the financial crisis. We urge the ASEAN to take immediate steps to extend social protection to women workers.

We ask ASEAN to support and cooperate with the peoples to conduct independent and strategic assessments in trade and investment agreements, projects, and industrial processes before they are negotiated. They should use the following assessments: Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), Social Impact Assessment (SIA), Human Impact Assessment (HIA) and gender impact assessment. Any trading agreement must not have a negative impact on access to medicine and medical treatment.

ASEAN must enforce fundamental rights of people to access medical treatment including medical technology and medicine. Therefore, any trading agreement must not have a negative impact on such access.

We urge ASEAN to give priority to building a people’s community, supporting grassroots economies and peoples’ livelihoods, including traditional occupations. We reject the unbridled liberalization of investments in intensive industrial agriculture in the sector of land and marine aquaculture that gives MNCs and TNCs undue control over fisheries, forests farmlands, and other natural resources. It should invest in building people’s capacity to participate in the decision making processes in trade and investment activities instead of favoring MNCs and TNCs. Its economic policies must be responsive to sensitive sectors such as food security, and must reject investment liberalization in the sectors of agriculture, aqua culture, both marine and inland, and forestry.

10. We call on the attention and action of ASEAN to the cause of small fisherfolk. The Coral Triangle Initiative (CTI) in particular has the objective of preserving fishing grounds in the region yet there is no consultation with small fishers. The millions of fisherfolk, especially in the South China Sea, must be heard and supported by ASEAN. Further, we reiterate our call on ASEAN to come up with a Council for Small Farmers, Fishers, Social Entrepreneurs and Producers and create agricultural policies that uphold the rights of small farmers, food sovereignty, and protect land rights.

11. We call upon all ASEAN states that have not done so to ratify the International Convention on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, and ask the AICHR to ensure full ratification, and that its provisions are fully implemented in law and in practice.

12. We call on ASEAN to develop a common ASEAN trade policy that:
12.1 defines terms and principles that will govern future trade agreements;
12.2 sets the parameters for levies and renegotiation of existing FTAs and EPAs;
12.3 strengthens parliamentary scrutiny of these agreements;
12.4 opens the negotiation and trade policy process to peoples’ participation; and
12.5 develops a framework on investment regulation, which recognizes the rights of member countries to regulate investments in a manner consistent with determined development needs and priorities.

13. We oppose all speculative activities, especially those related to agricultural products, land, and basic commodities. Governments should develop mechanisms to prevent speculative activities and impose controls on speculative activities in the distribution and re-distribution of resources.

Socio- Cultural Pillar

The primary goal of the ASEAN Socio-Cultural Community (ASCC) is to contribute to the realization of an ASEAN Community that “is people-centered and socially responsible with a view to achieving enduring solidarity and unity among the nations and peoples of ASEAN by forging a common identity and building a caring and sharing society which is inclusive and harmonious where the well-being, livelihood, and welfare of the peoples are enhanced”. The ASCC aims to address the region’s aspiration to lift the quality of life of its peoples through cooperative activities that are people-oriented towards the promotion of sustainable development. While respecting the building of a caring and sharing society in ASEAN, we call on ASEAN to adopt the people-centered which is transformative social agenda that includes the principles of equity, substantive equality, inclusion, solidarity and sustainability.

14. ASEAN must ensure that people live with dignity and a barrier-free society by ensuring delivery of adequate, appropriate, accessible, quality, and essential services for all, especially for poor and vulnerable groups. Such essential services encompass access to employment/livelihood, food, housing, universal healthcare, education, safe and clean water, electricity and social protection pensions and securities.

15. We call on the ASEAN to recognize and respect distinct identities, cultures and ways of life, including indigenous peoples. As a region we must ensure their continuing cultural diversity, collective survival, development, protection against commodification and commercialization. We call on ASEAN to address the issue of statelessness and ensure stateless peoples have access to basic rights and benefits in ASEAN society.

16. The ASEAN Youth Policy must prioritize ensure the participation of young people in related ASEAN processes, universal health care, decent employment, human rights and the development of life skills of children, such as sexual and reproductive health rights education and HIV/AIDS. It must ensure that HIV/AIDS is part of the health and education agenda in all ASEAN countries. It must also promote local wisdom education through youth networking and youth volunteerism.

17. We call on the ASEAN Committee on the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Migrant Workers (ACMW) to refer to the civil society submission on the framework for the protection of migrant workers and their families regardless of status; and ensure that the ASEAN instrument on the protection of migrant workers is a legally binding instrument throughout the region. We reiterate our call in the 1st ASEAN Peoples Forum/4th ASEAN Civil Society Conference to ASEAN member states to ratify the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members and Members of Their Families.

18. The ASEAN Commission of the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Women and Children (ACWC) must be an independent specialised body to promote, protect and fully realise the human rights and fundamental freedoms of women and children in the Southeast Asia. It must uphold the principles of non-discrimination and substantive equality as enshrined in United Nations Convention on the Elimination on the Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), as well as uphold the principles of best interests of the child and children’s participation as enshrined in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC).

19. We acknowledge the ongoing process of establishing ACWC and stress that its Terms of References (TOR) should have balanced protection and promotion mandates. It should be vested with a strong protection mandate with the following mechanisms: on-site country visits, conduct investigations and issue recommendations to a member state. It should also be able to follow-up on those recommendations to the states, receive individual complaints, and institute a mechanism for receiving and addressing complaints. We urge the Working Group on ACWC to ensure the ACWC’s mandate includes that of seeking redress and guarantees of non-recurrence, undertaking independent periodic reviews and monitoring of national laws and policies in order to identify discriminatory laws and policies.

20. The ACWC shall be composed of independent experts selected through a democratic and transparent process with direct participation and consultation with civil society. We are concerned that the non-inclusion of protection mandates sends a signal to children that ASEAN is unwilling and incapable of ensuring their safety and security amidst existing threats they experience – armed conflict, exploitation, cultural degradation, displacement, and lack of access to opportunities.

21. The ACWC must ensure violations of human rights and fundamental freedoms of women and other marginalized groups cannot be justified or legitimized in the name of culture, tradition or so-called “Asian values.”

Political-Security Pillar

The ASEAN Political-Security Community (APSC) envisions the peoples and Member States of ASEAN live in peace with one another and with the world at large in a just, democratic and harmonious environment. It aims to promote political development in adherence to the principles of democracy, the rule of law and good governance, respect for and promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms as inscribed in the ASEAN Charter. APSC shall be “a means by which ASEAN Member States can pursue closer interaction and cooperation to forge shared norms and create common mechanisms to achieve ASEAN’s goals and objectives in the political and security fields”. While appreciating that the APSC mentions the promotion of a people-oriented ASEAN in which all sectors of society, we perceive that the APSC is still state-centric. ASEAN and its member states must work hard to institutionalize its involvement with civil society on political and security issues. Civil society should have a direct and substantive engagement in the national and regional political security community to gather inputs on, assess and assist in the implementation of the blueprint.

22. We applaud the establishment of the AICHR and the open selection process of commissioners by Indonesia and Thailand. AICHR should use its mandate to develop strategies for the promotion and protection of human rights and establish strong mechanisms to protect human rights, including country visits, complaint handling of human rights violations, periodic reviews of the human rights situation in ASEAN member states, and a recourse mechanism against violations.

23. AICHR must encourage ASEAN members to ratify and implement all international mechanisms relevant to human rights standards and appoint an indigenous expert to advise the AICHR on the human rights concerns of indigenous, ethnic, and religious minorities, especially the Rohingya peoples. AICHR must establish a mechanism for consultation between member states and indigenous peoples to address the issues and concerns of indigenous peoples. These consultations can be participated in by concerned UN agencies and national human rights mechanisms.

24. We call on ASEAN to take a more pro-active role in responding to all conflict situations, including Mindanao, South Thailand, West Papua, Burma/Myanmar and the South China Sea. ASEAN must continue to monitor and learn from the post-conflict and peace building challenges in Aceh and Timor Leste.

25. It is also time for ASEAN to seriously address justice, impunity and reconciliation issues, including regressions of democracy in the region.

26. AICHR should immediately investigate ongoing widespread or systematic human rights violations [including criminalization of legitimate community actions], especially situations of systematic rape and other forms of sexual violence and violations commited against women and girl-children, use and/or recruitment of child soldiers, forced labour, extrajudicial killings and other serious human rights violations in affected countries. Countries which commit serious breaches of the charter, including violations of good governance, human rights and the rule of law should be referred to the ASEAN Summit for discussion. We call for AICHR to complement and support the work of mechanisms and representatives of the UN Human Rights Council working on matters of particular relevance to the region, including the Special Rapporteurs on Burma/Myanmar and Cambodia respectively, as well as those working on thematic issues such as torture, violence against women, independence of the judiciary, and human rights defenders.

27. ASEAN must work to promote democratization and establish independent election commissions to ensure free, fair, and clean elections are held in member states. ASEAN must take firm measures to ensure that before the 2010 elections in Myanmar/ Burma, there is genuine political dialogue between all stakeholders, as well as an inclusive review of the unilaterally written 2008 constitution.

28. All political prisoners, including those who are charged under Lese Majeste laws and draconian laws in ASEAN member states must be unconditionally released, especially Aung San Suu Kyi and the over 2,100 political prisoners in Myanmar/ Burma.

29. ASEAN should address the persistent failures and denial of the responsibilities of ASEAN States to refugees, Internally Displaced Peoples (IDPs) and other persons of concern and call on the ASEAN member states to immediately ratify the United Nations Convention on Refugees, and adhere to Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement as well as principles of non-refoulement under international law. ASEAN states should also grant documentation to the stateless, especially to those who have been denied recognition in their countries of origin, such as the Rohingya.

30. APSC needs to further elaborate on its support of a comprehensive approach to security, especially concerning gender mainstreaming – encouraging women’s participation on all levels, especially as agents and decision makers in conflict resolution, and protecting women’s security in their homes, communities, nationally, and regionally.

31. ASEAN must establish legal frameworks that are in accordance with international laws, in order to address issues of armed conflict, develop indicators, and ensure that human rights and human security is guaranteed in all conflict-situations. ASEAN should uphold and institutionalize mechanisms to ensure the upholding of peace-oriented norms, including arms control, the renunciation of use of force, nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction (WMD).

32. ASEAN should work to develop and enhance specific mechanisms to ensure a peaceful ASEAN, including the implementation of the agreed Declaration of Conduct in the South China Sea. ASEAN needs to expand its dispute settlement mechanism to include conflict prevention and post-conflict processes.

33. We call on ASEAN to ensure cultural integrity for all peoples, including respect for languages, and develop mechanisms to resolve and address intra-state conflict, on-going conflicts, emerging threats, and uphold the universal right to self-determination of peoples, including indigenous peoples. ASEAN governments should review their laws and policies to ensure full protection of freedom of expression, association, assembly and religion.

34. ASEAN must end the culture of impunity by strengthening genuine, just and a transparent judicial system, as well as create a mechanism to protect human rights defenders.

Environment Pillar

In response to the urgent, multi-fold environmental crisis and climate change, ASEAN must instigate a process to launch a fourth pillar on Environment in its structure and governance that will place environmental sustainability, economic, gender, social and climate justice at the center of decision-making. ASEAN’s current economic expansion propels the implementation of large-scale development projects, such as mines, dams, nuclear power plants, and industrial plantations that have led to environmental degradation and caused negative impacts on the culture and livelihoods of local and indigenous peoples. Commodification of knowledge, practices and natural resources through trade agreements, investments and patenting has alienated communities, especially indigenous peoples, from the use of their own resources. Collective rights over land, territories and resources continue to be denied and violated in the name of development. The climate crisis brought about by this development model is now an everyday reality, witnessed through increasingly frequent extreme weather events that are impacting the ASEAN region and its peoples and requires an immediate response.

35. We call on ASEAN to recognize that indigenous peoples play a central role in protecting the environment and biodiversity and create mechanisms to ensure accountability for the protection of the environment and communities. We also call on ASEAN governments to sign and implement the Extractive Industry Transparency Initiative (EITI) in order to ensure that natural resources are well managed and used equitably with transparency.

36. The environment pillar should address the gender-differentiated impact, particularly on women, in relation to development projects, climate change and disaster relief management and rehabilitation. Further, patriarchy reinforces the chain of discrimination and multiple forms of rights violations, putting women in a more vulnerable situation such as increased risk in the continuum of sexual violence. In addition, development projects such as mining projects have adverse effect on women’s right to health, particularly their reproductive health rights.

37. We call on ASEAN to:

37.1 Promote and protect rights-based access to resources that respect indigenous land rights, fulfils the principle of non-discrimination and substantive equality, and promotes people’s sovereignty over food, energy, forests, fisheries, land and water, and sustainable farming practices. Large and transnational corporations must be compelled to protect human rights and adhere to international and national environmental human right standards and conventions.
37.2 Apply the ‘precautionary principle’ of Agenda 21, the ‘respect-protect-remedy’ principle of the UN Human Rights Council, and environmental, social and cultural impact assessments for development projects.
37.3 Implement a complete review, and where necessary revision, of economic activities, especially cross-border investments among the member countries to ensure that they comply with the commitments of the new environment pillar.
37.4 Create an ASEAN disaster research centre that will compile geo-hazards assessments of each member states and incorporate local and indigenous knowledge in the formulation of an ASEAN disaster response and mitigation/ adaptation strategy that uphold the principle of on-discrimination with periodic updating and consultation with peoples.
37.5 Ensure necessary relief and protection be accorded to victims of all natural calamities, including those resulting from climate change.
37.6 Establish a blueprint and implementation mechanism to operationalise the environment pillar. An independent regional monitoring mechanism should be established that is mandated to formulate rules on trans-boundary utilization and sharing of natural resources and resolve cross-border impacts where national law is inadequate.
37.7 Demand for the payment of all ecological and climate debts from the developed countries.

Our Commitments

38. We, the people of ASEAN, will continue to mobilize the participation of more grassroots and marginalized communities (such as women, children, indigenous and migrants), peoples’ organizations and civil society organizations to work together in using this platform for interaction and dialogue among the peoples’ of ASEAN.

39. We, in solidarity with the voice of the people of Myanmar/ Burma, call upon the government of Myanmar to take concrete steps towards national reconciliation to ensure that the 2010 elections are truly free and fair and the country can move towards genuine democracy.

40. We commit to continue our unique brand of people-to-people solidarity and dialogue in ensuring a peoples-oriented ASEAN is realised. We will continue to engage with ASEAN governments in 2010 in Vietnam during the 16th ASEAN Summit to monitor and follow up on the peoples’ demands to ASEAN. We call on the Vietnamese government as the next chair of ASEAN and the next host of ASEAN Summit, to support us to maintain and further strengthen the dialogue and broad engagement of civil society with ASEAN.

END

* NOTE OF DISSENT:

The Cambodia-ASEAN Center for Human Rights Development, Cambodia-ASEAN Youth Association, Cambodia-ASEAN Civil Society and Positive Change of Cambodia have submitted a declaration of disagreement for the entire statement, dated 20 October 2009.

Daw Than Nwe, on behalf of 10 organizations from Myanmar submitted a declaration of disagreement for the last sentence of the Paragraph 27 “we cannot accept the words, as well as an inclusive review of unilaterally written 2008 constitution” on 20 October 2009. The organizations are: Union Solidarity and Development Association, Myanmar Anti-Narcotics Association, Myanmar Textiles Entrepreneurs Association, U Win Mra (Director-General –Retired, Ministry of Foreign Affairs), Myanmar Women Affairs Federation, Myanmar Textiles Entrepreneurs Association, Thanlyin Institute of Technology (Senior Officer, Research Division on National Interest), Union of Myanmar Federation of Chamber of Commerce of Industry, Myanmar Women Affairs Federation, Dr. Daw Wah Wah Maung (Lecturer, Yangon Institute of Economics).

20 October 2009, buy prescription 18-21hs, here Cha-am, mind Thailand

This Public Forum was held during the 2nd ASEAN Peoples’ Forum / 5th ASEAN Civil Society Conference 18-20 October 2009 Cha-am, Phetchaburi Province, Thailand

Introduction

Finding solutions to the crises (economic, energy, food, climate and security) is urgent, and today it is at the core of the agenda of both social movements and governments. For countries in the different regions, regional integration appears as a way to overcome the global economic crisis through the development of solidarity and dynamic intra-regional economic ties.

In this context, re-thinking regional integration as a solution to the crisis can give a powerful impulse to building an alternative development project in each region (Latin America, Asia, Africa and Europe) that is more sustainable and equitable than the current development model which countries follow today.

However, the current regional spaces are contested arenas. It is crucial, therefore, that social movements search and seek for common strategies.

The Open Forum will advance the debate and cross-fertilisation of experiences among social movements and civil society organisations from Latin America, Asia and Europe about the possibilities to respond to these crises through regional alternatives and a model of regional integration that promotes a change in the development model of the regions. It will aim to highlight the challenges and possibilities of moving forward in the concretisation of regional alternatives to the economic, financial, food, climate and energy crises that place the interest of people and the planet at its center.

PROGRAMME

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from South East Asia (ASEAN)
Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South/SAPA/ACSC, Philippines

 

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from Latin America
Diana Aguiar, IGTN/REBRIP/Hemispheric Social Alliance, Brazil

 

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from South Asia (SAARC)

Mohammed Mahuruf, People’s SAARC, Sri Lanka

 

European regional responses to the crisis and People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms
Cecilia Olivet, Transnational Institute, Netherlands

Open Forum Discussion: The potential of regional alternatives and the need for cross-regional networking – focus and priorities

Moderator: Aya Fabros, Focus on the Global South, Philippines

 

Co-Convenors:

Focus on the Global South, Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), People’s SAARC, Transnational Institute (TNI) and People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR)

 

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } A:link { color: #0000ff } –>

20 October 2009,
18-21hs, decease Cha-am, thumb Thailand

This Public Forum was held during the 2nd ASEAN Peoples’ Forum / 5th ASEAN Civil Society Conference 18-20 October 2009 Cha-am, Phetchaburi Province, Thailand

Introduction

Finding solutions to the crises (economic, energy, food, climate and security) is urgent, and today it is at the core of the agenda of both social movements and governments. For countries in the different regions, regional integration appears as a way to overcome the global economic crisis through the development of solidarity and dynamic intra-regional economic ties.

In this context, re-thinking regional integration as a solution to the crisis can give a powerful impulse to building an alternative development project in each region (Latin America, Asia, Africa and Europe) that is more sustainable and equitable than the current development model which countries follow today.

However, the current regional spaces are contested arenas. It is crucial, therefore, that social movements search and seek for common strategies.

The Open Forum will advance the debate and cross-fertilisation of experiences among social movements and civil society organisations from Latin America, Asia and Europe about the possibilities to respond to these crises through regional alternatives and a model of regional integration that promotes a change in the development model of the regions. It will aim to highlight the challenges and possibilities of moving forward in the concretisation of regional alternatives to the economic, financial, food, climate and energy crises that place the interest of people and the planet at its center.

PROGRAMME

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from South East Asia (ASEAN)
Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South/SAPA/ACSC, Philippines

 

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from Latin America
Diana Aguiar, IGTN/REBRIP/Hemispheric Social Alliance, Brazil

 

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from South Asia (SAARC)

Mohammed Mahuruf, People’s SAARC, Sri Lanka

 

European regional responses to the crisis and People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms
Cecilia Olivet, Transnational Institute, Netherlands

Open Forum Discussion: The potential of regional alternatives and the need for cross-regional networking – focus and priorities

Moderator: Aya Fabros, Focus on the Global South, Philippines

 

Co-Convenors:

Focus on the Global South, Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), People’s SAARC, Transnational Institute (TNI) and People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR)

 

20 October 2009, 18-21hs, Cha-am, patient Thailand

This Public Forum was held during the 2nd ASEAN Peoples’ Forum / 5th ASEAN Civil Society Conference 18-20 October 2009 Cha-am, Phetchaburi Province, Thailand

Introduction

Finding solutions to the crises (economic, energy, food, climate and security) is urgent, and today it is at the core of the agenda of both social movements and governments. For countries in the different regions, regional integration appears as a way to overcome the global economic crisis through the development of solidarity and dynamic intra-regional economic ties.

In this context, re-thinking regional integration as a solution to the crisis can give a powerful impulse to building an alternative development project in each region (Latin America, Asia, Africa and Europe) that is more sustainable and equitable than the current development model which countries follow today.

However, the current regional spaces are contested arenas. It is crucial, therefore, that social movements search and seek for common strategies.

The Open Forum will advance the debate and cross-fertilisation of experiences among social movements and civil society organisations from Latin America, Asia and Europe about the possibilities to respond to these crises through regional alternatives and a model of regional integration that promotes a change in the development model of the regions. It will aim to highlight the challenges and possibilities of moving forward in the concretisation of regional alternatives to the economic, financial, food, climate and energy crises that place the interest of people and the planet at its center.

PROGRAMME

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from South East Asia (ASEAN)
Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South/SAPA/ACSC, Philippines

 

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from Latin America
Diana Aguiar, IGTN/REBRIP/Hemispheric Social Alliance, Brazil

 

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from South Asia (SAARC)

Mohammed Mahuruf, People’s SAARC, Sri Lanka

 

European regional responses to the crisis and People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms
Cecilia Olivet, Transnational Institute, Netherlands

Open Forum Discussion: The potential of regional alternatives and the need for cross-regional networking – focus and priorities

Moderator: Aya Fabros, Focus on the Global South, Philippines

 

Co-Convenors:

Focus on the Global South, Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), People’s SAARC, Transnational Institute (TNI) and People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR)

 

20 October 2009, look 18-21hs, Cha-am, Thailand

This Public Forum was held during the 2nd ASEAN Peoples’ Forum / 5th ASEAN Civil Society Conference 18-20 October 2009 Cha-am, Phetchaburi Province, Thailand

Introduction

Finding solutions to the crises (economic, energy, food, climate and security) is urgent, and today it is at the core of the agenda of both social movements and governments. For countries in the different regions, regional integration appears as a way to overcome the global economic crisis through the development of solidarity and dynamic intra-regional economic ties.

In this context, re-thinking regional integration as a solution to the crisis can give a powerful impulse to building an alternative development project in each region (Latin America, Asia, Africa and Europe) that is more sustainable and equitable than the current development model which countries follow today.

However, the current regional spaces are contested arenas. It is crucial, therefore, that social movements search and seek for common strategies.

The Open Forum will advance the debate and cross-fertilisation of experiences among social movements and civil society organisations from Latin America, Asia and Europe about the possibilities to respond to these crises through regional alternatives and a model of regional integration that promotes a change in the development model of the regions. It will aim to highlight the challenges and possibilities of moving forward in the concretisation of regional alternatives to the economic, financial, food, climate and energy crises that place the interest of people and the planet at its center.

PROGRAMME

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from South East Asia (ASEAN)
Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South/SAPA/ACSC, Philippines

 

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from Latin America
Diana Aguiar, IGTN/REBRIP/Hemispheric Social Alliance, Brazil

 

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from South Asia (SAARC)

Mohammed Mahuruf, People’s SAARC, Sri Lanka

 

European regional responses to the crisis and People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms
Cecilia Olivet, Transnational Institute, Netherlands

Open Forum Discussion: The potential of regional alternatives and the need for cross-regional networking – focus and priorities

Moderator: Aya Fabros, Focus on the Global South, Philippines

 

Co-Convenors:

Focus on the Global South, Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), People’s SAARC, Transnational Institute (TNI) and People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR)

 

20 October 2009, there 18-21hs, medicine Cha-am, Thailand

This Public Forum was held during the 2nd ASEAN Peoples’ Forum / 5th ASEAN Civil Society Conference 18-20 October 2009 Cha-am, Phetchaburi Province, Thailand

Introduction

Finding solutions to the crises (economic, energy, food, climate and security) is urgent, and today it is at the core of the agenda of both social movements and governments. For countries in the different regions, regional integration appears as a way to overcome the global economic crisis through the development of solidarity and dynamic intra-regional economic ties.

In this context, re-thinking regional integration as a solution to the crisis can give a powerful impulse to building an alternative development project in each region (Latin America, Asia, Africa and Europe) that is more sustainable and equitable than the current development model which countries follow today.

However, the current regional spaces are contested arenas. It is crucial, therefore, that social movements search and seek for common strategies.

The Open Forum will advance the debate and cross-fertilisation of experiences among social movements and civil society organisations from Latin America, Asia and Europe about the possibilities to respond to these crises through regional alternatives and a model of regional integration that promotes a change in the development model of the regions. It will aim to highlight the challenges and possibilities of moving forward in the concretisation of regional alternatives to the economic, financial, food, climate and energy crises that place the interest of people and the planet at its center.

PROGRAMME

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from South East Asia (ASEAN)
Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South/SAPA/ACSC, Philippines

 

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from Latin America
Diana Aguiar, IGTN/REBRIP/Hemispheric Social Alliance, Brazil

 

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from South Asia (SAARC)

Mohammed Mahuruf, People’s SAARC, Sri Lanka

 

European regional responses to the crisis and People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms
Cecilia Olivet, Transnational Institute, Netherlands

Open Forum Discussion: The potential of regional alternatives and the need for cross-regional networking – focus and priorities

Moderator: Aya Fabros, Focus on the Global South, Philippines

 

Co-Convenors:

Focus on the Global South, Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), People’s SAARC, Transnational Institute (TNI) and People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR)

 

Cha-am, Thailand, medical 18 – 20 October 2009

We, pharm
more than 500 delegates at the 2nd ASEAN Peoples’ Forum (APF II) / 5th ASEAN Civil Society Conference (ACSC V), representing various civil society organizations and , movements of workers from rural and urban sectors as well as migrant sector, peasants and farmers, women, children, youth, the elderly, people with disability, urban poor, indigenous peoples, ethnic minorities, fisher folks, stateless persons and other vulnerable groups, gathered together in Cha-am, Thailand, 18-20 October 2009 to discuss the main concerns confronting the peoples of ASEAN and developing key proposals for the 15th ASEAN Summit.

We would like to extend our deepest condolences and solidarity with victims and survivors of the natural disasters currently affecting lives of people in Cambodia, Indonesia, the Philippines, Vietnam, and the Pacific. We call for ASEAN to ensure the protection for the population affected by natural disasters encompasses all relevant guarantees which include civil and political rights as well as economic, social and cultural rights. These rights are attributed to the people through fundamental human rights and international humanitarian law. We urge governments to take concrete measures to eliminate all forms of discrimination, especially against women and minorities, in the relief, humanitarian assistance and development processes following the occurrence of these disasters.

We reaffirm the fundamental principles of democracy, human rights and dignity, good governance, the best interests of the child, meaningful and substantive peoples’ participation, and sustainable development in the pursuit of economic, social, gender and ecological justice so as to bring peace and prosperity to the ASEAN region.

We are deeply disappointed by the absence of our government officials in this meeting. This is a step backward on ASEAN’s commitment to promote a people-oriented ASEAN. It runs contrary to the principles in the ASEAN Charter that encourages people’s participation. We call on ASEAN to recognise the role of civil society and institutionalize people’s participation and engagement in all the ASEAN processes and pillars.

Human conditions and issues confronting the peoples cut across all current pillars of the ASEAN. ASEAN governments must adopt a more holistic approach with regards to development, equal and just treatment of the peoples, and harmonize its policies and practices of all its pillars. Particularly, human rights violations experienced by women and girl-children are often compounded by the intersection of different and multiple layers of discrimination resulting from the intersection of gender with other systems of power, such as race, class/caste, rural location, ethnicity, immigrant status, sexual orientation and gender identities, citizenship, religion and other factors. Furthermore, the principle of free, prior and informed consent of for all peoples, especially indigenous peoples must be pursued in the fulfilment of all political, economic and social agreements under the ASEAN. The ASEAN must ensure that its development initiatives do not further aggravate global warming.

Economic Pillar

The ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) envisions a stable, prosperous and highly competitive region with equitable economic development, reduced poverty and economic disparities through complete liberalization and opening up of the regional economy by 2015. However, this framework of a competitive market economy, which mainly benefits MNCs/TNCs, and developed by ASEAN governments, has impoverished people, undermined, and harmed livelihoods , especially small scale farmers, fishers, and workers in developing countries. This has further exacerbated regional asymmetries and has lead to greater inequality and dispossession. The economic integration model pursued by ASEAN has negatively impacted local and migrant workers and their families, including the undocumented, stateless, and people with HIV/AIDS; especially where working conditions, livelihoods and living standards have deteriorated.

We will work in unity to ensure that all ASEAN workers enjoy basic workers’ rights as outlined in the ILO core labour standards. We urge governments to facilitate dialogue between trade unions, civil society, and employers at national and ASEAN levels.

7 We call on ASEAN to institute rights-based pathways to regularize semi and low-skilled labor migration, reduce barriers to cross-border and internal migration, and guarantee labor protection for informal workers, especially domestic workers. To achieve these objectives, we demand the protection of migrants’ rights regardless of legal status, such as those of undocumented migrant workers. We urge ASEAN governments to respond to the impacts of the global financial crisis in a sustainable way by investing in a strong social economic infrastructure, specifically in the sectors of education, public healthcare, childcare, social insurance and rural areas. This infrastructure should create sustainable growth and long-term employment. Working women comprise 60% of the workforce, are threatened by the financial crisis. We urge the ASEAN to take immediate steps to extend social protection to women workers.

We ask ASEAN to support and cooperate with the peoples to conduct independent and strategic assessments in trade and investment agreements, projects, and industrial processes before they are negotiated. They should use the following assessments: Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), Social Impact Assessment (SIA), Human Impact Assessment (HIA) and gender impact assessment. Any trading agreement must not have a negative impact on access to medicine and medical treatment.

ASEAN must enforce fundamental rights of people to access medical treatment including medical technology and medicine. Therefore, any trading agreement must not have a negative impact on such access.

We urge ASEAN to give priority to building a people’s community, supporting grassroots economies and peoples’ livelihoods, including traditional occupations. We reject the unbridled liberalization of investments in intensive industrial agriculture in the sector of land and marine aquaculture that gives MNCs and TNCs undue control over fisheries, forests farmlands, and other natural resources. It should invest in building people’s capacity to participate in the decision making processes in trade and investment activities instead of favoring MNCs and TNCs. Its economic policies must be responsive to sensitive sectors such as food security, and must reject investment liberalization in the sectors of agriculture, aqua culture, both marine and inland, and forestry.

10. We call on the attention and action of ASEAN to the cause of small fisherfolk. The Coral Triangle Initiative (CTI) in particular has the objective of preserving fishing grounds in the region yet there is no consultation with small fishers. The millions of fisherfolk, especially in the South China Sea, must be heard and supported by ASEAN. Further, we reiterate our call on ASEAN to come up with a Council for Small Farmers, Fishers, Social Entrepreneurs and Producers and create agricultural policies that uphold the rights of small farmers, food sovereignty, and protect land rights.

11. We call upon all ASEAN states that have not done so to ratify the International Convention on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, and ask the AICHR to ensure full ratification, and that its provisions are fully implemented in law and in practice.

12. We call on ASEAN to develop a common ASEAN trade policy that:
12.1 defines terms and principles that will govern future trade agreements;
12.2 sets the parameters for levies and renegotiation of existing FTAs and EPAs;
12.3 strengthens parliamentary scrutiny of these agreements;
12.4 opens the negotiation and trade policy process to peoples’ participation; and
12.5 develops a framework on investment regulation, which recognizes the rights of member countries to regulate investments in a manner consistent with determined development needs and priorities.

13. We oppose all speculative activities, especially those related to agricultural products, land, and basic commodities. Governments should develop mechanisms to prevent speculative activities and impose controls on speculative activities in the distribution and re-distribution of resources.

Socio- Cultural Pillar

The primary goal of the ASEAN Socio-Cultural Community (ASCC) is to contribute to the realization of an ASEAN Community that “is people-centered and socially responsible with a view to achieving enduring solidarity and unity among the nations and peoples of ASEAN by forging a common identity and building a caring and sharing society which is inclusive and harmonious where the well-being, livelihood, and welfare of the peoples are enhanced”. The ASCC aims to address the region’s aspiration to lift the quality of life of its peoples through cooperative activities that are people-oriented towards the promotion of sustainable development. While respecting the building of a caring and sharing society in ASEAN, we call on ASEAN to adopt the people-centered which is transformative social agenda that includes the principles of equity, substantive equality, inclusion, solidarity and sustainability.

14. ASEAN must ensure that people live with dignity and a barrier-free society by ensuring delivery of adequate, appropriate, accessible, quality, and essential services for all, especially for poor and vulnerable groups. Such essential services encompass access to employment/livelihood, food, housing, universal healthcare, education, safe and clean water, electricity and social protection pensions and securities.

15. We call on the ASEAN to recognize and respect distinct identities, cultures and ways of life, including indigenous peoples. As a region we must ensure their continuing cultural diversity, collective survival, development, protection against commodification and commercialization. We call on ASEAN to address the issue of statelessness and ensure stateless peoples have access to basic rights and benefits in ASEAN society.

16. The ASEAN Youth Policy must prioritize ensure the participation of young people in related ASEAN processes, universal health care, decent employment, human rights and the development of life skills of children, such as sexual and reproductive health rights education and HIV/AIDS. It must ensure that HIV/AIDS is part of the health and education agenda in all ASEAN countries. It must also promote local wisdom education through youth networking and youth volunteerism.

17. We call on the ASEAN Committee on the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Migrant Workers (ACMW) to refer to the civil society submission on the framework for the protection of migrant workers and their families regardless of status; and ensure that the ASEAN instrument on the protection of migrant workers is a legally binding instrument throughout the region. We reiterate our call in the 1st ASEAN Peoples Forum/4th ASEAN Civil Society Conference to ASEAN member states to ratify the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members and Members of Their Families.

18. The ASEAN Commission of the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Women and Children (ACWC) must be an independent specialised body to promote, protect and fully realise the human rights and fundamental freedoms of women and children in the Southeast Asia. It must uphold the principles of non-discrimination and substantive equality as enshrined in United Nations Convention on the Elimination on the Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), as well as uphold the principles of best interests of the child and children’s participation as enshrined in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC).

19. We acknowledge the ongoing process of establishing ACWC and stress that its Terms of References (TOR) should have balanced protection and promotion mandates. It should be vested with a strong protection mandate with the following mechanisms: on-site country visits, conduct investigations and issue recommendations to a member state. It should also be able to follow-up on those recommendations to the states, receive individual complaints, and institute a mechanism for receiving and addressing complaints. We urge the Working Group on ACWC to ensure the ACWC’s mandate includes that of seeking redress and guarantees of non-recurrence, undertaking independent periodic reviews and monitoring of national laws and policies in order to identify discriminatory laws and policies.

20. The ACWC shall be composed of independent experts selected through a democratic and transparent process with direct participation and consultation with civil society. We are concerned that the non-inclusion of protection mandates sends a signal to children that ASEAN is unwilling and incapable of ensuring their safety and security amidst existing threats they experience – armed conflict, exploitation, cultural degradation, displacement, and lack of access to opportunities.

21. The ACWC must ensure violations of human rights and fundamental freedoms of women and other marginalized groups cannot be justified or legitimized in the name of culture, tradition or so-called “Asian values.”

Political-Security Pillar

The ASEAN Political-Security Community (APSC) envisions the peoples and Member States of ASEAN live in peace with one another and with the world at large in a just, democratic and harmonious environment. It aims to promote political development in adherence to the principles of democracy, the rule of law and good governance, respect for and promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms as inscribed in the ASEAN Charter. APSC shall be “a means by which ASEAN Member States can pursue closer interaction and cooperation to forge shared norms and create common mechanisms to achieve ASEAN’s goals and objectives in the political and security fields”. While appreciating that the APSC mentions the promotion of a people-oriented ASEAN in which all sectors of society, we perceive that the APSC is still state-centric. ASEAN and its member states must work hard to institutionalize its involvement with civil society on political and security issues. Civil society should have a direct and substantive engagement in the national and regional political security community to gather inputs on, assess and assist in the implementation of the blueprint.

22. We applaud the establishment of the AICHR and the open selection process of commissioners by Indonesia and Thailand. AICHR should use its mandate to develop strategies for the promotion and protection of human rights and establish strong mechanisms to protect human rights, including country visits, complaint handling of human rights violations, periodic reviews of the human rights situation in ASEAN member states, and a recourse mechanism against violations.

23. AICHR must encourage ASEAN members to ratify and implement all international mechanisms relevant to human rights standards and appoint an indigenous expert to advise the AICHR on the human rights concerns of indigenous, ethnic, and religious minorities, especially the Rohingya peoples. AICHR must establish a mechanism for consultation between member states and indigenous peoples to address the issues and concerns of indigenous peoples. These consultations can be participated in by concerned UN agencies and national human rights mechanisms.

24. We call on ASEAN to take a more pro-active role in responding to all conflict situations, including Mindanao, South Thailand, West Papua, Burma/Myanmar and the South China Sea. ASEAN must continue to monitor and learn from the post-conflict and peace building challenges in Aceh and Timor Leste.

25. It is also time for ASEAN to seriously address justice, impunity and reconciliation issues, including regressions of democracy in the region.

26. AICHR should immediately investigate ongoing widespread or systematic human rights violations [including criminalization of legitimate community actions], especially situations of systematic rape and other forms of sexual violence and violations commited against women and girl-children, use and/or recruitment of child soldiers, forced labour, extrajudicial killings and other serious human rights violations in affected countries. Countries which commit serious breaches of the charter, including violations of good governance, human rights and the rule of law should be referred to the ASEAN Summit for discussion. We call for AICHR to complement and support the work of mechanisms and representatives of the UN Human Rights Council working on matters of particular relevance to the region, including the Special Rapporteurs on Burma/Myanmar and Cambodia respectively, as well as those working on thematic issues such as torture, violence against women, independence of the judiciary, and human rights defenders.

27. ASEAN must work to promote democratization and establish independent election commissions to ensure free, fair, and clean elections are held in member states. ASEAN must take firm measures to ensure that before the 2010 elections in Myanmar/ Burma, there is genuine political dialogue between all stakeholders, as well as an inclusive review of the unilaterally written 2008 constitution.

28. All political prisoners, including those who are charged under Lese Majeste laws and draconian laws in ASEAN member states must be unconditionally released, especially Aung San Suu Kyi and the over 2,100 political prisoners in Myanmar/ Burma.

29. ASEAN should address the persistent failures and denial of the responsibilities of ASEAN States to refugees, Internally Displaced Peoples (IDPs) and other persons of concern and call on the ASEAN member states to immediately ratify the United Nations Convention on Refugees, and adhere to Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement as well as principles of non-refoulement under international law. ASEAN states should also grant documentation to the stateless, especially to those who have been denied recognition in their countries of origin, such as the Rohingya.

30. APSC needs to further elaborate on its support of a comprehensive approach to security, especially concerning gender mainstreaming – encouraging women’s participation on all levels, especially as agents and decision makers in conflict resolution, and protecting women’s security in their homes, communities, nationally, and regionally.

31. ASEAN must establish legal frameworks that are in accordance with international laws, in order to address issues of armed conflict, develop indicators, and ensure that human rights and human security is guaranteed in all conflict-situations. ASEAN should uphold and institutionalize mechanisms to ensure the upholding of peace-oriented norms, including arms control, the renunciation of use of force, nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction (WMD).

32. ASEAN should work to develop and enhance specific mechanisms to ensure a peaceful ASEAN, including the implementation of the agreed Declaration of Conduct in the South China Sea. ASEAN needs to expand its dispute settlement mechanism to include conflict prevention and post-conflict processes.

33. We call on ASEAN to ensure cultural integrity for all peoples, including respect for languages, and develop mechanisms to resolve and address intra-state conflict, on-going conflicts, emerging threats, and uphold the universal right to self-determination of peoples, including indigenous peoples. ASEAN governments should review their laws and policies to ensure full protection of freedom of expression, association, assembly and religion.

34. ASEAN must end the culture of impunity by strengthening genuine, just and a transparent judicial system, as well as create a mechanism to protect human rights defenders.

Environment Pillar

In response to the urgent, multi-fold environmental crisis and climate change, ASEAN must instigate a process to launch a fourth pillar on Environment in its structure and governance that will place environmental sustainability, economic, gender, social and climate justice at the center of decision-making. ASEAN’s current economic expansion propels the implementation of large-scale development projects, such as mines, dams, nuclear power plants, and industrial plantations that have led to environmental degradation and caused negative impacts on the culture and livelihoods of local and indigenous peoples. Commodification of knowledge, practices and natural resources through trade agreements, investments and patenting has alienated communities, especially indigenous peoples, from the use of their own resources. Collective rights over land, territories and resources continue to be denied and violated in the name of development. The climate crisis brought about by this development model is now an everyday reality, witnessed through increasingly frequent extreme weather events that are impacting the ASEAN region and its peoples and requires an immediate response.

35. We call on ASEAN to recognize that indigenous peoples play a central role in protecting the environment and biodiversity and create mechanisms to ensure accountability for the protection of the environment and communities. We also call on ASEAN governments to sign and implement the Extractive Industry Transparency Initiative (EITI) in order to ensure that natural resources are well managed and used equitably with transparency.

36. The environment pillar should address the gender-differentiated impact, particularly on women, in relation to development projects, climate change and disaster relief management and rehabilitation. Further, patriarchy reinforces the chain of discrimination and multiple forms of rights violations, putting women in a more vulnerable situation such as increased risk in the continuum of sexual violence. In addition, development projects such as mining projects have adverse effect on women’s right to health, particularly their reproductive health rights.

37. We call on ASEAN to:

37.1 Promote and protect rights-based access to resources that respect indigenous land rights, fulfils the principle of non-discrimination and substantive equality, and promotes people’s sovereignty over food, energy, forests, fisheries, land and water, and sustainable farming practices. Large and transnational corporations must be compelled to protect human rights and adhere to international and national environmental human right standards and conventions.
37.2 Apply the ‘precautionary principle’ of Agenda 21, the ‘respect-protect-remedy’ principle of the UN Human Rights Council, and environmental, social and cultural impact assessments for development projects.
37.3 Implement a complete review, and where necessary revision, of economic activities, especially cross-border investments among the member countries to ensure that they comply with the commitments of the new environment pillar.
37.4 Create an ASEAN disaster research centre that will compile geo-hazards assessments of each member states and incorporate local and indigenous knowledge in the formulation of an ASEAN disaster response and mitigation/ adaptation strategy that uphold the principle of on-discrimination with periodic updating and consultation with peoples.
37.5 Ensure necessary relief and protection be accorded to victims of all natural calamities, including those resulting from climate change.
37.6 Establish a blueprint and implementation mechanism to operationalise the environment pillar. An independent regional monitoring mechanism should be established that is mandated to formulate rules on trans-boundary utilization and sharing of natural resources and resolve cross-border impacts where national law is inadequate.
37.7 Demand for the payment of all ecological and climate debts from the developed countries.

Our Commitments

38. We, the people of ASEAN, will continue to mobilize the participation of more grassroots and marginalized communities (such as women, children, indigenous and migrants), peoples’ organizations and civil society organizations to work together in using this platform for interaction and dialogue among the peoples’ of ASEAN.

39. We, in solidarity with the voice of the people of Myanmar/ Burma, call upon the government of Myanmar to take concrete steps towards national reconciliation to ensure that the 2010 elections are truly free and fair and the country can move towards genuine democracy.

40. We commit to continue our unique brand of people-to-people solidarity and dialogue in ensuring a peoples-oriented ASEAN is realised. We will continue to engage with ASEAN governments in 2010 in Vietnam during the 16th ASEAN Summit to monitor and follow up on the peoples’ demands to ASEAN. We call on the Vietnamese government as the next chair of ASEAN and the next host of ASEAN Summit, to support us to maintain and further strengthen the dialogue and broad engagement of civil society with ASEAN.

END

* NOTE OF DISSENT:

The Cambodia-ASEAN Center for Human Rights Development, Cambodia-ASEAN Youth Association, Cambodia-ASEAN Civil Society and Positive Change of Cambodia have submitted a declaration of disagreement for the entire statement, dated 20 October 2009.

Daw Than Nwe, on behalf of 10 organizations from Myanmar submitted a declaration of disagreement for the last sentence of the Paragraph 27 “we cannot accept the words, as well as an inclusive review of unilaterally written 2008 constitution” on 20 October 2009. The organizations are: Union Solidarity and Development Association, Myanmar Anti-Narcotics Association, Myanmar Textiles Entrepreneurs Association, U Win Mra (Director-General –Retired, Ministry of Foreign Affairs), Myanmar Women Affairs Federation, Myanmar Textiles Entrepreneurs Association, Thanlyin Institute of Technology (Senior Officer, Research Division on National Interest), Union of Myanmar Federation of Chamber of Commerce of Industry, Myanmar Women Affairs Federation, Dr. Daw Wah Wah Maung (Lecturer, Yangon Institute of Economics).

Cha-am, shop Thailand, no rx 18 – 20 October 2009

We, more than 500 delegates at the 2nd ASEAN Peoples’ Forum (APF II) / 5th ASEAN Civil Society Conference (ACSC V), representing various civil society organizations and , movements of workers from rural and urban sectors as well as migrant sector, peasants and farmers, women, children, youth, the elderly, people with disability, urban poor, indigenous peoples, ethnic minorities, fisher folks, stateless persons and other vulnerable groups, gathered together in Cha-am, Thailand, 18-20 October 2009 to discuss the main concerns confronting the peoples of ASEAN and developing key proposals for the 15th ASEAN Summit.

We would like to extend our deepest condolences and solidarity with victims and survivors of the natural disasters currently affecting lives of people in Cambodia, Indonesia, the Philippines, Vietnam, and the Pacific. We call for ASEAN to ensure the protection for the population affected by natural disasters encompasses all relevant guarantees which include civil and political rights as well as economic, social and cultural rights. These rights are attributed to the people through fundamental human rights and international humanitarian law. We urge governments to take concrete measures to eliminate all forms of discrimination, especially against women and minorities, in the relief, humanitarian assistance and development processes following the occurrence of these disasters.

We reaffirm the fundamental principles of democracy, human rights and dignity, good governance, the best interests of the child, meaningful and substantive peoples’ participation, and sustainable development in the pursuit of economic, social, gender and ecological justice so as to bring peace and prosperity to the ASEAN region.

We are deeply disappointed by the absence of our government officials in this meeting. This is a step backward on ASEAN’s commitment to promote a people-oriented ASEAN. It runs contrary to the principles in the ASEAN Charter that encourages people’s participation. We call on ASEAN to recognise the role of civil society and institutionalize people’s participation and engagement in all the ASEAN processes and pillars.

Human conditions and issues confronting the peoples cut across all current pillars of the ASEAN. ASEAN governments must adopt a more holistic approach with regards to development, equal and just treatment of the peoples, and harmonize its policies and practices of all its pillars. Particularly, human rights violations experienced by women and girl-children are often compounded by the intersection of different and multiple layers of discrimination resulting from the intersection of gender with other systems of power, such as race, class/caste, rural location, ethnicity, immigrant status, sexual orientation and gender identities, citizenship, religion and other factors. Furthermore, the principle of free, prior and informed consent of for all peoples, especially indigenous peoples must be pursued in the fulfilment of all political, economic and social agreements under the ASEAN. The ASEAN must ensure that its development initiatives do not further aggravate global warming.

Economic Pillar

The ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) envisions a stable, prosperous and highly competitive region with equitable economic development, reduced poverty and economic disparities through complete liberalization and opening up of the regional economy by 2015. However, this framework of a competitive market economy, which mainly benefits MNCs/TNCs, and developed by ASEAN governments, has impoverished people, undermined, and harmed livelihoods , especially small scale farmers, fishers, and workers in developing countries. This has further exacerbated regional asymmetries and has lead to greater inequality and dispossession. The economic integration model pursued by ASEAN has negatively impacted local and migrant workers and their families, including the undocumented, stateless, and people with HIV/AIDS; especially where working conditions, livelihoods and living standards have deteriorated.

We will work in unity to ensure that all ASEAN workers enjoy basic workers’ rights as outlined in the ILO core labour standards. We urge governments to facilitate dialogue between trade unions, civil society, and employers at national and ASEAN levels.

7 We call on ASEAN to institute rights-based pathways to regularize semi and low-skilled labor migration, reduce barriers to cross-border and internal migration, and guarantee labor protection for informal workers, especially domestic workers. To achieve these objectives, we demand the protection of migrants’ rights regardless of legal status, such as those of undocumented migrant workers. We urge ASEAN governments to respond to the impacts of the global financial crisis in a sustainable way by investing in a strong social economic infrastructure, specifically in the sectors of education, public healthcare, childcare, social insurance and rural areas. This infrastructure should create sustainable growth and long-term employment. Working women comprise 60% of the workforce, are threatened by the financial crisis. We urge the ASEAN to take immediate steps to extend social protection to women workers.

We ask ASEAN to support and cooperate with the peoples to conduct independent and strategic assessments in trade and investment agreements, projects, and industrial processes before they are negotiated. They should use the following assessments: Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), Social Impact Assessment (SIA), Human Impact Assessment (HIA) and gender impact assessment. Any trading agreement must not have a negative impact on access to medicine and medical treatment.

ASEAN must enforce fundamental rights of people to access medical treatment including medical technology and medicine. Therefore, any trading agreement must not have a negative impact on such access.

We urge ASEAN to give priority to building a people’s community, supporting grassroots economies and peoples’ livelihoods, including traditional occupations. We reject the unbridled liberalization of investments in intensive industrial agriculture in the sector of land and marine aquaculture that gives MNCs and TNCs undue control over fisheries, forests farmlands, and other natural resources. It should invest in building people’s capacity to participate in the decision making processes in trade and investment activities instead of favoring MNCs and TNCs. Its economic policies must be responsive to sensitive sectors such as food security, and must reject investment liberalization in the sectors of agriculture, aqua culture, both marine and inland, and forestry.

10. We call on the attention and action of ASEAN to the cause of small fisherfolk. The Coral Triangle Initiative (CTI) in particular has the objective of preserving fishing grounds in the region yet there is no consultation with small fishers. The millions of fisherfolk, especially in the South China Sea, must be heard and supported by ASEAN. Further, we reiterate our call on ASEAN to come up with a Council for Small Farmers, Fishers, Social Entrepreneurs and Producers and create agricultural policies that uphold the rights of small farmers, food sovereignty, and protect land rights.

11. We call upon all ASEAN states that have not done so to ratify the International Convention on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, and ask the AICHR to ensure full ratification, and that its provisions are fully implemented in law and in practice.

12. We call on ASEAN to develop a common ASEAN trade policy that:
12.1 defines terms and principles that will govern future trade agreements;
12.2 sets the parameters for levies and renegotiation of existing FTAs and EPAs;
12.3 strengthens parliamentary scrutiny of these agreements;
12.4 opens the negotiation and trade policy process to peoples’ participation; and
12.5 develops a framework on investment regulation, which recognizes the rights of member countries to regulate investments in a manner consistent with determined development needs and priorities.

13. We oppose all speculative activities, especially those related to agricultural products, land, and basic commodities. Governments should develop mechanisms to prevent speculative activities and impose controls on speculative activities in the distribution and re-distribution of resources.

Socio- Cultural Pillar

The primary goal of the ASEAN Socio-Cultural Community (ASCC) is to contribute to the realization of an ASEAN Community that “is people-centered and socially responsible with a view to achieving enduring solidarity and unity among the nations and peoples of ASEAN by forging a common identity and building a caring and sharing society which is inclusive and harmonious where the well-being, livelihood, and welfare of the peoples are enhanced”. The ASCC aims to address the region’s aspiration to lift the quality of life of its peoples through cooperative activities that are people-oriented towards the promotion of sustainable development. While respecting the building of a caring and sharing society in ASEAN, we call on ASEAN to adopt the people-centered which is transformative social agenda that includes the principles of equity, substantive equality, inclusion, solidarity and sustainability.

14. ASEAN must ensure that people live with dignity and a barrier-free society by ensuring delivery of adequate, appropriate, accessible, quality, and essential services for all, especially for poor and vulnerable groups. Such essential services encompass access to employment/livelihood, food, housing, universal healthcare, education, safe and clean water, electricity and social protection pensions and securities.

15. We call on the ASEAN to recognize and respect distinct identities, cultures and ways of life, including indigenous peoples. As a region we must ensure their continuing cultural diversity, collective survival, development, protection against commodification and commercialization. We call on ASEAN to address the issue of statelessness and ensure stateless peoples have access to basic rights and benefits in ASEAN society.

16. The ASEAN Youth Policy must prioritize ensure the participation of young people in related ASEAN processes, universal health care, decent employment, human rights and the development of life skills of children, such as sexual and reproductive health rights education and HIV/AIDS. It must ensure that HIV/AIDS is part of the health and education agenda in all ASEAN countries. It must also promote local wisdom education through youth networking and youth volunteerism.

17. We call on the ASEAN Committee on the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Migrant Workers (ACMW) to refer to the civil society submission on the framework for the protection of migrant workers and their families regardless of status; and ensure that the ASEAN instrument on the protection of migrant workers is a legally binding instrument throughout the region. We reiterate our call in the 1st ASEAN Peoples Forum/4th ASEAN Civil Society Conference to ASEAN member states to ratify the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members and Members of Their Families.

18. The ASEAN Commission of the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Women and Children (ACWC) must be an independent specialised body to promote, protect and fully realise the human rights and fundamental freedoms of women and children in the Southeast Asia. It must uphold the principles of non-discrimination and substantive equality as enshrined in United Nations Convention on the Elimination on the Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), as well as uphold the principles of best interests of the child and children’s participation as enshrined in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC).

19. We acknowledge the ongoing process of establishing ACWC and stress that its Terms of References (TOR) should have balanced protection and promotion mandates. It should be vested with a strong protection mandate with the following mechanisms: on-site country visits, conduct investigations and issue recommendations to a member state. It should also be able to follow-up on those recommendations to the states, receive individual complaints, and institute a mechanism for receiving and addressing complaints. We urge the Working Group on ACWC to ensure the ACWC’s mandate includes that of seeking redress and guarantees of non-recurrence, undertaking independent periodic reviews and monitoring of national laws and policies in order to identify discriminatory laws and policies.

20. The ACWC shall be composed of independent experts selected through a democratic and transparent process with direct participation and consultation with civil society. We are concerned that the non-inclusion of protection mandates sends a signal to children that ASEAN is unwilling and incapable of ensuring their safety and security amidst existing threats they experience – armed conflict, exploitation, cultural degradation, displacement, and lack of access to opportunities.

21. The ACWC must ensure violations of human rights and fundamental freedoms of women and other marginalized groups cannot be justified or legitimized in the name of culture, tradition or so-called “Asian values.”

Political-Security Pillar

The ASEAN Political-Security Community (APSC) envisions the peoples and Member States of ASEAN live in peace with one another and with the world at large in a just, democratic and harmonious environment. It aims to promote political development in adherence to the principles of democracy, the rule of law and good governance, respect for and promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms as inscribed in the ASEAN Charter. APSC shall be “a means by which ASEAN Member States can pursue closer interaction and cooperation to forge shared norms and create common mechanisms to achieve ASEAN’s goals and objectives in the political and security fields”. While appreciating that the APSC mentions the promotion of a people-oriented ASEAN in which all sectors of society, we perceive that the APSC is still state-centric. ASEAN and its member states must work hard to institutionalize its involvement with civil society on political and security issues. Civil society should have a direct and substantive engagement in the national and regional political security community to gather inputs on, assess and assist in the implementation of the blueprint.

22. We applaud the establishment of the AICHR and the open selection process of commissioners by Indonesia and Thailand. AICHR should use its mandate to develop strategies for the promotion and protection of human rights and establish strong mechanisms to protect human rights, including country visits, complaint handling of human rights violations, periodic reviews of the human rights situation in ASEAN member states, and a recourse mechanism against violations.

23. AICHR must encourage ASEAN members to ratify and implement all international mechanisms relevant to human rights standards and appoint an indigenous expert to advise the AICHR on the human rights concerns of indigenous, ethnic, and religious minorities, especially the Rohingya peoples. AICHR must establish a mechanism for consultation between member states and indigenous peoples to address the issues and concerns of indigenous peoples. These consultations can be participated in by concerned UN agencies and national human rights mechanisms.

24. We call on ASEAN to take a more pro-active role in responding to all conflict situations, including Mindanao, South Thailand, West Papua, Burma/Myanmar and the South China Sea. ASEAN must continue to monitor and learn from the post-conflict and peace building challenges in Aceh and Timor Leste.

25. It is also time for ASEAN to seriously address justice, impunity and reconciliation issues, including regressions of democracy in the region.

26. AICHR should immediately investigate ongoing widespread or systematic human rights violations [including criminalization of legitimate community actions], especially situations of systematic rape and other forms of sexual violence and violations commited against women and girl-children, use and/or recruitment of child soldiers, forced labour, extrajudicial killings and other serious human rights violations in affected countries. Countries which commit serious breaches of the charter, including violations of good governance, human rights and the rule of law should be referred to the ASEAN Summit for discussion. We call for AICHR to complement and support the work of mechanisms and representatives of the UN Human Rights Council working on matters of particular relevance to the region, including the Special Rapporteurs on Burma/Myanmar and Cambodia respectively, as well as those working on thematic issues such as torture, violence against women, independence of the judiciary, and human rights defenders.

27. ASEAN must work to promote democratization and establish independent election commissions to ensure free, fair, and clean elections are held in member states. ASEAN must take firm measures to ensure that before the 2010 elections in Myanmar/ Burma, there is genuine political dialogue between all stakeholders, as well as an inclusive review of the unilaterally written 2008 constitution.

28. All political prisoners, including those who are charged under Lese Majeste laws and draconian laws in ASEAN member states must be unconditionally released, especially Aung San Suu Kyi and the over 2,100 political prisoners in Myanmar/ Burma.

29. ASEAN should address the persistent failures and denial of the responsibilities of ASEAN States to refugees, Internally Displaced Peoples (IDPs) and other persons of concern and call on the ASEAN member states to immediately ratify the United Nations Convention on Refugees, and adhere to Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement as well as principles of non-refoulement under international law. ASEAN states should also grant documentation to the stateless, especially to those who have been denied recognition in their countries of origin, such as the Rohingya.

30. APSC needs to further elaborate on its support of a comprehensive approach to security, especially concerning gender mainstreaming – encouraging women’s participation on all levels, especially as agents and decision makers in conflict resolution, and protecting women’s security in their homes, communities, nationally, and regionally.

31. ASEAN must establish legal frameworks that are in accordance with international laws, in order to address issues of armed conflict, develop indicators, and ensure that human rights and human security is guaranteed in all conflict-situations. ASEAN should uphold and institutionalize mechanisms to ensure the upholding of peace-oriented norms, including arms control, the renunciation of use of force, nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction (WMD).

32. ASEAN should work to develop and enhance specific mechanisms to ensure a peaceful ASEAN, including the implementation of the agreed Declaration of Conduct in the South China Sea. ASEAN needs to expand its dispute settlement mechanism to include conflict prevention and post-conflict processes.

33. We call on ASEAN to ensure cultural integrity for all peoples, including respect for languages, and develop mechanisms to resolve and address intra-state conflict, on-going conflicts, emerging threats, and uphold the universal right to self-determination of peoples, including indigenous peoples. ASEAN governments should review their laws and policies to ensure full protection of freedom of expression, association, assembly and religion.

34. ASEAN must end the culture of impunity by strengthening genuine, just and a transparent judicial system, as well as create a mechanism to protect human rights defenders.

Environment Pillar

In response to the urgent, multi-fold environmental crisis and climate change, ASEAN must instigate a process to launch a fourth pillar on Environment in its structure and governance that will place environmental sustainability, economic, gender, social and climate justice at the center of decision-making. ASEAN’s current economic expansion propels the implementation of large-scale development projects, such as mines, dams, nuclear power plants, and industrial plantations that have led to environmental degradation and caused negative impacts on the culture and livelihoods of local and indigenous peoples. Commodification of knowledge, practices and natural resources through trade agreements, investments and patenting has alienated communities, especially indigenous peoples, from the use of their own resources. Collective rights over land, territories and resources continue to be denied and violated in the name of development. The climate crisis brought about by this development model is now an everyday reality, witnessed through increasingly frequent extreme weather events that are impacting the ASEAN region and its peoples and requires an immediate response.

35. We call on ASEAN to recognize that indigenous peoples play a central role in protecting the environment and biodiversity and create mechanisms to ensure accountability for the protection of the environment and communities. We also call on ASEAN governments to sign and implement the Extractive Industry Transparency Initiative (EITI) in order to ensure that natural resources are well managed and used equitably with transparency.

36. The environment pillar should address the gender-differentiated impact, particularly on women, in relation to development projects, climate change and disaster relief management and rehabilitation. Further, patriarchy reinforces the chain of discrimination and multiple forms of rights violations, putting women in a more vulnerable situation such as increased risk in the continuum of sexual violence. In addition, development projects such as mining projects have adverse effect on women’s right to health, particularly their reproductive health rights.

37. We call on ASEAN to:

37.1 Promote and protect rights-based access to resources that respect indigenous land rights, fulfils the principle of non-discrimination and substantive equality, and promotes people’s sovereignty over food, energy, forests, fisheries, land and water, and sustainable farming practices. Large and transnational corporations must be compelled to protect human rights and adhere to international and national environmental human right standards and conventions.
37.2 Apply the ‘precautionary principle’ of Agenda 21, the ‘respect-protect-remedy’ principle of the UN Human Rights Council, and environmental, social and cultural impact assessments for development projects.
37.3 Implement a complete review, and where necessary revision, of economic activities, especially cross-border investments among the member countries to ensure that they comply with the commitments of the new environment pillar.
37.4 Create an ASEAN disaster research centre that will compile geo-hazards assessments of each member states and incorporate local and indigenous knowledge in the formulation of an ASEAN disaster response and mitigation/ adaptation strategy that uphold the principle of on-discrimination with periodic updating and consultation with peoples.
37.5 Ensure necessary relief and protection be accorded to victims of all natural calamities, including those resulting from climate change.
37.6 Establish a blueprint and implementation mechanism to operationalise the environment pillar. An independent regional monitoring mechanism should be established that is mandated to formulate rules on trans-boundary utilization and sharing of natural resources and resolve cross-border impacts where national law is inadequate.
37.7 Demand for the payment of all ecological and climate debts from the developed countries.

Our Commitments

38. We, the people of ASEAN, will continue to mobilize the participation of more grassroots and marginalized communities (such as women, children, indigenous and migrants), peoples’ organizations and civil society organizations to work together in using this platform for interaction and dialogue among the peoples’ of ASEAN.

39. We, in solidarity with the voice of the people of Myanmar/ Burma, call upon the government of Myanmar to take concrete steps towards national reconciliation to ensure that the 2010 elections are truly free and fair and the country can move towards genuine democracy.

40. We commit to continue our unique brand of people-to-people solidarity and dialogue in ensuring a peoples-oriented ASEAN is realised. We will continue to engage with ASEAN governments in 2010 in Vietnam during the 16th ASEAN Summit to monitor and follow up on the peoples’ demands to ASEAN. We call on the Vietnamese government as the next chair of ASEAN and the next host of ASEAN Summit, to support us to maintain and further strengthen the dialogue and broad engagement of civil society with ASEAN.

END

* NOTE OF DISSENT:

The Cambodia-ASEAN Center for Human Rights Development, Cambodia-ASEAN Youth Association, Cambodia-ASEAN Civil Society and Positive Change of Cambodia have submitted a declaration of disagreement for the entire statement, dated 20 October 2009.

Daw Than Nwe, on behalf of 10 organizations from Myanmar submitted a declaration of disagreement for the last sentence of the Paragraph 27 “we cannot accept the words, as well as an inclusive review of unilaterally written 2008 constitution” on 20 October 2009. The organizations are: Union Solidarity and Development Association, Myanmar Anti-Narcotics Association, Myanmar Textiles Entrepreneurs Association, U Win Mra (Director-General –Retired, Ministry of Foreign Affairs), Myanmar Women Affairs Federation, Myanmar Textiles Entrepreneurs Association, Thanlyin Institute of Technology (Senior Officer, Research Division on National Interest), Union of Myanmar Federation of Chamber of Commerce of Industry, Myanmar Women Affairs Federation, Dr. Daw Wah Wah Maung (Lecturer, Yangon Institute of Economics).

Call for Civil Society’s Participation

In the 2nd ASEAN Peoples’ Forum / 5th ASEAN Civil Society Conference

18-20 October 2009

Cha-am, prescription Phetchaburi Province, pharm Thailand

The first ASEAN Peoples’ Forum (APF) held in February 2009 in Bangkok brought together representatives of various citizens’ groups in the region to exchange experiences, recipe raising issues of common concern, and deliberate on common recommendations to the ASEAN.  The Forum was effectively linked to the Fourth ASEAN Civil Society Conference (ACSC IV) in which the focus was on civil society’s continuous engagement with the ASEAN bodies as recommendations from the APF’s 30 workshops was debated and adopted for forwarding to the ASEAN leaders.  The highlights of the February event were the two-hour straightforward dialogue with the ASEAN Secretary-General and the Thai Minister of Foreign Affairs, and the half-hour informal meeting between representatives of the APF with the ASEAN leaders in Cha-am.

As the ASEAN leaders and officials are gathering in Thailand for the 16th ASEAN summit, the Joint Thai-Regional APF Working Group, comprising Thai and regional civil society organizations that constituted the Organizing Committee of the APF / ACSC IV, once again invite civil society groups in Southeast Asia to participate in the Second ASEAN Peoples’ Forum /the Fifth ASEAN Civil Society Conference to be held at Regent Beach Cha-am, Phetchaburi Province, Thailand.

To pursue the goal of advancing a peoples’ ASEAN, the Second APF / Fifth ACSC (APF II / ACSC V) will feature expanded dialogue with ASEAN governments’ and ASEAN Secretariat’s senior officials who are involved in the three ASEAN Community Councils. The key objectives of the dialogue are to explore the options and limitations and identifying potential solutions for the ASEAN to meet the demands and aspirations of its peoples, and to foster governments-peoples cooperation in creating building blocks for a just, people-centred, and genuine caring and sharing ASEAN Community, which we hope is a shared goal of all the ASEAN governments.

The key broad issues for which the APF II / ACSC V will focus on and for which it will seek ASEAN governments’ inputs, clarifications and discussions on potential solutions include:

Socio-Cultural Cluster: Mechanisms and TOR of the Socio-Cultural community, TOR for the ASEAN Commission for Women and Children, People’s Participation, Migration, Disability, Health, Culture and Natural disasters.

Socio-Economic Cluster: Impacts of economic integration; Impact and roles of economic actors and people and general; Cross-border economic concerns and ASEAN’s capability to deal with them; Sustainable production and consumption, energy and development; Regional response to the economic crisis.

Environmental Cluster: Large-scale development projects that lead to the environment and livelihood destruction; ASEAN position and action plan on climate change; Biodiversity, Sustainable Agriculture and Food Sovereignty.

Political Security Cluster: Challenges in the implementation of the political security community, conflict resolutions, human rights and democracy in ASEAN

It is anticipated that the ASEAN leaders will agree to another interface meeting with a group of representatives from the APF II / ACSC V at the beginning of their summit meeting on October 23, 2009, so that the peoples’ recommendations from the forum can be submitted directly, hopefully also to be discussed, in the interface meeting.

The APF II / ACSC V will be a 3-day open forum for around 500 representatives of Southeast Asian civil society groups, including 260 from the host country. The Regent Beach Cha-am Resort, being in the same neighbourhood as the venue of the ASEAN summit, has been selected as the venue in order to facilitate the attendance of the ASEAN government officials in our proposed dialogue. Participants can be accommodated at the same Resort at discounted price. The schedule of the whole event and the concept notes of the 4 clusters of dialogue are being finalized. All the program and logistic details will be available for perusal on the website www.aseanpeplesforum.org by September 22, 2009.

Due to the space limit, all interested groups are requested to register ahead of time starting from September 22 at the website www.aseanpeoplesfrum.net. Registration will close as soon as the available spaces are filled.

We do hope to see you all in Cha-am!

Joint Thai-Regional Working Group on ASEAN Peoples’ Forum:

NGO Coordinating Committee on Development (NGO-COD), Thailand

People’s Empowerment Foundation, Thailand

Sustainable Agriculture Foundation, Thailand

Thai Volunteer Service Foundation (TVS), Thailand

Altsean-Burma

Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development (Forum-Asia)

Committee for Asian Women (CAW)

Focus on the Global South (Focus)

Southeast Asia Committee for Advocacy (SEACA)

Towards Ecological Recovery and Regional Alliance (TERRA)

Union Network International, Asia-Pacific Regional Office (UNI-APRO)

 

Download the Media Kit

 

See:


Advancing a Peoples’ ASEAN: Continuing Dialogue: Statement of the 2nd ASEAN Peoples’ Forum (APF)/5th ASEAN Civil Society Conference (ACSC)



 


Call for Civil Society’s Participation

In the 2nd ASEAN Peoples’ Forum / 5th ASEAN Civil Society Conference

18-20 October 2009

Cha-am, malady Phetchaburi Province, sovaldi Thailand

The first ASEAN Peoples’ Forum (APF) held in February 2009 in Bangkok brought together representatives of various citizens’ groups in the region to exchange experiences, raising issues of common concern, and deliberate on common recommendations to the ASEAN.  The Forum was effectively linked to the Fourth ASEAN Civil Society Conference (ACSC IV) in which the focus was on civil society’s continuous engagement with the ASEAN bodies as recommendations from the APF’s 30 workshops was debated and adopted for forwarding to the ASEAN leaders.  The highlights of the February event were the two-hour straightforward dialogue with the ASEAN Secretary-General and the Thai Minister of Foreign Affairs, and the half-hour informal meeting between representatives of the APF with the ASEAN leaders in Cha-am.

As the ASEAN leaders and officials are gathering in Thailand for the 16th ASEAN summit, the Joint Thai-Regional APF Working Group, comprising Thai and regional civil society organizations that constituted the Organizing Committee of the APF / ACSC IV, once again invite civil society groups in Southeast Asia to participate in the Second ASEAN Peoples’ Forum /the Fifth ASEAN Civil Society Conference to be held at Regent Beach Cha-am, Phetchaburi Province, Thailand.

To pursue the goal of advancing a peoples’ ASEAN, the Second APF / Fifth ACSC (APF II / ACSC V) will feature expanded dialogue with ASEAN governments’ and ASEAN Secretariat’s senior officials who are involved in the three ASEAN Community Councils. The key objectives of the dialogue are to explore the options and limitations and identifying potential solutions for the ASEAN to meet the demands and aspirations of its peoples, and to foster governments-peoples cooperation in creating building blocks for a just, people-centred, and genuine caring and sharing ASEAN Community, which we hope is a shared goal of all the ASEAN governments.

The key broad issues for which the APF II / ACSC V will focus on and for which it will seek ASEAN governments’ inputs, clarifications and discussions on potential solutions include:

Socio-Cultural Cluster: Mechanisms and TOR of the Socio-Cultural community, TOR for the ASEAN Commission for Women and Children, People’s Participation, Migration, Disability, Health, Culture and Natural disasters.

Socio-Economic Cluster: Impacts of economic integration; Impact and roles of economic actors and people and general; Cross-border economic concerns and ASEAN’s capability to deal with them; Sustainable production and consumption, energy and development; Regional response to the economic crisis.

Environmental Cluster: Large-scale development projects that lead to the environment and livelihood destruction; ASEAN position and action plan on climate change; Biodiversity, Sustainable Agriculture and Food Sovereignty.

Political Security Cluster: Challenges in the implementation of the political security community, conflict resolutions, human rights and democracy in ASEAN

It is anticipated that the ASEAN leaders will agree to another interface meeting with a group of representatives from the APF II / ACSC V at the beginning of their summit meeting on October 23, 2009, so that the peoples’ recommendations from the forum can be submitted directly, hopefully also to be discussed, in the interface meeting.

The APF II / ACSC V will be a 3-day open forum for around 500 representatives of Southeast Asian civil society groups, including 260 from the host country. The Regent Beach Cha-am Resort, being in the same neighbourhood as the venue of the ASEAN summit, has been selected as the venue in order to facilitate the attendance of the ASEAN government officials in our proposed dialogue. Participants can be accommodated at the same Resort at discounted price. The schedule of the whole event and the concept notes of the 4 clusters of dialogue are being finalized. All the program and logistic details will be available for perusal on the website www.aseanpeplesforum.org by September 22, 2009.

Due to the space limit, all interested groups are requested to register ahead of time starting from September 22 at the website www.aseanpeoplesfrum.net. Registration will close as soon as the available spaces are filled.

We do hope to see you all in Cha-am!

Joint Thai-Regional Working Group on ASEAN Peoples’ Forum:

NGO Coordinating Committee on Development (NGO-COD), Thailand

People’s Empowerment Foundation, Thailand

Sustainable Agriculture Foundation, Thailand

Thai Volunteer Service Foundation (TVS), Thailand

Altsean-Burma

Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development (Forum-Asia)

Committee for Asian Women (CAW)

Focus on the Global South (Focus)

Southeast Asia Committee for Advocacy (SEACA)

Towards Ecological Recovery and Regional Alliance (TERRA)

Union Network International, Asia-Pacific Regional Office (UNI-APRO)

 

Download the Media Kit

 


At 11:30pm, Thurs, Thai foreign Ministry officials informed organizers of APF that 5 out of 10 civil society representatives were rejected from the interface meeting with ASEAN heads of government. The remaining representatives were told to be ready for pick up at 7.A.M., nearly 5 hours before the scheduled meeting. (see below for list of delegates).

These representatives arrived at the Dusit Hotel and were instructed that they would not be permitted to speak at the event. The only person from civil society allowed to make a statement would be Dr Surichai Wangaeo of Chulalongkorn University, who was originally appointed as moderator of the Interface.

The representatives were further shocked to learn that Singapore and Myanmar had selected substitutes from government-sponsored agencies. Singapore selected a substitute from a charity and the Myanmar regime selected Sitt Aye and Win Myaing, of the Anti-Narcotics Association (Win Myaing is a former high-ranking police officer).

These developments rendered the interface, an important space for civil society to engage with government officials, utterly meaningless. Therefore, the representatives of Thailand, Malaysia and Indonesia decided to walk out of the meeting.

We feel strongly that the rejection of our democratically-selected representatives is a rejection of both civil society and the democratic process. Our delegates were selected during the 3-day APF/ACSC, Oct 18-20. Through this action, the governments concerned are fundamentally undermining the spirit and content of the ASEAN Charter that they ratified a year ago.

The behaviour of the governments of Cambodia, Laos, Singapore, Philippines and Burma in rejecting their civil society representatives sabotages the credibility of the ASEAN Inter-governmental Commission on Human Rights (AICHR) which is being inaugurated today.

Civil society has been committed to the objectives of a people-centred ASEAN as enshrined in the Charter. We have remained determined in our commitment to the essential dialogue process despite the insults and obstacles generated by some officials. We were flexible when 2 out of 10 representatives were rejected in February. Civil society engaged with governments for the past few months in order to improve the relationship, however it is clear that the commitment to engagement has been one-sided, now that 5 out of 10 have been rejected, and the rest were essentially gagged.

We are deeply disappointed at the irresponsibility and apparent irrationality of the governments’ position. At this time of crisis, we were absolutely committed to an opportunity to present civil society’s solutions. The tactics of the governments concerned prove they are not open to discussing solutions to the urgent problems confronting ASEAN – both governments and peoples.

Finally we plead with these leaders to stop trying to kill the spirit of an ASEAN community. Such moves not only hurt the development of the region but also the credibility of individual member states and ASEAN as a whole.

—-
REJECTED
Ms. Khin Ohmar, Burma/Myanmar
Mr. Nay Vanda, Cambodia
Mrs. Manichanh Philaphanh, Lao PDR
Sister Crescencia L. Lucero, Phillipines
Mr. Sinapan Samydorai, Singapore.
INCLUDED BUT GAGGED
* Ms. Yuyun Wahyuningrum, Indonesia
* Mr. Moon Hui Tah, Malaysia
* Ms. Sawart Pramoonsilp, Thailand
Ms. Tran Thi Thu Thuy, Vietnam
Dato Paduka Zainal Momin, Brunei
* walked out
——
ENDS

Advancing a Peoples’ ASEAN: Continuing Dialogue: Statement of the 2nd ASEAN Peoples’ Forum (APF)/5th ASEAN Civil Society Conference (ACSC)

The events of People’s SAARC in Kathmandu were organized from 23 to 25 March 2007 with an objective of strengthening the people’s solidarity in South Asia in tune with the vision and perspectives of an alternative model for political, social, economic, and cultural order that must ensure democracy, justice and peace for all in the region. Moreover, it aimed to strengthen people-to-people relationships in the region that would inaugurate a climate to revive the balance and harmony among the people. It should liquidate artificial and inhuman barriers that divide lands, people and minds, transcending all the boundaries.


Proceedings of People's SAARC cover sheet

Download PDF

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } A:link { color: #0000ff } –>

Jenina Joy Chavez / Focus on the Global South

 

(Presentation at the Conference on “Regional Integration: an Opportunity Presented by the Crisis”, Asuncion, for sale Paraguay, site July 21-22, 2009.)

 

 

What I will tackle this evening is an updated version of the notes I used for the Regional Integration: Opportunities to Face the Crisis conference in Asuncion, Paraguay, and the Philippine WS on ASEAN, earlier this year. There is no claim that regional responses are the only viable responses to the global crisis, but hopefully we would be able to determine if it is appropriate to study and consider them as part of the many options on alternates we can try.

 

Before the crisis, it has been projected that in about a decade, the South –that is, the developing countries – would account for more than half of the world income and more than 50% of global trade. It has been trumpeted all over that Asia together with other emerging economies would be the major growth drivers in the world economy, highlighting the relevance of South-South cooperation, particularly regional economic integration in Asia.

 

For Asia, at least, this claim has been put to the test with the onset of the global financial crisis that put into the spotlight the basic development paradigm deployed by what is considered the world over as prosperous Asia.

 

 

In terms of what has happened in the last year and a half, following are some observations on how Asia tried to respond to the crisis:

 

  • First, unlike what characterized how the North (particularly Western Europe and North America) responded to the crisis, Asia’s response does not include massive bailout packages to failing corporations, particularly ailing financial entities.

 

    • This highlights the differential manifestations of the crisis. While financialization is a global phenomenon, sparing no one and certainly not Asia, Asia still hosts one of the most robust productive capacity worldwide – that is, the real economy remains the most significant feature of Asia’s growth and development.

 

  • Second, in most countries, though, the immediate response was to address the liquidity crunch and the crisis of confidence, especially in the banking system. This included moves to increase deposit insurance coverage, and guarantees on deposit-taking institutions. As a result, massive bank runs have been avoided.

 

  • Third, from the initial liquidity crunch, economic slowdown became the norm. Hence, governments moved to address this by increasing liquidity and easing credit and monetary policy, including intervening in foreign exchange markets. Many state enterprises also increased their shareholdings in publicly-traded companies. The result – relative low interest rates.

 

  • Fourth, stimulus packages have at their center fiscal policy and public spending, although social sector spending has not received much attention.

 

    • Asian countries have devoted between less than ½ percent of GDP to their fiscal stimulus package to more than 9%.

    • Among the biggest packages are those of the following:

      • Singapore, $15B (6%)

      • Malaysia, $2B initially to $16B (9% of GDP)

      • China, $600B spread only over 2 years

    • Most of the stimulus packages have a central tax break or tax credit component, as well as capital spending, including re-capitalization of state-run banks, most notably in India.

 

  • Fifth, the Asian response has been centered around resiliency. That is, they are focused on minimizing unemployment and on creating employment opportunities

 

    • With programs like job credits or payouts to employers of up to 12% of salaries (Singapore)

    • Various skills upgrading and retraining programs

    • Welfare support to retrenched workers and returning overseas workers.

    • Such resiliency packages, though, highlighted some tensions inherent in the increasingly connected Asian economies and job markets.

      • For instance, part of Malaysia’s and Singapore’s response is to cut down or crackdown on migrant workers, a classic response to appease worker’s restiveness at home, and a blatant disregard to the ripple such moves might effect.

 

  • Sixth, at least the ASEAN+3 is trying to improve on a regional financial cooperation first introduced in 2000 as a response to the 97/98 Asian financial crisis.

    • The Chiang Mai Initiative is a collaboration to create a network of bilateral swap arrangements to manage short-term liquidity problems.

    • From $20B in 2000, it increased to $80B in 2008, and earlier this year was increased further to $120B.

    • Moreover, the swaps are being multilateralized, a step towards developing from a bilateral into a regional pool.

    • This is about the only such regional initiative in Asia. There is no equivalent for South Asia, or in West and Central Asia.

 

 

From these observations, several key questions emerge:

 

  • 1st: would Asia be able to export its way out of the crisis? Is it even proper to aim only for this?

 

  • 2nd:: would the regional integration vaunted to be necessary to solidify and further the growth in Asia be resorted to, or given life in practice, in the wake of this crisis?

 

  • 3rd: in the design of crisis response, what is Asia aiming for?

    • Is it just to recover previous levels of consumption and economic activity?

    • How much of the response is for immediate relief, extremely necessary at this time?

    • And how much of this response is for the long-term and tries to take advantage of converting the crisis into opportunity?

 

 

At this point, I would like to emphasize three points that interrogate what Asia has managed or not managed to do:

 

  • One, note that the responses now differ qualitatively from the responses Asia had a decade ago.

 

    • There is no IMF, not least because the IMF has gained notoriety and lost a lot of credibility because of how it bungled its job in the late 1990s.

    • Not only is there no IMF, the policy and programmatic responses of Asia have been antithesis to what the IMF formerly prescribed.

      • There was no interest cure that killed business; instead efforts were concentrated on preserving relative low interest rates (including intervention in the forex market).

      • There were many elements of direct transfers, subsidies, and re-capitalization; something the IMF would never do (at least before).

    • In short, the responses are not patently neoliberal.

 

  • Two, these responses have not warranted enough incentive towards a focus on internal demand, on the one hand, and on coordinated expanded demand regionally, on the other.

 

    • More pointedly, it is a concern that Asia should even set as its main objective the recovery and maintenance of consumption levels prior to the crisis.

    • We should not be overly concerned about trying to save what has been clearly a cause of failure. It is high time for Asia to draw from regional resources and invent something that will again set it apart – or, place it in cooperation with other regions trying to imagine things differently.

 

  • Three, there is concern that ASEAN+3 finds it difficult to make good on regional financial cooperation as designed through the Chiang Mai Initiative and related processes.

 

    • Take for instance, when South Korea got hit when the Lehman Brothers collapsed, it negotiated a $30B foreign exchange swap with the US Federal Reserve and not the ASEAN+3. (They came later.)

    • Despite increases in commitments, the CMI is still not functional, and the IMF still plays a role when countries tap the CMI for more than 20% of their requirement, detracting from the importance of financial as well policy autonomy for Asia.

 

 

There are certainly elements of response – some quite innovative or at least properly targeted – in Asia. The question is whether Asia is able to turn the crisis on its head, and be able to emerge with another unique contribution to development discourse as it has been known to have done in the past.

 

Moreover, we as civil society and social movements, in our interrogation of possible alternatives, esp. if we have little or no hold on power – the question of how to get that power either by holding political power ourselves or rallying massive constituencies on our side – is key.

 

The final set of points I wish to make has to do with the areas where regional response would be crucial:

 

  • One, the need to focus on internal demand and a more coordinated rationalization of regional demand.

 

    • There is need to re-imagine trade and production cooperation, where instead of competition, the prevailing principles would be cooperation, complementation and solidarity.

    • Such arrangement must address the issue of excess, and should have as outer limit some climate and ecological threshold.

 

  • Two, there is need to overhaul the financial architecture for Asia

 

    • Away from dependence on Northern currencies, esp. the American $

    • And towards the pooling of alternative sources of development finance

    • As well as appropriate surveillance and monitoring systems (without the IMF) that assist countries and build confidence that every one takes responsibility for regional financial stability

 

  • Three, there is need to strengthen regional stockpiling for food security

 

    • South Asia has better experience on this although technically Southeast Asia pledges bigger reserves

    • Away from trade logic and towards regional self-help and development of crisis response capabilities.

 

  • Four, there is need to re-imagine the public

 

    • It is time to talk about the public not only in the narrow confines of the State or the government, but also support different forms of provisioning that allowed communities to survive at a time that the State was neglecting them.

    • It must be recognized that such strength can be scaled up at the national and the regional level.

 

  • Five, whatever alternative we think of, resonance with the people is important.

 

    • We need to start where there is clear demand, and patent need, to make regional arrangements acceptable to the people

      • Migration

      • Rights and democracy

      • Decent living standards and environment

      • Ability to generate economic activity and distribute its fruits equitably

    • There is need to also work on something that works and shows results in the immediate even as the strategic alternative structures are still being constructed.

Jenina Joy Chavez / Focus on the Global South

 

(Presentation at the Conference on “Regional Integration: an Opportunity Presented by the Crisis”, diagnosis Asuncion, Paraguay, July 21-22, 2009.)

 

What I will tackle this evening is an updated version of the notes I used for the Regional Integration: Opportunities to Face the Crisis conference in Asuncion, Paraguay, and the Philippine WS on ASEAN, earlier this year. There is no claim that regional responses are the only viable responses to the global crisis, but hopefully we would be able to determine if it is appropriate to study and consider them as part of the many options on alternates we can try.

Before the crisis, it has been projected that in about a decade, the South –that is, the developing countries – would account for more than half of the world income and more than 50% of global trade. It has been trumpeted all over that Asia together with other emerging economies would be the major growth drivers in the world economy, highlighting the relevance of South-South cooperation, particularly regional economic integration in Asia.

For Asia, at least, this claim has been put to the test with the onset of the global financial crisis that put into the spotlight the basic development paradigm deployed by what is considered the world over as prosperous Asia.

In terms of what has happened in the last year and a half, following are some observations on how Asia tried to respond to the crisis:

First, unlike what characterized how the North (particularly Western Europe and North America) responded to the crisis, Asia’s response does not include massive bailout packages to failing corporations, particularly ailing financial entities.

This highlights the differential manifestations of the crisis. While financialization is a global phenomenon, sparing no one and certainly not Asia, Asia still hosts one of the most robust productive capacity worldwide – that is, the real economy remains the most significant feature of Asia’s growth and development.

Second, in most countries, though, the immediate response was to address the liquidity crunch and the crisis of confidence, especially in the banking system. This included moves to increase deposit insurance coverage, and guarantees on deposit-taking institutions. As a result, massive bank runs have been avoided.

Third, from the initial liquidity crunch, economic slowdown became the norm. Hence, governments moved to address this by increasing liquidity and easing credit and monetary policy, including intervening in foreign exchange markets. Many state enterprises also increased their shareholdings in publicly-traded companies. The result – relative low interest rates.

Fourth, stimulus packages have at their center fiscal policy and public spending, although social sector spending has not received much attention.

Asian countries have devoted between less than ½ percent of GDP to their fiscal stimulus package to more than 9%.

Among the biggest packages are those of the following:

      • Singapore, $15B (6%)
      • Malaysia, $2B initially to $16B (9% of GDP)
      • China, $600B spread only over 2 years

Most of the stimulus packages have a central tax break or tax credit component, as well as capital spending, including re-capitalization of state-run banks, most notably in India.

Fifth, the Asian response has been centered around resiliency. That is, they are focused on minimizing unemployment and on creating employment opportunities

With programs like job credits or payouts to employers of up to 12% of salaries (Singapore)

Various skills upgrading and retraining programs

Welfare support to retrenched workers and returning overseas workers.

Such resiliency packages, though, highlighted some tensions inherent in the increasingly connected Asian economies and job markets.

      • For instance, part of Malaysia’s and Singapore’s response is to cut down or crackdown on migrant workers, a classic response to appease worker’s restiveness at home, and a blatant disregard to the ripple such moves might effect.

Sixth, at least the ASEAN+3 is trying to improve on a regional financial cooperation first introduced in 2000 as a response to the 97/98 Asian financial crisis.

The Chiang Mai Initiative is a collaboration to create a network of bilateral swap arrangements to manage short-term liquidity problems.

From $20B in 2000, it increased to $80B in 2008, and earlier this year was increased further to $120B.

Moreover, the swaps are being multilateralized, a step towards developing from a bilateral into a regional pool.

This is about the only such regional initiative in Asia. There is no equivalent for South Asia, or in West and Central Asia.

From these observations, several key questions emerge:

1st: would Asia be able to export its way out of the crisis? Is it even proper to aim only for this?

2nd:: would the regional integration vaunted to be necessary to solidify and further the growth in Asia be resorted to, or given life in practice, in the wake of this crisis?

3rd: in the design of crisis response, what is Asia aiming for?

Is it just to recover previous levels of consumption and economic activity?

How much of the response is for immediate relief, extremely necessary at this time?

And how much of this response is for the long-term and tries to take advantage of converting the crisis into opportunity?

At this point, I would like to emphasize three points that interrogate what Asia has managed or not managed to do:

One, note that the responses now differ qualitatively from the responses Asia had a decade ago.

There is no IMF, not least because the IMF has gained notoriety and lost a lot of credibility because of how it bungled its job in the late 1990s.

Not only is there no IMF, the policy and programmatic responses of Asia have been antithesis to what the IMF formerly prescribed.

      • There was no interest cure that killed business; instead efforts were concentrated on preserving relative low interest rates (including intervention in the forex market).
      • There were many elements of direct transfers, subsidies, and re-capitalization; something the IMF would never do (at least before).

In short, the responses are not patently neoliberal.

Two, these responses have not warranted enough incentive towards a focus on internal demand, on the one hand, and on coordinated expanded demand regionally, on the other.

More pointedly, it is a concern that Asia should even set as its main objective the recovery and maintenance of consumption levels prior to the crisis.

We should not be overly concerned about trying to save what has been clearly a cause of failure. It is high time for Asia to draw from regional resources and invent something that will again set it apart – or, place it in cooperation with other regions trying to imagine things differently.

Three, there is concern that ASEAN+3 finds it difficult to make good on regional financial cooperation as designed through the Chiang Mai Initiative and related processes.

Take for instance, when South Korea got hit when the Lehman Brothers collapsed, it negotiated a $30B foreign exchange swap with the US Federal Reserve and not the ASEAN+3. (They came later.)

Despite increases in commitments, the CMI is still not functional, and the IMF still plays a role when countries tap the CMI for more than 20% of their requirement, detracting from the importance of financial as well policy autonomy for Asia.

There are certainly elements of response – some quite innovative or at least properly targeted – in Asia. The question is whether Asia is able to turn the crisis on its head, and be able to emerge with another unique contribution to development discourse as it has been known to have done in the past.

Moreover, we as civil society and social movements, in our interrogation of possible alternatives, esp. if we have little or no hold on power – the question of how to get that power either by holding political power ourselves or rallying massive constituencies on our side – is key.

The final set of points I wish to make has to do with the areas where regional response would be crucial:

One, the need to focus on internal demand and a more coordinated rationalization of regional demand.

There is need to re-imagine trade and production cooperation, where instead of competition, the prevailing principles would be cooperation, complementation and solidarity.

Such arrangement must address the issue of excess, and should have as outer limit some climate and ecological threshold.

Two, there is need to overhaul the financial architecture for Asia

Away from dependence on Northern currencies, esp. the American $

And towards the pooling of alternative sources of development finance

As well as appropriate surveillance and monitoring systems (without the IMF) that assist countries and build confidence that every one takes responsibility for regional financial stability

Three, there is need to strengthen regional stockpiling for food security

South Asia has better experience on this although technically Southeast Asia pledges bigger reserves

Away from trade logic and towards regional self-help and development of crisis response capabilities.

Four, there is need to re-imagine the public

It is time to talk about the public not only in the narrow confines of the State or the government, but also support different forms of provisioning that allowed communities to survive at a time that the State was neglecting them.

It must be recognized that such strength can be scaled up at the national and the regional level.

Five, whatever alternative we think of, resonance with the people is important.

We need to start where there is clear demand, and patent need, to make regional arrangements acceptable to the people

      • Migration
      • Rights and democracy
      • Decent living standards and environment
      • Ability to generate economic activity and distribute its fruits equitably

There is need to also work on something that works and shows results in the immediate even as the strategic alternative structures are still being constructed.


<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } A:link { color: #0000ff } –>

Jenina Joy Chavez / Focus on the Global South

 

(Presentation at the Conference on “Regional Integration: an Opportunity Presented by the Crisis”, online Asuncion, Paraguay, July 21-22, 2009.)

 

 

What I will tackle this evening is an updated version of the notes I used for the Regional Integration: Opportunities to Face the Crisis conference in Asuncion, Paraguay, and the Philippine WS on ASEAN, earlier this year. There is no claim that regional responses are the only viable responses to the global crisis, but hopefully we would be able to determine if it is appropriate to study and consider them as part of the many options on alternates we can try.

 

Before the crisis, it has been projected that in about a decade, the South –that is, the developing countries – would account for more than half of the world income and more than 50% of global trade. It has been trumpeted all over that Asia together with other emerging economies would be the major growth drivers in the world economy, highlighting the relevance of South-South cooperation, particularly regional economic integration in Asia.

 

For Asia, at least, this claim has been put to the test with the onset of the global financial crisis that put into the spotlight the basic development paradigm deployed by what is considered the world over as prosperous Asia.

 

 

In terms of what has happened in the last year and a half, following are some observations on how Asia tried to respond to the crisis:

 

  • First, unlike what characterized how the North (particularly Western Europe and North America) responded to the crisis, Asia’s response does not include massive bailout packages to failing corporations, particularly ailing financial entities.

 

    • This highlights the differential manifestations of the crisis. While financialization is a global phenomenon, sparing no one and certainly not Asia, Asia still hosts one of the most robust productive capacity worldwide – that is, the real economy remains the most significant feature of Asia’s growth and development.

 

  • Second, in most countries, though, the immediate response was to address the liquidity crunch and the crisis of confidence, especially in the banking system. This included moves to increase deposit insurance coverage, and guarantees on deposit-taking institutions. As a result, massive bank runs have been avoided.

 

  • Third, from the initial liquidity crunch, economic slowdown became the norm. Hence, governments moved to address this by increasing liquidity and easing credit and monetary policy, including intervening in foreign exchange markets. Many state enterprises also increased their shareholdings in publicly-traded companies. The result – relative low interest rates.

 

  • Fourth, stimulus packages have at their center fiscal policy and public spending, although social sector spending has not received much attention.

 

    • Asian countries have devoted between less than ½ percent of GDP to their fiscal stimulus package to more than 9%.

    • Among the biggest packages are those of the following:

      • Singapore, $15B (6%)

      • Malaysia, $2B initially to $16B (9% of GDP)

      • China, $600B spread only over 2 years

    • Most of the stimulus packages have a central tax break or tax credit component, as well as capital spending, including re-capitalization of state-run banks, most notably in India.

 

  • Fifth, the Asian response has been centered around resiliency. That is, they are focused on minimizing unemployment and on creating employment opportunities

 

    • With programs like job credits or payouts to employers of up to 12% of salaries (Singapore)

    • Various skills upgrading and retraining programs

    • Welfare support to retrenched workers and returning overseas workers.

    • Such resiliency packages, though, highlighted some tensions inherent in the increasingly connected Asian economies and job markets.

      • For instance, part of Malaysia’s and Singapore’s response is to cut down or crackdown on migrant workers, a classic response to appease worker’s restiveness at home, and a blatant disregard to the ripple such moves might effect.

 

  • Sixth, at least the ASEAN+3 is trying to improve on a regional financial cooperation first introduced in 2000 as a response to the 97/98 Asian financial crisis.

    • The Chiang Mai Initiative is a collaboration to create a network of bilateral swap arrangements to manage short-term liquidity problems.

    • From $20B in 2000, it increased to $80B in 2008, and earlier this year was increased further to $120B.

    • Moreover, the swaps are being multilateralized, a step towards developing from a bilateral into a regional pool.

    • This is about the only such regional initiative in Asia. There is no equivalent for South Asia, or in West and Central Asia.

 

 

From these observations, several key questions emerge:

 

  • 1st: would Asia be able to export its way out of the crisis? Is it even proper to aim only for this?

 

  • 2nd:: would the regional integration vaunted to be necessary to solidify and further the growth in Asia be resorted to, or given life in practice, in the wake of this crisis?

 

  • 3rd: in the design of crisis response, what is Asia aiming for?

    • Is it just to recover previous levels of consumption and economic activity?

    • How much of the response is for immediate relief, extremely necessary at this time?

    • And how much of this response is for the long-term and tries to take advantage of converting the crisis into opportunity?

 

 

At this point, I would like to emphasize three points that interrogate what Asia has managed or not managed to do:

 

  • One, note that the responses now differ qualitatively from the responses Asia had a decade ago.

 

    • There is no IMF, not least because the IMF has gained notoriety and lost a lot of credibility because of how it bungled its job in the late 1990s.

    • Not only is there no IMF, the policy and programmatic responses of Asia have been antithesis to what the IMF formerly prescribed.

      • There was no interest cure that killed business; instead efforts were concentrated on preserving relative low interest rates (including intervention in the forex market).

      • There were many elements of direct transfers, subsidies, and re-capitalization; something the IMF would never do (at least before).

    • In short, the responses are not patently neoliberal.

 

  • Two, these responses have not warranted enough incentive towards a focus on internal demand, on the one hand, and on coordinated expanded demand regionally, on the other.

 

    • More pointedly, it is a concern that Asia should even set as its main objective the recovery and maintenance of consumption levels prior to the crisis.

    • We should not be overly concerned about trying to save what has been clearly a cause of failure. It is high time for Asia to draw from regional resources and invent something that will again set it apart – or, place it in cooperation with other regions trying to imagine things differently.

 

  • Three, there is concern that ASEAN+3 finds it difficult to make good on regional financial cooperation as designed through the Chiang Mai Initiative and related processes.

 

    • Take for instance, when South Korea got hit when the Lehman Brothers collapsed, it negotiated a $30B foreign exchange swap with the US Federal Reserve and not the ASEAN+3. (They came later.)

    • Despite increases in commitments, the CMI is still not functional, and the IMF still plays a role when countries tap the CMI for more than 20% of their requirement, detracting from the importance of financial as well policy autonomy for Asia.

 

 

There are certainly elements of response – some quite innovative or at least properly targeted – in Asia. The question is whether Asia is able to turn the crisis on its head, and be able to emerge with another unique contribution to development discourse as it has been known to have done in the past.

 

Moreover, we as civil society and social movements, in our interrogation of possible alternatives, esp. if we have little or no hold on power – the question of how to get that power either by holding political power ourselves or rallying massive constituencies on our side – is key.

 

The final set of points I wish to make has to do with the areas where regional response would be crucial:

 

  • One, the need to focus on internal demand and a more coordinated rationalization of regional demand.

 

    • There is need to re-imagine trade and production cooperation, where instead of competition, the prevailing principles would be cooperation, complementation and solidarity.

    • Such arrangement must address the issue of excess, and should have as outer limit some climate and ecological threshold.

 

  • Two, there is need to overhaul the financial architecture for Asia

 

    • Away from dependence on Northern currencies, esp. the American $

    • And towards the pooling of alternative sources of development finance

    • As well as appropriate surveillance and monitoring systems (without the IMF) that assist countries and build confidence that every one takes responsibility for regional financial stability

 

  • Three, there is need to strengthen regional stockpiling for food security

 

    • South Asia has better experience on this although technically Southeast Asia pledges bigger reserves

    • Away from trade logic and towards regional self-help and development of crisis response capabilities.

 

  • Four, there is need to re-imagine the public

 

    • It is time to talk about the public not only in the narrow confines of the State or the government, but also support different forms of provisioning that allowed communities to survive at a time that the State was neglecting them.

    • It must be recognized that such strength can be scaled up at the national and the regional level.

 

  • Five, whatever alternative we think of, resonance with the people is important.

 

    • We need to start where there is clear demand, and patent need, to make regional arrangements acceptable to the people

      • Migration

      • Rights and democracy

      • Decent living standards and environment

      • Ability to generate economic activity and distribute its fruits equitably

    • There is need to also work on something that works and shows results in the immediate even as the strategic alternative structures are still being constructed.

Jenina Joy Chavez / Focus on the Global South

 

(Presentation at the Conference on “Regional Integration: an Opportunity Presented by the Crisis”, sale Asuncion, sovaldi sale Paraguay, case July 21-22, 2009.)

 

What I will tackle this evening is an updated version of the notes I used for the Regional Integration: Opportunities to Face the Crisis conference in Asuncion, Paraguay, and the Philippine WS on ASEAN, earlier this year. There is no claim that regional responses are the only viable responses to the global crisis, but hopefully we would be able to determine if it is appropriate to study and consider them as part of the many options on alternates we can try.

 

Before the crisis, it has been projected that in about a decade, the South –that is, the developing countries – would account for more than half of the world income and more than 50% of global trade. It has been trumpeted all over that Asia together with other emerging economies would be the major growth drivers in the world economy, highlighting the relevance of South-South cooperation, particularly regional economic integration in Asia.

 

For Asia, at least, this claim has been put to the test with the onset of the global financial crisis that put into the spotlight the basic development paradigm deployed by what is considered the world over as prosperous Asia.

 

 

In terms of what has happened in the last year and a half, following are some observations on how Asia tried to respond to the crisis:

 

  • First, unlike what characterized how the North (particularly Western Europe and North America) responded to the crisis, Asia’s response does not include massive bailout packages to failing corporations, particularly ailing financial entities.

 

    • This highlights the differential manifestations of the crisis. While financialization is a global phenomenon, sparing no one and certainly not Asia, Asia still hosts one of the most robust productive capacity worldwide – that is, the real economy remains the most significant feature of Asia’s growth and development.

 

  • Second, in most countries, though, the immediate response was to address the liquidity crunch and the crisis of confidence, especially in the banking system. This included moves to increase deposit insurance coverage, and guarantees on deposit-taking institutions. As a result, massive bank runs have been avoided.

 

  • Third, from the initial liquidity crunch, economic slowdown became the norm. Hence, governments moved to address this by increasing liquidity and easing credit and monetary policy, including intervening in foreign exchange markets. Many state enterprises also increased their shareholdings in publicly-traded companies. The result – relative low interest rates.

 

  • Fourth, stimulus packages have at their center fiscal policy and public spending, although social sector spending has not received much attention.

 

    • Asian countries have devoted between less than ½ percent of GDP to their fiscal stimulus package to more than 9%.

    • Among the biggest packages are those of the following:

      • Singapore, $15B (6%)

      • Malaysia, $2B initially to $16B (9% of GDP)

      • China, $600B spread only over 2 years

    • Most of the stimulus packages have a central tax break or tax credit component, as well as capital spending, including re-capitalization of state-run banks, most notably in India.

 

  • Fifth, the Asian response has been centered around resiliency. That is, they are focused on minimizing unemployment and on creating employment opportunities

 

    • With programs like job credits or payouts to employers of up to 12% of salaries (Singapore)

    • Various skills upgrading and retraining programs

    • Welfare support to retrenched workers and returning overseas workers.

    • Such resiliency packages, though, highlighted some tensions inherent in the increasingly connected Asian economies and job markets.

      • For instance, part of Malaysia’s and Singapore’s response is to cut down or crackdown on migrant workers, a classic response to appease worker’s restiveness at home, and a blatant disregard to the ripple such moves might effect.

 

  • Sixth, at least the ASEAN+3 is trying to improve on a regional financial cooperation first introduced in 2000 as a response to the 97/98 Asian financial crisis.

    • The Chiang Mai Initiative is a collaboration to create a network of bilateral swap arrangements to manage short-term liquidity problems.

    • From $20B in 2000, it increased to $80B in 2008, and earlier this year was increased further to $120B.

    • Moreover, the swaps are being multilateralized, a step towards developing from a bilateral into a regional pool.

    • This is about the only such regional initiative in Asia. There is no equivalent for South Asia, or in West and Central Asia.

 

 

From these observations, several key questions emerge:

 

  • 1st: would Asia be able to export its way out of the crisis? Is it even proper to aim only for this?

 

  • 2nd:: would the regional integration vaunted to be necessary to solidify and further the growth in Asia be resorted to, or given life in practice, in the wake of this crisis?

 

  • 3rd: in the design of crisis response, what is Asia aiming for?

    • Is it just to recover previous levels of consumption and economic activity?

    • How much of the response is for immediate relief, extremely necessary at this time?

    • And how much of this response is for the long-term and tries to take advantage of converting the crisis into opportunity?

 

 

At this point, I would like to emphasize three points that interrogate what Asia has managed or not managed to do:

 

  • One, note that the responses now differ qualitatively from the responses Asia had a decade ago.

 

    • There is no IMF, not least because the IMF has gained notoriety and lost a lot of credibility because of how it bungled its job in the late 1990s.

    • Not only is there no IMF, the policy and programmatic responses of Asia have been antithesis to what the IMF formerly prescribed.

      • There was no interest cure that killed business; instead efforts were concentrated on preserving relative low interest rates (including intervention in the forex market).

      • There were many elements of direct transfers, subsidies, and re-capitalization; something the IMF would never do (at least before).

    • In short, the responses are not patently neoliberal.

 

  • Two, these responses have not warranted enough incentive towards a focus on internal demand, on the one hand, and on coordinated expanded demand regionally, on the other.

 

    • More pointedly, it is a concern that Asia should even set as its main objective the recovery and maintenance of consumption levels prior to the crisis.

    • We should not be overly concerned about trying to save what has been clearly a cause of failure. It is high time for Asia to draw from regional resources and invent something that will again set it apart – or, place it in cooperation with other regions trying to imagine things differently.

 

  • Three, there is concern that ASEAN+3 finds it difficult to make good on regional financial cooperation as designed through the Chiang Mai Initiative and related processes.

 

    • Take for instance, when South Korea got hit when the Lehman Brothers collapsed, it negotiated a $30B foreign exchange swap with the US Federal Reserve and not the ASEAN+3. (They came later.)

    • Despite increases in commitments, the CMI is still not functional, and the IMF still plays a role when countries tap the CMI for more than 20% of their requirement, detracting from the importance of financial as well policy autonomy for Asia.

 

 

There are certainly elements of response – some quite innovative or at least properly targeted – in Asia. The question is whether Asia is able to turn the crisis on its head, and be able to emerge with another unique contribution to development discourse as it has been known to have done in the past.

 

Moreover, we as civil society and social movements, in our interrogation of possible alternatives, esp. if we have little or no hold on power – the question of how to get that power either by holding political power ourselves or rallying massive constituencies on our side – is key.

 

The final set of points I wish to make has to do with the areas where regional response would be crucial:

 

  • One, the need to focus on internal demand and a more coordinated rationalization of regional demand.

 

    • There is need to re-imagine trade and production cooperation, where instead of competition, the prevailing principles would be cooperation, complementation and solidarity.

    • Such arrangement must address the issue of excess, and should have as outer limit some climate and ecological threshold.

 

  • Two, there is need to overhaul the financial architecture for Asia

 

    • Away from dependence on Northern currencies, esp. the American $

    • And towards the pooling of alternative sources of development finance

    • As well as appropriate surveillance and monitoring systems (without the IMF) that assist countries and build confidence that every one takes responsibility for regional financial stability

 

  • Three, there is need to strengthen regional stockpiling for food security

 

    • South Asia has better experience on this although technically Southeast Asia pledges bigger reserves

    • Away from trade logic and towards regional self-help and development of crisis response capabilities.

 

  • Four, there is need to re-imagine the public

 

    • It is time to talk about the public not only in the narrow confines of the State or the government, but also support different forms of provisioning that allowed communities to survive at a time that the State was neglecting them.

    • It must be recognized that such strength can be scaled up at the national and the regional level.

 

  • Five, whatever alternative we think of, resonance with the people is important.

 

    • We need to start where there is clear demand, and patent need, to make regional arrangements acceptable to the people

      • Migration

      • Rights and democracy

      • Decent living standards and environment

      • Ability to generate economic activity and distribute its fruits equitably

    • There is need to also work on something that works and shows results in the immediate even as the strategic alternative structures are still being constructed.

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } A:link { color: #0000ff } –>

Jenina Joy Chavez / Focus on the Global South

 

(Presentation at the Conference on “Regional Integration: an Opportunity Presented by the Crisis”, sale Asuncion, pills Paraguay, July 21-22, 2009.)

 

What I will tackle this evening is an updated version of the notes I used for the Regional Integration: Opportunities to Face the Crisis conference in Asuncion, Paraguay, and the Philippine WS on ASEAN, earlier this year. There is no claim that regional responses are the only viable responses to the global crisis, but hopefully we would be able to determine if it is appropriate to study and consider them as part of the many options on alternates we can try.

 

Before the crisis, it has been projected that in about a decade, the South –that is, the developing countries – would account for more than half of the world income and more than 50% of global trade. It has been trumpeted all over that Asia together with other emerging economies would be the major growth drivers in the world economy, highlighting the relevance of South-South cooperation, particularly regional economic integration in Asia.

 

For Asia, at least, this claim has been put to the test with the onset of the global financial crisis that put into the spotlight the basic development paradigm deployed by what is considered the world over as prosperous Asia.

 

 

In terms of what has happened in the last year and a half, following are some observations on how Asia tried to respond to the crisis:

 

  • First, unlike what characterized how the North (particularly Western Europe and North America) responded to the crisis, Asia’s response does not include massive bailout packages to failing corporations, particularly ailing financial entities.

 

    • This highlights the differential manifestations of the crisis. While financialization is a global phenomenon, sparing no one and certainly not Asia, Asia still hosts one of the most robust productive capacity worldwide – that is, the real economy remains the most significant feature of Asia’s growth and development.

 

  • Second, in most countries, though, the immediate response was to address the liquidity crunch and the crisis of confidence, especially in the banking system. This included moves to increase deposit insurance coverage, and guarantees on deposit-taking institutions. As a result, massive bank runs have been avoided.

 

  • Third, from the initial liquidity crunch, economic slowdown became the norm. Hence, governments moved to address this by increasing liquidity and easing credit and monetary policy, including intervening in foreign exchange markets. Many state enterprises also increased their shareholdings in publicly-traded companies. The result – relative low interest rates.

 

  • Fourth, stimulus packages have at their center fiscal policy and public spending, although social sector spending has not received much attention.

 

    • Asian countries have devoted between less than ½ percent of GDP to their fiscal stimulus package to more than 9%.

    • Among the biggest packages are those of the following:

      • Singapore, $15B (6%)

      • Malaysia, $2B initially to $16B (9% of GDP)

      • China, $600B spread only over 2 years

    • Most of the stimulus packages have a central tax break or tax credit component, as well as capital spending, including re-capitalization of state-run banks, most notably in India.

 

  • Fifth, the Asian response has been centered around resiliency. That is, they are focused on minimizing unemployment and on creating employment opportunities

 

    • With programs like job credits or payouts to employers of up to 12% of salaries (Singapore)

    • Various skills upgrading and retraining programs

    • Welfare support to retrenched workers and returning overseas workers.

    • Such resiliency packages, though, highlighted some tensions inherent in the increasingly connected Asian economies and job markets.

      • For instance, part of Malaysia’s and Singapore’s response is to cut down or crackdown on migrant workers, a classic response to appease worker’s restiveness at home, and a blatant disregard to the ripple such moves might effect.

 

  • Sixth, at least the ASEAN+3 is trying to improve on a regional financial cooperation first introduced in 2000 as a response to the 97/98 Asian financial crisis.

    • The Chiang Mai Initiative is a collaboration to create a network of bilateral swap arrangements to manage short-term liquidity problems.

    • From $20B in 2000, it increased to $80B in 2008, and earlier this year was increased further to $120B.

    • Moreover, the swaps are being multilateralized, a step towards developing from a bilateral into a regional pool.

    • This is about the only such regional initiative in Asia. There is no equivalent for South Asia, or in West and Central Asia.

 

 

From these observations, several key questions emerge:

 

  • 1st: would Asia be able to export its way out of the crisis? Is it even proper to aim only for this?

 

  • 2nd:: would the regional integration vaunted to be necessary to solidify and further the growth in Asia be resorted to, or given life in practice, in the wake of this crisis?

 

  • 3rd: in the design of crisis response, what is Asia aiming for?

    • Is it just to recover previous levels of consumption and economic activity?

    • How much of the response is for immediate relief, extremely necessary at this time?

    • And how much of this response is for the long-term and tries to take advantage of converting the crisis into opportunity?

 

 

At this point, I would like to emphasize three points that interrogate what Asia has managed or not managed to do:

 

  • One, note that the responses now differ qualitatively from the responses Asia had a decade ago.

 

    • There is no IMF, not least because the IMF has gained notoriety and lost a lot of credibility because of how it bungled its job in the late 1990s.

    • Not only is there no IMF, the policy and programmatic responses of Asia have been antithesis to what the IMF formerly prescribed.

      • There was no interest cure that killed business; instead efforts were concentrated on preserving relative low interest rates (including intervention in the forex market).

      • There were many elements of direct transfers, subsidies, and re-capitalization; something the IMF would never do (at least before).

    • In short, the responses are not patently neoliberal.

 

  • Two, these responses have not warranted enough incentive towards a focus on internal demand, on the one hand, and on coordinated expanded demand regionally, on the other.

 

    • More pointedly, it is a concern that Asia should even set as its main objective the recovery and maintenance of consumption levels prior to the crisis.

    • We should not be overly concerned about trying to save what has been clearly a cause of failure. It is high time for Asia to draw from regional resources and invent something that will again set it apart – or, place it in cooperation with other regions trying to imagine things differently.

 

  • Three, there is concern that ASEAN+3 finds it difficult to make good on regional financial cooperation as designed through the Chiang Mai Initiative and related processes.

 

    • Take for instance, when South Korea got hit when the Lehman Brothers collapsed, it negotiated a $30B foreign exchange swap with the US Federal Reserve and not the ASEAN+3. (They came later.)

    • Despite increases in commitments, the CMI is still not functional, and the IMF still plays a role when countries tap the CMI for more than 20% of their requirement, detracting from the importance of financial as well policy autonomy for Asia.

 

 

There are certainly elements of response – some quite innovative or at least properly targeted – in Asia. The question is whether Asia is able to turn the crisis on its head, and be able to emerge with another unique contribution to development discourse as it has been known to have done in the past.

 

Moreover, we as civil society and social movements, in our interrogation of possible alternatives, esp. if we have little or no hold on power – the question of how to get that power either by holding political power ourselves or rallying massive constituencies on our side – is key.

 

The final set of points I wish to make has to do with the areas where regional response would be crucial:

 

  • One, the need to focus on internal demand and a more coordinated rationalization of regional demand.

 

    • There is need to re-imagine trade and production cooperation, where instead of competition, the prevailing principles would be cooperation, complementation and solidarity.

    • Such arrangement must address the issue of excess, and should have as outer limit some climate and ecological threshold.

 

  • Two, there is need to overhaul the financial architecture for Asia

 

    • Away from dependence on Northern currencies, esp. the American $

    • And towards the pooling of alternative sources of development finance

    • As well as appropriate surveillance and monitoring systems (without the IMF) that assist countries and build confidence that every one takes responsibility for regional financial stability

 

  • Three, there is need to strengthen regional stockpiling for food security

 

    • South Asia has better experience on this although technically Southeast Asia pledges bigger reserves

    • Away from trade logic and towards regional self-help and development of crisis response capabilities.

 

  • Four, there is need to re-imagine the public

 

    • It is time to talk about the public not only in the narrow confines of the State or the government, but also support different forms of provisioning that allowed communities to survive at a time that the State was neglecting them.

    • It must be recognized that such strength can be scaled up at the national and the regional level.

 

  • Five, whatever alternative we think of, resonance with the people is important.

 

    • We need to start where there is clear demand, and patent need, to make regional arrangements acceptable to the people

      • Migration

      • Rights and democracy

      • Decent living standards and environment

      • Ability to generate economic activity and distribute its fruits equitably

    • There is need to also work on something that works and shows results in the immediate even as the strategic alternative structures are still being constructed.

See Programme and download some of the presentations of the

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises”

DATES: 21 and 22 July 2009
VENUE: PRODEPA, Sala 1, Consejo Nacional del Deporte, Asunción del Paraguay
TIME: 9am-20pm


PROGRAMME


21 JULY

09:00–09:30

Opening: Greeting from organisers

– Enrique Daza, Executive Secretary, Hemispheric Social Alliance, Colombia
– Brid Brennan, TNI/Peoples’ Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms, Netherlands
– Guillermo Ortega, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay
– Héctor Lacognata, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay

09:30–11:30 Systemic Crisis, impacts of the crisis on regional integration processes

– Juan Gonzalez, MOSIP, Argentina
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Tetteh Hormeku, TWN/ATN, Ghana

– Elizabeth Gauthier, Espace Marx, France (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION ENGLISH – POWER POINT / TEXT)

Moderation

Cecilia Olivet,

TNI, Netherlands

11:30-13:30 Regional responses to the crises

– Juan Castillo, Secretary for International Relations PIT-CNT, Uruguay

– Demba Moussa Dembele, African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South, Philippines (PRESENTATION)
– Frederic Viale, ATTAC France

Moderation

José Miguel Hernández,

CTC Nacional/ CC-ASC, Cuba

13:30-15:00 Lunch
15:00-17:30 Regional Integration: Re-thinking the development model. Complementarity versus competition. Integration and Asymmetries

– Jorge Lara Castro, Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay
– Oscar Laborde, Government Argentina

– Tomas Palau, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

– Graciela Rodriguez, REBRIP, Brazil

– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)

– Charles Santiago, Member of Parliament, Malaysia

Moderation

Gonzalo Berrón,

ASC/CSA, Brazil

17:30-18:00 Coffee break
18:00-20:00 Development Model and Infrastructure
– Guilherme Carvalho, Rede Brasil sobre  Instituições Financeiras Multilaterais, Brazil
– Ricardo Miranda, Confederación Sindical Única de Trabajadores Campesinos de Bolivia (CSUTCB), Bolivia
– Michelle Pressend, Trade Strategy Group, South Africa

Moderation

Ximana Centellas,

Directora General de

Gestión Pública,

Viceministerio de

Coordinación y Gestión Gubernamental, Bolivia


22 JULY


09:00-10:45 Energy Crisis and Climate Change: the challenge to find regional solutions

– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines

– Pablo Bertinat, Cono Sur Sustentable, Argentina (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – SPANISH)
– Roberto Colman, Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – SPANISH)
– Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Accion, Spain

Moderation
Fernando Rojas, Decidamos,

Iniciativa Paraguaya por la

Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

10:45-11:00 Coffe Break
11:00-13:00 Production model and Food Sovereignty

– Juan José Dominguez, Member of Parliament, MPP–FA, Uruguay

– Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal
– Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia
– Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe
– Francisca Rodriguez, CONAMURI/CLOC, Chile (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION SPANISH)

Moderation

Martin Prieto, Redes Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay

13:00-14:00 Lunch
14:00–16:00 Finances and development model: New financial structures: (Bank of the South, regional currencies, etc)
– Pedro Paez, President of the Ecuadorian Presidential Technical Commission for the New Regional Financial Architecture and Bank of the South, Ecuador
– Beverly Keene, Jubilee South, Argentina
– Ivan Lukas, Glopolis, Czech Republic

Moderation

Veronique Sandoval, Espace Marx, France

16:00-17:00 Regional Peace, Democracy and Human Rights

– Lee, Seung-Heon, Chief External Relations Department of the Korea Democratic Labor Party, South Korea (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Camille Chalmers, Campaign for Demilitarisation of the Americas, Haiti

– Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Pezo Mateo-Phiri, SAPSN, Zambia (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)

Moderation

Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ

Paraguay/ Iniciativa

Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos, Paraguay

17:00–17:30 Coffee break
17:30–20:00

Round Table: Regional Integration: challenges for the movements and the governments

– Chacho Alvarez, President Committee of Permanent Representatives of MERCOSUR, Argentina
– Ana Cristina Betancourt Garcia, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia
– Gustavo Codas, Government Paraguay
– Franklin Gonzalez, Government Venezuela
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/TNI, Venezuela
– Walden Bello, Focus on the Global South/MP, Philippines
– Nalu Farias, World March of Women, Brazil
– Brid Brennan, TNI, Netherlands
– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa
Moderation
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México


Co- Organisers
Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), Iniciativa Paraguaya para la Integración de los Pueblos, People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR), Focus on the Global South and Transnational Institute (TNI)

In cooperation with
Trade Union Confederation of the Americas (TUCA), Southern African People’s Solidarity Network (SAPSN), People’s SAARC, Solidarity for Asian People’s Advocacy (SAPA)


SEE the COMMUNIQUE: Regional Integration and Itaipu energy agreement (Paraguay, 22 July 2009)

See Programme and download some of the presentations of the

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises”

DATES: 21 and 22 July 2009
VENUE: PRODEPA, Sala 1, seek Consejo Nacional del Deporte, Asunción del Paraguay
TIME: 9am-20pm


PROGRAMME


21 JULY

09:00–09:30

Opening: Greeting from organisers

– Enrique Daza, Executive Secretary, Hemispheric Social Alliance, Colombia
– Brid Brennan, TNI/Peoples’ Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms, Netherlands
– Guillermo Ortega, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay
– Héctor Lacognata, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay

09:30–11:30 Systemic Crisis, impacts of the crisis on regional integration processes

– Juan Gonzalez, MOSIP, Argentina
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Tetteh Hormeku, TWN/ATN, Ghana

– Elizabeth Gauthier, Espace Marx, France (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION ENGLISH – POWER POINT / TEXT)

Moderation

Cecilia Olivet,

TNI, Netherlands

11:30-13:30 Regional responses to the crises

– Juan Castillo, Secretary for International Relations PIT-CNT, Uruguay

– Demba Moussa Dembele, African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South, Philippines
– Frederic Viale, ATTAC France

Moderation

José Miguel Hernández,

CTC Nacional/ CC-ASC, Cuba

13:30-15:00 Lunch
15:00-17:30 Regional Integration: Re-thinking the development model. Complementarity versus competition. Integration and Asymmetries

– Jorge Lara Castro, Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay
– Oscar Laborde, Government Argentina

– Tomas Palau, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

– Graciela Rodriguez, REBRIP, Brazil

– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)

– Charles Santiago, Member of Parliament, Malaysia

Moderation

Gonzalo Berrón,

ASC/CSA, Brazil

17:30-18:00 Coffee break
18:00-20:00 Development Model and Infrastructure
– Guilherme Carvalho, Rede Brasil sobre  Instituições Financeiras Multilaterais, Brazil
– Ricardo Miranda, Confederación Sindical Única de Trabajadores Campesinos de Bolivia (CSUTCB), Bolivia
– Michelle Pressend, Trade Strategy Group, South Africa

Moderation

Ximana Centellas,

Directora General de

Gestión Pública,

Viceministerio de

Coordinación y Gestión Gubernamental, Bolivia


22 JULY


09:00-10:45 Energy Crisis and Climate Change: the challenge to find regional solutions

– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines

– Pablo Bertinat, Cono Sur Sustentable, Argentina (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – SPANISH)
– Roberto Colman, Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – SPANISH)
– Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Accion, Spain

Moderation
Fernando Rojas, Decidamos,

Iniciativa Paraguaya por la

Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

10:45-11:00 Coffe Break
11:00-13:00 Production model and Food Sovereignty

– Juan José Dominguez, Member of Parliament, MPP–FA, Uruguay

– Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal
– Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia
– Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe
– Francisca Rodriguez, CONAMURI/CLOC, Chile (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION SPANISH)

Moderation

Martin Prieto, Redes Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay

13:00-14:00 Lunch
14:00–16:00 Finances and development model: New financial structures: (Bank of the South, regional currencies, etc)
– Pedro Paez, President of the Ecuadorian Presidential Technical Commission for the New Regional Financial Architecture and Bank of the South, Ecuador
– Beverly Keene, Jubilee South, Argentina
– Ivan Lukas, Glopolis, Czech Republic

Moderation

Veronique Sandoval, Espace Marx, France

16:00-17:00 Regional Peace, Democracy and Human Rights

– Lee, Seung-Heon, Chief External Relations Department of the Korea Democratic Labor Party, South Korea (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Camille Chalmers, Campaign for Demilitarisation of the Americas, Haiti

– Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Pezo Mateo-Phiri, SAPSN, Zambia (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)

Moderation

Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ

Paraguay/ Iniciativa

Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos, Paraguay

17:00–17:30 Coffee break
17:30–20:00

Round Table: Regional Integration: challenges for the movements and the governments

– Chacho Alvarez, President Committee of Permanent Representatives of MERCOSUR, Argentina
– Ana Cristina Betancourt Garcia, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia
– Gustavo Codas, Government Paraguay
– Franklin Gonzalez, Government Venezuela
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/TNI, Venezuela
– Walden Bello, Focus on the Global South/MP, Philippines
– Nalu Farias, World March of Women, Brazil
– Brid Brennan, TNI, Netherlands
– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa
Moderation
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México


Co- Organisers
Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), Iniciativa Paraguaya para la Integración de los Pueblos, People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR), Focus on the Global South and Transnational Institute (TNI)

In cooperation with
Trade Union Confederation of the Americas (TUCA), Southern African People’s Solidarity Network (SAPSN), People’s SAARC, Solidarity for Asian People’s Advocacy (SAPA)


SEE the COMMUNIQUE: Regional Integration and Itaipu energy agreement (Paraguay, 22 July 2009)

See Programme and download some of the presentations of the

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises”

DATES: 21 and 22 July 2009
VENUE: PRODEPA, salve Sala 1, clinic Consejo Nacional del Deporte, purchase Asunción del Paraguay
TIME: 9am-20pm


PROGRAMME


21 JULY

09:00–09:30

Opening: Greeting from organisers

– Enrique Daza, Executive Secretary, Hemispheric Social Alliance, Colombia
– Brid Brennan, TNI/Peoples’ Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms, Netherlands
– Guillermo Ortega, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay
– Héctor Lacognata, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay

09:30–11:30 Systemic Crisis, impacts of the crisis on regional integration processes

– Juan Gonzalez, MOSIP, Argentina
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Tetteh Hormeku, TWN/ATN, Ghana

– Elizabeth Gauthier, Espace Marx, France (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION ENGLISH – POWER POINT / TEXT)

Moderation

Cecilia Olivet,

TNI, Netherlands

11:30-13:30 Regional responses to the crises

– Juan Castillo, Secretary for International Relations PIT-CNT, Uruguay

– Demba Moussa Dembele, African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South, Philippines (PRESENTATION)
– Frederic Viale, ATTAC France

Moderation

José Miguel Hernández,

CTC Nacional/ CC-ASC, Cuba

13:30-15:00 Lunch
15:00-17:30 Regional Integration: Re-thinking the development model. Complementarity versus competition. Integration and Asymmetries

– Jorge Lara Castro, Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay
– Oscar Laborde, Government Argentina

– Tomas Palau, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

– Graciela Rodriguez, REBRIP, Brazil

– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)

– Charles Santiago, Member of Parliament, Malaysia

Moderation

Gonzalo Berrón,

ASC/CSA, Brazil

17:30-18:00 Coffee break
18:00-20:00 Development Model and Infrastructure
– Guilherme Carvalho, Rede Brasil sobre  Instituições Financeiras Multilaterais, Brazil
– Ricardo Miranda, Confederación Sindical Única de Trabajadores Campesinos de Bolivia (CSUTCB), Bolivia
– Michelle Pressend, Trade Strategy Group, South Africa

Moderation

Ximana Centellas,

Directora General de

Gestión Pública,

Viceministerio de

Coordinación y Gestión Gubernamental, Bolivia


22 JULY


09:00-10:45 Energy Crisis and Climate Change: the challenge to find regional solutions

– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines

– Pablo Bertinat, Cono Sur Sustentable, Argentina (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – SPANISH)
– Roberto Colman, Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – SPANISH)
– Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Accion, Spain

Moderation
Fernando Rojas, Decidamos,

Iniciativa Paraguaya por la

Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

10:45-11:00 Coffe Break
11:00-13:00 Production model and Food Sovereignty

– Juan José Dominguez, Member of Parliament, MPP–FA, Uruguay

– Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal
– Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia
– Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe
– Francisca Rodriguez, CONAMURI/CLOC, Chile (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION SPANISH)

Moderation

Martin Prieto, Redes Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay

13:00-14:00 Lunch
14:00–16:00 Finances and development model: New financial structures: (Bank of the South, regional currencies, etc)
– Pedro Paez, President of the Ecuadorian Presidential Technical Commission for the New Regional Financial Architecture and Bank of the South, Ecuador
– Beverly Keene, Jubilee South, Argentina
– Ivan Lukas, Glopolis, Czech Republic

Moderation

Veronique Sandoval, Espace Marx, France

16:00-17:00 Regional Peace, Democracy and Human Rights

– Lee, Seung-Heon, Chief External Relations Department of the Korea Democratic Labor Party, South Korea (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Camille Chalmers, Campaign for Demilitarisation of the Americas, Haiti

– Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Pezo Mateo-Phiri, SAPSN, Zambia (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)

Moderation

Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ

Paraguay/ Iniciativa

Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos, Paraguay

17:00–17:30 Coffee break
17:30–20:00

Round Table: Regional Integration: challenges for the movements and the governments

– Chacho Alvarez, President Committee of Permanent Representatives of MERCOSUR, Argentina
– Ana Cristina Betancourt Garcia, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia
– Gustavo Codas, Government Paraguay
– Franklin Gonzalez, Government Venezuela
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/TNI, Venezuela
– Walden Bello, Focus on the Global South/MP, Philippines
– Nalu Farias, World March of Women, Brazil
– Brid Brennan, TNI, Netherlands
– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa
Moderation
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México


Co- Organisers
Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), Iniciativa Paraguaya para la Integración de los Pueblos, People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR), Focus on the Global South and Transnational Institute (TNI)

In cooperation with
Trade Union Confederation of the Americas (TUCA), Southern African People’s Solidarity Network (SAPSN), People’s SAARC, Solidarity for Asian People’s Advocacy (SAPA)


SEE the COMMUNIQUE: Regional Integration and Itaipu energy agreement (Paraguay, 22 July 2009)

See Programme and download some of the presentations of the

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises”

DATES: 21 and 22 July 2009
VENUE: PRODEPA, troche ask Sala 1, Consejo Nacional del Deporte, Asunción del Paraguay
TIME: 9am-20pm


PROGRAMME


21 JULY

09:00–09:30

Opening: Greeting from organisers

– Enrique Daza, Executive Secretary, Hemispheric Social Alliance, Colombia
– Brid Brennan, TNI/Peoples’ Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms, Netherlands
– Guillermo Ortega, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay
– Héctor Lacognata, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay

09:30–11:30 Systemic Crisis, impacts of the crisis on regional integration processes

– Juan Gonzalez, MOSIP, Argentina
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Tetteh Hormeku, TWN/ATN, Ghana

– Elizabeth Gauthier, Espace Marx, France (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION ENGLISH – POWER POINT / TEXT)

Moderation

Cecilia Olivet,

TNI, Netherlands

11:30-13:30 Regional responses to the crises

– Juan Castillo, Secretary for International Relations PIT-CNT, Uruguay

– Demba Moussa Dembele, African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South, Philippines (PRESENTATION)
– Frederic Viale, ATTAC France

Moderation

José Miguel Hernández,

CTC Nacional/ CC-ASC, Cuba

13:30-15:00 Lunch
15:00-17:30 Regional Integration: Re-thinking the development model. Complementarity versus competition. Integration and Asymmetries

– Jorge Lara Castro, Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay
– Oscar Laborde, Government Argentina

– Tomas Palau, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

– Graciela Rodriguez, REBRIP, Brazil

– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)

– Charles Santiago, Member of Parliament, Malaysia

Moderation

Gonzalo Berrón,

ASC/CSA, Brazil

17:30-18:00 Coffee break
18:00-20:00 Development Model and Infrastructure
– Guilherme Carvalho, Rede Brasil sobre  Instituições Financeiras Multilaterais, Brazil
– Ricardo Miranda, Confederación Sindical Única de Trabajadores Campesinos de Bolivia (CSUTCB), Bolivia
– Michelle Pressend, Trade Strategy Group, South Africa

Moderation

Ximana Centellas,

Directora General de

Gestión Pública,

Viceministerio de

Coordinación y Gestión Gubernamental, Bolivia


22 JULY


09:00-10:45 Energy Crisis and Climate Change: the challenge to find regional solutions

– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines

– Pablo Bertinat, Cono Sur Sustentable, Argentina (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – SPANISH)
– Roberto Colman, Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – SPANISH)
– Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Accion, Spain

Moderation
Fernando Rojas, Decidamos,

Iniciativa Paraguaya por la

Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

10:45-11:00 Coffe Break
11:00-13:00 Production model and Food Sovereignty

– Juan José Dominguez, Member of Parliament, MPP–FA, Uruguay

– Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal
– Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia
– Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe
– Francisca Rodriguez, CONAMURI/CLOC, Chile (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION SPANISH)

Moderation

Martin Prieto, Redes Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay

13:00-14:00 Lunch
14:00–16:00 Finances and development model: New financial structures: (Bank of the South, regional currencies, etc)
– Pedro Paez, President of the Ecuadorian Presidential Technical Commission for the New Regional Financial Architecture and Bank of the South, Ecuador
– Beverly Keene, Jubilee South, Argentina
– Ivan Lukas, Glopolis, Czech Republic

Moderation

Veronique Sandoval, Espace Marx, France

16:00-17:00 Regional Peace, Democracy and Human Rights

– Lee, Seung-Heon, Chief External Relations Department of the Korea Democratic Labor Party, South Korea (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Camille Chalmers, Campaign for Demilitarisation of the Americas, Haiti

– Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Pezo Mateo-Phiri, SAPSN, Zambia (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)

Moderation

Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ

Paraguay/ Iniciativa

Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos, Paraguay

17:00–17:30 Coffee break
17:30–20:00

Round Table: Regional Integration: challenges for the movements and the governments

– Chacho Alvarez, President Committee of Permanent Representatives of MERCOSUR, Argentina
– Ana Cristina Betancourt Garcia, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia
– Gustavo Codas, Government Paraguay
– Franklin Gonzalez, Government Venezuela
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/TNI, Venezuela
– Walden Bello, Focus on the Global South/MP, Philippines
– Nalu Farias, World March of Women, Brazil
– Brid Brennan, TNI, Netherlands
– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa
Moderation
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México


Co- Organisers
Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), Iniciativa Paraguaya para la Integración de los Pueblos, People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR), Focus on the Global South and Transnational Institute (TNI)

In cooperation with
Trade Union Confederation of the Americas (TUCA), Southern African People’s Solidarity Network (SAPSN), People’s SAARC, Solidarity for Asian People’s Advocacy (SAPA)


SEE the COMMUNIQUE: Regional Integration and Itaipu energy agreement (Paraguay, 22 July 2009)

20 October 2009, capsule sickness 18-21hs, Cha-am, shop Thailand

This Public Forum was held during the 2nd ASEAN Peoples’ Forum / 5th ASEAN Civil Society Conference 18-20 October 2009 Cha-am, Phetchaburi Province, Thailand

Introduction

Finding solutions to the crises (economic, energy, food, climate and security) is urgent, and today it is at the core of the agenda of both social movements and governments. For countries in the different regions, regional integration appears as a way to overcome the global economic crisis through the development of solidarity and dynamic intra-regional economic ties.

In this context, re-thinking regional integration as a solution to the crisis can give a powerful impulse to building an alternative development project in each region (Latin America, Asia, Africa and Europe) that is more sustainable and equitable than the current development model which countries follow today.

However, the current regional spaces are contested arenas. It is crucial, therefore, that social movements search and seek for common strategies.

The Open Forum will advance the debate and cross-fertilisation of experiences among social movements and civil society organisations from Latin America, Asia and Europe about the possibilities to respond to these crises through regional alternatives and a model of regional integration that promotes a change in the development model of the regions. It will aim to highlight the challenges and possibilities of moving forward in the concretisation of regional alternatives to the economic, financial, food, climate and energy crises that place the interest of people and the planet at its center.

PROGRAMME

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from South East Asia (ASEAN)
Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South/SAPA/ACSC, Philippines

 

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from Latin America
Diana Aguiar, IGTN/REBRIP/Hemispheric Social Alliance, Brazil

 

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from South Asia (SAARC)

Mohammed Mahuruf, People’s SAARC, Sri Lanka

 

European regional responses to the crisis and People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms
Cecilia Olivet, Transnational Institute, Netherlands

Open Forum Discussion: The potential of regional alternatives and the need for cross-regional networking – focus and priorities

Moderator: Aya Fabros, Focus on the Global South, Philippines

 

Co-Convenors:

Focus on the Global South, Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), People’s SAARC, Transnational Institute (TNI) and People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR)

 

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } A:link { color: #0000ff } –>

20 October 2009, sovaldi sale 18-21hs, Cha-am, Thailand

This Public Forum was held during the 2nd ASEAN Peoples’ Forum / 5th ASEAN Civil Society Conference 18-20 October 2009 Cha-am, Phetchaburi Province, Thailand

Introduction

Finding solutions to the crises (economic, energy, food, climate and security) is urgent, and today it is at the core of the agenda of both social movements and governments. For countries in the different regions, regional integration appears as a way to overcome the global economic crisis through the development of solidarity and dynamic intra-regional economic ties.

In this context, re-thinking regional integration as a solution to the crisis can give a powerful impulse to building an alternative development project in each region (Latin America, Asia, Africa and Europe) that is more sustainable and equitable than the current development model which countries follow today.

However, the current regional spaces are contested arenas. It is crucial, therefore, that social movements search and seek for common strategies.

The Open Forum will advance the debate and cross-fertilisation of experiences among social movements and civil society organisations from Latin America, Asia and Europe about the possibilities to respond to these crises through regional alternatives and a model of regional integration that promotes a change in the development model of the regions. It will aim to highlight the challenges and possibilities of moving forward in the concretisation of regional alternatives to the economic, financial, food, climate and energy crises that place the interest of people and the planet at its center.

PROGRAMME

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from South East Asia (ASEAN)
Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South/SAPA/ACSC, Philippines

 

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from Latin America
Diana Aguiar, IGTN/REBRIP/Hemispheric Social Alliance, Brazil

 

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from South Asia (SAARC)

Mohammed Mahuruf, People’s SAARC, Sri Lanka

 

European regional responses to the crisis and People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms
Cecilia Olivet, Transnational Institute, Netherlands

Open Forum Discussion: The potential of regional alternatives and the need for cross-regional networking – focus and priorities

Moderator: Aya Fabros, Focus on the Global South, Philippines

 

Co-Convenors:

Focus on the Global South, Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), People’s SAARC, Transnational Institute (TNI) and People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR)

 

Cha-am, cheap Thailand, 18 – 20 October 2009

We, more than 500 delegates at the 2nd ASEAN Peoples’ Forum (APF II) / 5th ASEAN Civil Society Conference (ACSC V), representing various civil society organizations and , movements of workers from rural and urban sectors as well as migrant sector, peasants and farmers, women, children, youth, the elderly, people with disability, urban poor, indigenous peoples, ethnic minorities, fisher folks, stateless persons and other vulnerable groups, gathered together in Cha-am, Thailand, 18-20 October 2009 to discuss the main concerns confronting the peoples of ASEAN and developing key proposals for the 15th ASEAN Summit.

We would like to extend our deepest condolences and solidarity with victims and survivors of the natural disasters currently affecting lives of people in Cambodia, Indonesia, the Philippines, Vietnam, and the Pacific. We call for ASEAN to ensure the protection for the population affected by natural disasters encompasses all relevant guarantees which include civil and political rights as well as economic, social and cultural rights. These rights are attributed to the people through fundamental human rights and international humanitarian law. We urge governments to take concrete measures to eliminate all forms of discrimination, especially against women and minorities, in the relief, humanitarian assistance and development processes following the occurrence of these disasters.

We reaffirm the fundamental principles of democracy, human rights and dignity, good governance, the best interests of the child, meaningful and substantive peoples’ participation, and sustainable development in the pursuit of economic, social, gender and ecological justice so as to bring peace and prosperity to the ASEAN region.

We are deeply disappointed by the absence of our government officials in this meeting. This is a step backward on ASEAN’s commitment to promote a people-oriented ASEAN. It runs contrary to the principles in the ASEAN Charter that encourages people’s participation. We call on ASEAN to recognise the role of civil society and institutionalize people’s participation and engagement in all the ASEAN processes and pillars.

Human conditions and issues confronting the peoples cut across all current pillars of the ASEAN. ASEAN governments must adopt a more holistic approach with regards to development, equal and just treatment of the peoples, and harmonize its policies and practices of all its pillars. Particularly, human rights violations experienced by women and girl-children are often compounded by the intersection of different and multiple layers of discrimination resulting from the intersection of gender with other systems of power, such as race, class/caste, rural location, ethnicity, immigrant status, sexual orientation and gender identities, citizenship, religion and other factors. Furthermore, the principle of free, prior and informed consent of for all peoples, especially indigenous peoples must be pursued in the fulfilment of all political, economic and social agreements under the ASEAN. The ASEAN must ensure that its development initiatives do not further aggravate global warming.

Economic Pillar

The ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) envisions a stable, prosperous and highly competitive region with equitable economic development, reduced poverty and economic disparities through complete liberalization and opening up of the regional economy by 2015. However, this framework of a competitive market economy, which mainly benefits MNCs/TNCs, and developed by ASEAN governments, has impoverished people, undermined, and harmed livelihoods , especially small scale farmers, fishers, and workers in developing countries. This has further exacerbated regional asymmetries and has lead to greater inequality and dispossession. The economic integration model pursued by ASEAN has negatively impacted local and migrant workers and their families, including the undocumented, stateless, and people with HIV/AIDS; especially where working conditions, livelihoods and living standards have deteriorated.

We will work in unity to ensure that all ASEAN workers enjoy basic workers’ rights as outlined in the ILO core labour standards. We urge governments to facilitate dialogue between trade unions, civil society, and employers at national and ASEAN levels.

7 We call on ASEAN to institute rights-based pathways to regularize semi and low-skilled labor migration, reduce barriers to cross-border and internal migration, and guarantee labor protection for informal workers, especially domestic workers. To achieve these objectives, we demand the protection of migrants’ rights regardless of legal status, such as those of undocumented migrant workers. We urge ASEAN governments to respond to the impacts of the global financial crisis in a sustainable way by investing in a strong social economic infrastructure, specifically in the sectors of education, public healthcare, childcare, social insurance and rural areas. This infrastructure should create sustainable growth and long-term employment. Working women comprise 60% of the workforce, are threatened by the financial crisis. We urge the ASEAN to take immediate steps to extend social protection to women workers.

We ask ASEAN to support and cooperate with the peoples to conduct independent and strategic assessments in trade and investment agreements, projects, and industrial processes before they are negotiated. They should use the following assessments: Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), Social Impact Assessment (SIA), Human Impact Assessment (HIA) and gender impact assessment. Any trading agreement must not have a negative impact on access to medicine and medical treatment.

ASEAN must enforce fundamental rights of people to access medical treatment including medical technology and medicine. Therefore, any trading agreement must not have a negative impact on such access.

We urge ASEAN to give priority to building a people’s community, supporting grassroots economies and peoples’ livelihoods, including traditional occupations. We reject the unbridled liberalization of investments in intensive industrial agriculture in the sector of land and marine aquaculture that gives MNCs and TNCs undue control over fisheries, forests farmlands, and other natural resources. It should invest in building people’s capacity to participate in the decision making processes in trade and investment activities instead of favoring MNCs and TNCs. Its economic policies must be responsive to sensitive sectors such as food security, and must reject investment liberalization in the sectors of agriculture, aqua culture, both marine and inland, and forestry.

10. We call on the attention and action of ASEAN to the cause of small fisherfolk. The Coral Triangle Initiative (CTI) in particular has the objective of preserving fishing grounds in the region yet there is no consultation with small fishers. The millions of fisherfolk, especially in the South China Sea, must be heard and supported by ASEAN. Further, we reiterate our call on ASEAN to come up with a Council for Small Farmers, Fishers, Social Entrepreneurs and Producers and create agricultural policies that uphold the rights of small farmers, food sovereignty, and protect land rights.

11. We call upon all ASEAN states that have not done so to ratify the International Convention on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, and ask the AICHR to ensure full ratification, and that its provisions are fully implemented in law and in practice.

12. We call on ASEAN to develop a common ASEAN trade policy that:
12.1 defines terms and principles that will govern future trade agreements;
12.2 sets the parameters for levies and renegotiation of existing FTAs and EPAs;
12.3 strengthens parliamentary scrutiny of these agreements;
12.4 opens the negotiation and trade policy process to peoples’ participation; and
12.5 develops a framework on investment regulation, which recognizes the rights of member countries to regulate investments in a manner consistent with determined development needs and priorities.

13. We oppose all speculative activities, especially those related to agricultural products, land, and basic commodities. Governments should develop mechanisms to prevent speculative activities and impose controls on speculative activities in the distribution and re-distribution of resources.

Socio- Cultural Pillar

The primary goal of the ASEAN Socio-Cultural Community (ASCC) is to contribute to the realization of an ASEAN Community that “is people-centered and socially responsible with a view to achieving enduring solidarity and unity among the nations and peoples of ASEAN by forging a common identity and building a caring and sharing society which is inclusive and harmonious where the well-being, livelihood, and welfare of the peoples are enhanced”. The ASCC aims to address the region’s aspiration to lift the quality of life of its peoples through cooperative activities that are people-oriented towards the promotion of sustainable development. While respecting the building of a caring and sharing society in ASEAN, we call on ASEAN to adopt the people-centered which is transformative social agenda that includes the principles of equity, substantive equality, inclusion, solidarity and sustainability.

14. ASEAN must ensure that people live with dignity and a barrier-free society by ensuring delivery of adequate, appropriate, accessible, quality, and essential services for all, especially for poor and vulnerable groups. Such essential services encompass access to employment/livelihood, food, housing, universal healthcare, education, safe and clean water, electricity and social protection pensions and securities.

15. We call on the ASEAN to recognize and respect distinct identities, cultures and ways of life, including indigenous peoples. As a region we must ensure their continuing cultural diversity, collective survival, development, protection against commodification and commercialization. We call on ASEAN to address the issue of statelessness and ensure stateless peoples have access to basic rights and benefits in ASEAN society.

16. The ASEAN Youth Policy must prioritize ensure the participation of young people in related ASEAN processes, universal health care, decent employment, human rights and the development of life skills of children, such as sexual and reproductive health rights education and HIV/AIDS. It must ensure that HIV/AIDS is part of the health and education agenda in all ASEAN countries. It must also promote local wisdom education through youth networking and youth volunteerism.

17. We call on the ASEAN Committee on the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Migrant Workers (ACMW) to refer to the civil society submission on the framework for the protection of migrant workers and their families regardless of status; and ensure that the ASEAN instrument on the protection of migrant workers is a legally binding instrument throughout the region. We reiterate our call in the 1st ASEAN Peoples Forum/4th ASEAN Civil Society Conference to ASEAN member states to ratify the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members and Members of Their Families.

18. The ASEAN Commission of the Protection and Promotion of the Rights of Women and Children (ACWC) must be an independent specialised body to promote, protect and fully realise the human rights and fundamental freedoms of women and children in the Southeast Asia. It must uphold the principles of non-discrimination and substantive equality as enshrined in United Nations Convention on the Elimination on the Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), as well as uphold the principles of best interests of the child and children’s participation as enshrined in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC).

19. We acknowledge the ongoing process of establishing ACWC and stress that its Terms of References (TOR) should have balanced protection and promotion mandates. It should be vested with a strong protection mandate with the following mechanisms: on-site country visits, conduct investigations and issue recommendations to a member state. It should also be able to follow-up on those recommendations to the states, receive individual complaints, and institute a mechanism for receiving and addressing complaints. We urge the Working Group on ACWC to ensure the ACWC’s mandate includes that of seeking redress and guarantees of non-recurrence, undertaking independent periodic reviews and monitoring of national laws and policies in order to identify discriminatory laws and policies.

20. The ACWC shall be composed of independent experts selected through a democratic and transparent process with direct participation and consultation with civil society. We are concerned that the non-inclusion of protection mandates sends a signal to children that ASEAN is unwilling and incapable of ensuring their safety and security amidst existing threats they experience – armed conflict, exploitation, cultural degradation, displacement, and lack of access to opportunities.

21. The ACWC must ensure violations of human rights and fundamental freedoms of women and other marginalized groups cannot be justified or legitimized in the name of culture, tradition or so-called “Asian values.”

Political-Security Pillar

The ASEAN Political-Security Community (APSC) envisions the peoples and Member States of ASEAN live in peace with one another and with the world at large in a just, democratic and harmonious environment. It aims to promote political development in adherence to the principles of democracy, the rule of law and good governance, respect for and promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms as inscribed in the ASEAN Charter. APSC shall be “a means by which ASEAN Member States can pursue closer interaction and cooperation to forge shared norms and create common mechanisms to achieve ASEAN’s goals and objectives in the political and security fields”. While appreciating that the APSC mentions the promotion of a people-oriented ASEAN in which all sectors of society, we perceive that the APSC is still state-centric. ASEAN and its member states must work hard to institutionalize its involvement with civil society on political and security issues. Civil society should have a direct and substantive engagement in the national and regional political security community to gather inputs on, assess and assist in the implementation of the blueprint.

22. We applaud the establishment of the AICHR and the open selection process of commissioners by Indonesia and Thailand. AICHR should use its mandate to develop strategies for the promotion and protection of human rights and establish strong mechanisms to protect human rights, including country visits, complaint handling of human rights violations, periodic reviews of the human rights situation in ASEAN member states, and a recourse mechanism against violations.

23. AICHR must encourage ASEAN members to ratify and implement all international mechanisms relevant to human rights standards and appoint an indigenous expert to advise the AICHR on the human rights concerns of indigenous, ethnic, and religious minorities, especially the Rohingya peoples. AICHR must establish a mechanism for consultation between member states and indigenous peoples to address the issues and concerns of indigenous peoples. These consultations can be participated in by concerned UN agencies and national human rights mechanisms.

24. We call on ASEAN to take a more pro-active role in responding to all conflict situations, including Mindanao, South Thailand, West Papua, Burma/Myanmar and the South China Sea. ASEAN must continue to monitor and learn from the post-conflict and peace building challenges in Aceh and Timor Leste.

25. It is also time for ASEAN to seriously address justice, impunity and reconciliation issues, including regressions of democracy in the region.

26. AICHR should immediately investigate ongoing widespread or systematic human rights violations [including criminalization of legitimate community actions], especially situations of systematic rape and other forms of sexual violence and violations commited against women and girl-children, use and/or recruitment of child soldiers, forced labour, extrajudicial killings and other serious human rights violations in affected countries. Countries which commit serious breaches of the charter, including violations of good governance, human rights and the rule of law should be referred to the ASEAN Summit for discussion. We call for AICHR to complement and support the work of mechanisms and representatives of the UN Human Rights Council working on matters of particular relevance to the region, including the Special Rapporteurs on Burma/Myanmar and Cambodia respectively, as well as those working on thematic issues such as torture, violence against women, independence of the judiciary, and human rights defenders.

27. ASEAN must work to promote democratization and establish independent election commissions to ensure free, fair, and clean elections are held in member states. ASEAN must take firm measures to ensure that before the 2010 elections in Myanmar/ Burma, there is genuine political dialogue between all stakeholders, as well as an inclusive review of the unilaterally written 2008 constitution.

28. All political prisoners, including those who are charged under Lese Majeste laws and draconian laws in ASEAN member states must be unconditionally released, especially Aung San Suu Kyi and the over 2,100 political prisoners in Myanmar/ Burma.

29. ASEAN should address the persistent failures and denial of the responsibilities of ASEAN States to refugees, Internally Displaced Peoples (IDPs) and other persons of concern and call on the ASEAN member states to immediately ratify the United Nations Convention on Refugees, and adhere to Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement as well as principles of non-refoulement under international law. ASEAN states should also grant documentation to the stateless, especially to those who have been denied recognition in their countries of origin, such as the Rohingya.

30. APSC needs to further elaborate on its support of a comprehensive approach to security, especially concerning gender mainstreaming – encouraging women’s participation on all levels, especially as agents and decision makers in conflict resolution, and protecting women’s security in their homes, communities, nationally, and regionally.

31. ASEAN must establish legal frameworks that are in accordance with international laws, in order to address issues of armed conflict, develop indicators, and ensure that human rights and human security is guaranteed in all conflict-situations. ASEAN should uphold and institutionalize mechanisms to ensure the upholding of peace-oriented norms, including arms control, the renunciation of use of force, nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction (WMD).

32. ASEAN should work to develop and enhance specific mechanisms to ensure a peaceful ASEAN, including the implementation of the agreed Declaration of Conduct in the South China Sea. ASEAN needs to expand its dispute settlement mechanism to include conflict prevention and post-conflict processes.

33. We call on ASEAN to ensure cultural integrity for all peoples, including respect for languages, and develop mechanisms to resolve and address intra-state conflict, on-going conflicts, emerging threats, and uphold the universal right to self-determination of peoples, including indigenous peoples. ASEAN governments should review their laws and policies to ensure full protection of freedom of expression, association, assembly and religion.

34. ASEAN must end the culture of impunity by strengthening genuine, just and a transparent judicial system, as well as create a mechanism to protect human rights defenders.

Environment Pillar

In response to the urgent, multi-fold environmental crisis and climate change, ASEAN must instigate a process to launch a fourth pillar on Environment in its structure and governance that will place environmental sustainability, economic, gender, social and climate justice at the center of decision-making. ASEAN’s current economic expansion propels the implementation of large-scale development projects, such as mines, dams, nuclear power plants, and industrial plantations that have led to environmental degradation and caused negative impacts on the culture and livelihoods of local and indigenous peoples. Commodification of knowledge, practices and natural resources through trade agreements, investments and patenting has alienated communities, especially indigenous peoples, from the use of their own resources. Collective rights over land, territories and resources continue to be denied and violated in the name of development. The climate crisis brought about by this development model is now an everyday reality, witnessed through increasingly frequent extreme weather events that are impacting the ASEAN region and its peoples and requires an immediate response.

35. We call on ASEAN to recognize that indigenous peoples play a central role in protecting the environment and biodiversity and create mechanisms to ensure accountability for the protection of the environment and communities. We also call on ASEAN governments to sign and implement the Extractive Industry Transparency Initiative (EITI) in order to ensure that natural resources are well managed and used equitably with transparency.

36. The environment pillar should address the gender-differentiated impact, particularly on women, in relation to development projects, climate change and disaster relief management and rehabilitation. Further, patriarchy reinforces the chain of discrimination and multiple forms of rights violations, putting women in a more vulnerable situation such as increased risk in the continuum of sexual violence. In addition, development projects such as mining projects have adverse effect on women’s right to health, particularly their reproductive health rights.

37. We call on ASEAN to:

37.1 Promote and protect rights-based access to resources that respect indigenous land rights, fulfils the principle of non-discrimination and substantive equality, and promotes people’s sovereignty over food, energy, forests, fisheries, land and water, and sustainable farming practices. Large and transnational corporations must be compelled to protect human rights and adhere to international and national environmental human right standards and conventions.
37.2 Apply the ‘precautionary principle’ of Agenda 21, the ‘respect-protect-remedy’ principle of the UN Human Rights Council, and environmental, social and cultural impact assessments for development projects.
37.3 Implement a complete review, and where necessary revision, of economic activities, especially cross-border investments among the member countries to ensure that they comply with the commitments of the new environment pillar.
37.4 Create an ASEAN disaster research centre that will compile geo-hazards assessments of each member states and incorporate local and indigenous knowledge in the formulation of an ASEAN disaster response and mitigation/ adaptation strategy that uphold the principle of on-discrimination with periodic updating and consultation with peoples.
37.5 Ensure necessary relief and protection be accorded to victims of all natural calamities, including those resulting from climate change.
37.6 Establish a blueprint and implementation mechanism to operationalise the environment pillar. An independent regional monitoring mechanism should be established that is mandated to formulate rules on trans-boundary utilization and sharing of natural resources and resolve cross-border impacts where national law is inadequate.
37.7 Demand for the payment of all ecological and climate debts from the developed countries.

Our Commitments

38. We, the people of ASEAN, will continue to mobilize the participation of more grassroots and marginalized communities (such as women, children, indigenous and migrants), peoples’ organizations and civil society organizations to work together in using this platform for interaction and dialogue among the peoples’ of ASEAN.

39. We, in solidarity with the voice of the people of Myanmar/ Burma, call upon the government of Myanmar to take concrete steps towards national reconciliation to ensure that the 2010 elections are truly free and fair and the country can move towards genuine democracy.

40. We commit to continue our unique brand of people-to-people solidarity and dialogue in ensuring a peoples-oriented ASEAN is realised. We will continue to engage with ASEAN governments in 2010 in Vietnam during the 16th ASEAN Summit to monitor and follow up on the peoples’ demands to ASEAN. We call on the Vietnamese government as the next chair of ASEAN and the next host of ASEAN Summit, to support us to maintain and further strengthen the dialogue and broad engagement of civil society with ASEAN.

END

* NOTE OF DISSENT:

The Cambodia-ASEAN Center for Human Rights Development, Cambodia-ASEAN Youth Association, Cambodia-ASEAN Civil Society and Positive Change of Cambodia have submitted a declaration of disagreement for the entire statement, dated 20 October 2009.

Daw Than Nwe, on behalf of 10 organizations from Myanmar submitted a declaration of disagreement for the last sentence of the Paragraph 27 “we cannot accept the words, as well as an inclusive review of unilaterally written 2008 constitution” on 20 October 2009. The organizations are: Union Solidarity and Development Association, Myanmar Anti-Narcotics Association, Myanmar Textiles Entrepreneurs Association, U Win Mra (Director-General –Retired, Ministry of Foreign Affairs), Myanmar Women Affairs Federation, Myanmar Textiles Entrepreneurs Association, Thanlyin Institute of Technology (Senior Officer, Research Division on National Interest), Union of Myanmar Federation of Chamber of Commerce of Industry, Myanmar Women Affairs Federation, Dr. Daw Wah Wah Maung (Lecturer, Yangon Institute of Economics).

Manifiesto General de la Primera Cumbre de Consejos de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP

4 y 5 de Diciembre 2006, previa a la II Cumbre de de la Comunidad Sudamérica de Naciones, clinic cincuenta lideres y lideresas indígenas de nueve países suramericanos discutieron en Cochabamba sobre la integración suramericana. Posteriormente,
del 6 a 9 de Diciembre, y en paralelo a la Cumbre presidencial se organizó la Cumbre Social por la Integración de los Pueblos. La Cumbre Social por la Integración de los Pueblos fue un espacio único de participación y dialogo entre actores gubernamentales y de la sociedad civil. Como resultado, 13 sesiones temáticas formularon propuestas para la institucionalidad de la integración suramericana. Una de estas sesiones fue la Sesión de los Pueblos Indígenas y Naciones Originarios, en la cuál los líderes mencionados anteriormente tuvieron un papel protagonista. Muchos de ellos y ellas forman parte de la Coordinadora Andina de Organizaciones Indígenas (CAOI). Estos eventos y posteriores actividades de la sociedad civil Suramericana dirigidas a “Otra Suramérica posible”, y específicamente las acciones referidas a la integración Suramericana que implementó la CAOI entre el inicio de 2007 y mayo 2009, forman la base de este documento. El libro analiza los procesos de la integración Suramericana desde una perspectiva amplia, relacionándoles a los procesos de la integración interamericano, latinoamericano, y regional (por ejemplo Andes, Amazonía, Cono Sur). Asimismo, partiendo de las propuestas de la sociedad civil ya formuladas, particularmente las de CAOI, el libro elabora algunas ideas para una posible institucionalidad suramericana Específicamente, el libro argumenta que la integración suramericana debe tener un carácter propio continental incluyendo los pensamientos andino-amazónicos y respetando los derechos humanos y de la naturaleza. En este sentido, se describen los crecientes impactos sociales y ambientales de la Iniciativa para la Integración de la Infraestructura Regional Sudamericana (IIRSA) y se discuten varios hitos importantes referidos a la integración suramericana: por ejemplo la construcción de la Unión de las Naciones Suramericanas (UNASUR), y la construcción del Banco del Sur. Integración es la construcción de múltiples puentes. Por lo tanto adicionalmente se estudian diferentes corrientes políticas y filosóficas que tienen un papel importante en la construcción de la integración suramericana y las posibilidades de seducir a los sectores que tienen diferentes opiniones, para definir como se puede tener una articulación que óptimamente podrá contribuir a una integración suramericana que de un lado promueva acciones económicas, sociales, culturales y ambientales conjuntas a nivel de América del Sur para el bienestar de su población y su naturaleza y de otro lado promueva un papel protagonista de Suramérica en la confrontación de las crisis a nivel global.

4 y 5 de Diciembre 2006, previa a la II Cumbre de de la Comunidad Sudamérica de Naciones, hospital cincuenta lideres y lideresas indígenas de nueve países suramericanos discutieron en Cochabamba sobre la integración suramericana. Posteriormente, del 6 a 9 de Diciembre, y en paralelo a la Cumbre presidencial se organizó la Cumbre Social por la Integración de los Pueblos. La Cumbre Social por la Integración de los Pueblos fue un espacio único de participación y dialogo entre actores gubernamentales y de la sociedad civil. Como resultado, 13 sesiones temáticas formularon propuestas para la institucionalidad de la integración suramericana. Una de estas sesiones fue la Sesión de los Pueblos Indígenas y Naciones Originarios, en la cuál los líderes mencionados anteriormente tuvieron un papel protagonista. Muchos de ellos y ellas forman parte de la Coordinadora Andina de Organizaciones Indígenas (CAOI). Estos eventos y posteriores actividades de la sociedad civil Suramericana dirigidas a “Otra Suramérica posible”, y específicamente las acciones referidas a la integración Suramericana que implementó la CAOI entre el inicio de 2007 y mayo 2009, forman la base de este documento. El libro analiza los procesos de la integración Suramericana desde una perspectiva amplia, relacionándoles a los procesos de la integración interamericano, latinoamericano, y regional (por ejemplo Andes, Amazonía, Cono Sur). Asimismo, partiendo de las propuestas de la sociedad civil ya formuladas, particularmente las de CAOI, el libro elabora algunas ideas para una posible institucionalidad suramericana Específicamente, el libro argumenta que la integración suramericana debe tener un carácter propio continental incluyendo los pensamientos andino-amazónicos y respetando los derechos humanos y de la naturaleza. En este sentido, se describen los crecientes impactos sociales y ambientales de la Iniciativa para la Integración de la Infraestructura Regional Sudamericana (IIRSA) y se discuten varios hitos importantes referidos a la integración suramericana: por ejemplo la construcción de la Unión de las Naciones Suramericanas (UNASUR), y la construcción del Banco del Sur. Integración es la construcción de múltiples puentes. Por lo tanto adicionalmente se estudian diferentes corrientes políticas y filosóficas que tienen un papel importante en la construcción de la integración suramericana y las posibilidades de seducir a los sectores que tienen diferentes opiniones, para definir como se puede tener una articulación que óptimamente podrá contribuir a una integración suramericana que de un lado promueva acciones económicas, sociales, culturales y ambientales conjuntas a nivel de América del Sur para el bienestar de su población y su naturaleza y de otro lado promueva un papel protagonista de Suramérica en la confrontación de las crisis a nivel global.


Download Full PDF

4 y 5 de Diciembre 2006, store previa a la II Cumbre de de la Comunidad Sudamérica de Naciones, cincuenta lideres y lideresas indígenas de nueve países suramericanos discutieron en Cochabamba sobre la integración suramericana. Posteriormente, del 6 a 9 de Diciembre, y en paralelo a la Cumbre presidencial se organizó la Cumbre Social por la Integración de los Pueblos. La Cumbre Social por la Integración de los Pueblos fue un espacio único de participación y dialogo entre actores gubernamentales y de la sociedad civil. Como resultado, 13 sesiones temáticas formularon propuestas para la institucionalidad de la integración suramericana. Una de estas sesiones fue la Sesión de los Pueblos Indígenas y Naciones Originarios, en la cuál los líderes mencionados anteriormente tuvieron un papel protagonista. Muchos de ellos y ellas forman parte de la Coordinadora Andina de Organizaciones Indígenas (CAOI). Estos eventos y posteriores actividades de la sociedad civil Suramericana dirigidas a “Otra Suramérica posible”, y específicamente las acciones referidas a la integración Suramericana que implementó la CAOI entre el inicio de 2007 y mayo 2009, forman la base de este documento. El libro analiza los procesos de la integración Suramericana desde una perspectiva amplia, relacionándoles a los procesos de la integración interamericano, latinoamericano, y regional (por ejemplo Andes, Amazonía, Cono Sur). Asimismo, partiendo de las propuestas de la sociedad civil ya formuladas, particularmente las de CAOI, el libro elabora algunas ideas para una posible institucionalidad suramericana Específicamente, el libro argumenta que la integración suramericana debe tener un carácter propio continental incluyendo los pensamientos andino-amazónicos y respetando los derechos humanos y de la naturaleza. En este sentido, se describen los crecientes impactos sociales y ambientales de la Iniciativa para la Integración de la Infraestructura Regional Sudamericana (IIRSA) y se discuten varios hitos importantes referidos a la integración suramericana: por ejemplo la construcción de la Unión de las Naciones Suramericanas (UNASUR), y la construcción del Banco del Sur. Integración es la construcción de múltiples puentes. Por lo tanto adicionalmente se estudian diferentes corrientes políticas y filosóficas que tienen un papel importante en la construcción de la integración suramericana y las posibilidades de seducir a los sectores que tienen diferentes opiniones, para definir como se puede tener una articulación que óptimamente podrá contribuir a una integración suramericana que de un lado promueva acciones económicas, sociales, culturales y ambientales conjuntas a nivel de América del Sur para el bienestar de su población y su naturaleza y de otro lado promueva un papel protagonista de Suramérica en la confrontación de las crisis a nivel global.


Download Full PDF

Cochabamba, find 15 al 17 de 2009
Hacia la fundación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del “ALBA – TCP”


Durante muchos años nuestros pueblos y naciones originarias fueron saqueados permanentemente y reducidos a simples colonias por los países más poderosos del mundo, sildenafil quienes en su afán de acumulación de riqueza invadieron nuestros territorios, se adueñaron de nuestras riquezas, culturas, conciencias, enajenando nuestro trabajo y ofendiendo a nuestra madre tierra (pachamama) depredando los recursos que existe en ella en pos de lucro desmedido.
En los 80 una inmensa deuda externa imposible de pagar nos postró aun más en la pobreza y la miseria, volviendo a generarse la violencia institucional que ya se había vivido con la militarización de nuestros pueblos, la desaparición y la tortura de nuestros familiares y el sometimiento de nuestras naciones indígenas originarias campesinas.
A lo anterior, ya en la etapa neoliberal, se añaden en el marco del capitalismo transnacional y globalizado los inhumanos procesos de desnacionalización y la sumisión absoluta de los gobiernos neoliberales a los dictados del Fondo Monetario Internacional y del Banco Mundial.
Todo esto ha hecho que la voluntad popular no signifique nada en el esquema del pensamiento de las transnacionales, de la explotación y el crimen, recordándonos permanentemente que la era de colonización de nuestros pueblos aún no ha terminado.
La intromisión del imperialismo yanqui en la historia de nuestros pueblos como ocurrió con países como Colombia, Haití, México, Puerto Rico, Nicaragua, Argentina, Ecuador, Venezuela, Bolivia, entre otros, con el pretexto de luchar contra el “terrorismo” o el “narcotráfico” ha expoliado nuestros recursos y ha empobrecido a nuestra gente; igual que los colonizadores de la “cruz y la espada” se ha apoderado de nuestras riquezas y ha dañado el medio ambiente.
La desigualdad económica, política y social, al igual que la exclusión y la discriminación son producto del neoliberalismo y el colonialismo de larga data, que debilitaron a los Estados y supeditaron el bienestar de nuestros pueblos a los designios de las organizaciones multinacionales y a los intereses de las empresas trasnacionales. La capacidad destructiva del sistema de dominación imperialista es aterradora, el desempleo aumenta y la esperanza de vida desciende; ellos mismos se encuentran ahora sumidos en una crisis sistémica cuya resolución no puede ser a costa del bienestar de nuestros pueblos.
Los movimientos sociales, expresión de las organizaciones indígenas originarias, afro descendientes, campesinas, organizaciones sindicales, juveniles, gremiales, los maestros, los obreros, los sin tierra, los productores cocaleros, las juntas de vecinos, profesionales progresistas y otros que luchan no solo por reivindicaciones salariales, sino también por la vida y el respeto a la madre tierra, desde antes, y desde siempre fueron los verdaderos artífices de la revolución y de las transformaciones profundas.
No olvidemos que los movimientos sociales hemos jugado un papel central en los últimos años en la perspectiva de una democratización y descolonización profunda de nuestros países, por un cambio sustantivo y genuinamente transformador tanto en lo económico, como en lo superestructural de nuestra Abya Yala.
Recordemos que el 14 de diciembre de 2004, Cuba y Venezuela proponen dar inicio e impulsar el ALBA, como alternativa al ALCA, que permita a nuestros pueblos y naciones avanzar políticamente en la búsqueda de una verdadera y libre integración, basada en la solidaridad, que responda a las necesidades sociales, políticas, educativas, culturales, económicas, reconociendo las luchas históricas de los pueblos latinoamericanos y caribeños por su unidad y soberanía.
En noviembre de 2005, en el marco de la Cumbre de las Américas en Mar del Plata, se da la simbólica derrota del ALCA que fue organizada por la Alianza Social Continental, como aporte a la integración.
Meses después en enero de 2006, en el marco del capítulo del Foro Social Mundial, el Presidente Chávez se reúne con Movimientos Sociales y plantea la necesidad de la creación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del Alba.
El año 2006, en Lima Perú se lleva a cabo la Cumbre Enlazando Alternativas, paralela a la Cumbre de Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de América Latina y la Unión Europea, en la que se avanza en la articulación de los Movimientos Sociales en el marco del proceso de integración latinoamericana.
Más tarde en noviembre del 2006, en la ciudad de Cochabamba, Bolivia, se celebra la Cumbre Social por la integración de los Pueblos, paralela a la Cumbre Presidencial de la Comunidad Suramericana de Naciones (CSN). Fue organizada por la Alianza Social Continental, como aporte a la integración en el marco de una gran movilización de los movimientos sociales, originarios y originarios del país.
En la V Cumbre del ALBA celebrada en abril de 2007 se lanza la declaración de Tintorero donde se aprueba la creación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA.
Después en noviembre de 2007, en la II Reunión de la Comisión Política del ALBA, el Consejo de Ministros decide que cada país miembro debe crear su capítulo nacional en el marco de la conformación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA, y que los integrantes de dicho capítulo acordaran la forma y metodología para el funcionamiento de dicho Consejo, así como la invitación a otros movimientos sociales de países extra-ALBA a participar en el mismo.
En ese mismo año, se expande la Alternativa Bolivariana a partir de la formación de las casas del ALBA a países no integrados al ALBA con la participación de las organizaciones sociales de esos países, entre ellos en Perú.
Posteriormente en enero del año 2008, en Caracas se celebra la VI Cumbre del ALBA, donde se aprueba la estrategia para el Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA, incluyendo sus principios, estructura y funciones, además se acuerda darle continuidad a dos acciones pendientes aprobadas en Tintorero, que son:
– Identificar en el ámbito Latinoamericano y caribeño, organizaciones, redes y campañas sub-regionales y regionales, nacionales y locales, en países extra-ALBA que puedan ser convocadas para formar parte del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales”.
– Realizar reunión constitutiva del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales”.
El complejo proceso de organización de la institucionalidad del ALBA-TCP como mecanismo de integración, las realidades y desafíos que han vivido algunos de los procesos políticos de los países miembros (Bolivia, Venezuela), otras prioridades y esfuerzos dentro del ALBA-TCP y criterios de países miembros han determinado que esta iniciativa esté pospuesta desde esa fecha (Aún en febrero de este año, 2009, la Comisión Política acordó “establecer un plazo a la creación de los capítulos nacionales de movimientos sociales y comunicar a la coordinación permanente del ALBA los detalles al respecto antes de finales de abril de 2009. Ello con el fin de promover la instalación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA el primero de mayo de 2009”).
Y es en este contexto que en julio de 2008 el MST y las organizaciones de la Vía Campesina Brasil, en diálogo con otras organizaciones del continente, convocan a sendos encuentros en la Escuela Nacional Florestán Fernández (MST) con un grupo sustantivo de líderes y operadores políticos de movimientos y organizaciones sociales, para, con todos estos antecedentes, llamar a un proceso de construcción de una articulación hemisférica de movimientos y organizaciones sociales en torno a los principios del ALBA y sus iniciativas. Resultado de esta reunión es la Carta de los Movimientos Sociales de las Américas que fue lanzada en la Asamblea de Movimientos Sociales, en ocasión del III Foro Social de las Américas (Guatemala, octubre 2008).
En enero de 2009, como parte de las actividades del VIII FSM 2009, celebrado en Belem de Pará, Brasil, se reunieron en la Asamblea de Movimientos Sociales, representantes de centenares de organizaciones y movimientos de todos los países de las Américas, que se identifican con el proceso de construcción del ALBA, para aprobar esta carta en su versión definitiva: Carta de los Movimientos Sociales de las Américas. Construyendo la integración de los pueblos desde abajo. Impulsando el ALBA y la solidaridad de los pueblos, frente al proyecto del imperialismo.
Recientemente en septiembre de este año, en Sao Paulo se realiza una Convocatoria a los Movimientos Sociales de Las Américas con el objetivo de articular el proceso de construcción del ALBA a partir de los Movimientos Sociales.
Con este recuento no solo reflejamos el camino recorrido en este proceso de integración hasta la fecha, sino que los alentamos a reflexionar y construir desde nuestra historia común.
En efecto lo que estamos viviendo en América Latina es parte de un proceso abarcador de reapropiación social de nuestro destino, de nuevas formas de organización política, horizontal, de democracia directa y participativa, de una economía plural que recupere los recursos naturales en beneficio de los pueblos, de una construcción de nuevas relaciones sociales armónicas, solidarias y comunitarias de producción.
Ahora con una fuerza inusitada surge en América y el mundo el grito de libertad, de lucha por la recuperación de nuestro territorio, de nuestras libertades, de nuestra soberanía; miles de hermanos se sumaron a la causa revolucionaria para liberar la patria, miles de ellos ofrendaron sus vidas en este intento, en diferentes épocas y de diferentes maneras, mártires de la revolución fueron los Tupac Katari, Tupac Amaru, Bartolina Sisa, Manuela Saenz, Apiaguayki Tumpa, Juana Azurduy de Padilla, Santos Pariamo, Marcelo Quiroga Santa Cruz, Inti Peredo, Lempira el héroe de la revolución hondureña, el libertador Simón Bolívar, Augusto Cesar Sandino, José Martí, Ernesto Che Guevara, Salvador Allende. Luis Espinal y actualmente los cinco patriotas cubanos que purgan condenas perpetúas por el solo hecho de luchar contra el terrorismo, contra el imperialismo.
Esta Primera Cumbre del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales en el marco del ALBA-TCP, es una Cumbre histórica que permite la participación directa de los movimientos sociales en los diferentes medios de cooperación y solidaridad, a diferencia de otros mecanismos de integración de países, que nunca han considerado la participación plena de los pueblos y naciones, limitándose a meros intercambios de intereses mercantilistas que van en contra de la integración y reciprocidad de pueblos y naciones de la gran Abya Yala (latinoamericana).
En este contexto la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América y el Caribe, se constituye en un verdadero espacio de construcción de una nueva patria latinoamericana, portando la bandera de la humanidad por su definitiva emancipación. Por eso estamos dispuestos a combatir contra la explotación del hombre por el hombre, considerando que existe la latente necesidad de una “segunda independencia”.
Ésta Cumbre Internacional, es el saludo de los Movimientos Sociales de los países miembros del ALBA-TCP, a la VII Cumbre de Presidentes de la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América – Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos, que durante media década lucha por la desaparición de toda forma de dominación y explotación contra los pueblos y la construcción de relaciones de complementariedad y ayuda recíproca en procura de su desarrollo y de lograr el buen vivir.
Aquí, desde el corazón de Sudamérica, desde los pueblos combatientes, las organizaciones indígenas originarios campesinas, obreros, trabajadores, estudiantes, clase media y profesionales comprometidos con su pueblo de Venezuela, Cuba, Bolivia, Antigua y Barbuda, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Honduras, la Mancomunidad de Domínica, San Vicente y las Granadinas, aunados en el Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP, nos comprometemos a defender los principios revolucionarios del ALBA-TCP, que potencian la lucha y la resistencia contra todo tipo de explotación para construir un mundo diferente.
Nuestro objetivo como Consejo de Movimientos Sociales de los países miembros del ALBA-TCP, es la lucha por el pluralismo en nuestros países y en el mundo entero, sustentada en la armonía entre nuestros pueblos y la madre tierra para el buen vivir, en los principios morales, éticos, políticos y económicos de nuestras comunidades y barrios del campo y la ciudad. Pretendemos forjar desde el seno del pueblo una nueva Patria Social Comunitaria, descolonizada y fundada en la multidiversidad, respetuosa de las diferencias y de las particularidades sociales y regionales.
La actuación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales, estará fundamentada en los siguientes principios:
– Es un espacio inclusivo, abierto, diverso y plural, a partir de la identificación con los objetivos y principios del ALBA-TCP.
– Es un espacio para compartir y desarrollar agendas comunes que beneficien a los pueblos, sin convertirnos en un espacio para dirimir disputas y representaciones políticas.
– Es un espacio para fortalecer posiciones políticas económicas y sociales, sin convertirnos en un foro o asamblea de actuación social, que reconoce los espacios de articulación existentes.
– Significa el compromiso de la plena identificación con los principios generales que definen el ALBA-TCP como proceso de integración.
– Expresa la legitimidad y representación real de los Movimientos Sociales que se integran.
– En países miembros, sostener permanente diálogo e interrelación con sus respectivos gobiernos.
– Cada Coordinación Nacional en los países miembros del ALBA-TCP, definirá sus propias dinámicas de actuación y de relacionamiento con sus gobiernos.
– En países miembros del ALBA-TCP, los vínculos de las organizaciones sociales con el CMS, se desarrollará a través de las Coordinaciones Nacionales.
– Integrar el enfoque de género, reconociendo el legítimo derecho de la participación de la mujer en los movimientos sociales con equidad, igualdad real y justicia social.
Los pueblos de América Latina que pertenecemos a la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América Latina y el Caribe – Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos, organizados en este Consejo, continuaremos luchando contra los constantes intentos del imperialismo norteamericano de privarnos del desarrollo económico pleno; ni los ataques, amedrentamientos, armas, utilización de la violencia podrán callarnos, seguiremos luchando y siendo solidarios ahora particularmente con el pueblo hermano de Honduras.
Estamos convencidos de que sólo con la organización, movilización y la unidad de los pueblos del ALBA-TCP, es posible un auténtico proceso de integración, como también el logro de la transformación económica, social, política y cultural de nuestros países.
Esta Cumbre reafirma la voluntad de Bolivia, Venezuela, Cuba, Antigua y Barbuda, San Vicente y las Granadinas, Nicaragua, Honduras, Ecuador y la Mancomunidad de Dominica por el desarrollo y el fortalecimiento del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales sobre la base de una solidaridad comprometida con los demás pueblos del continente; optamos por la lucha plural, democrática, antifascista y antiimperialista, a través de un trabajo con objetivos políticos que no escondan su naturaleza ni su carácter revolucionario.
La conformación de este Consejo de Movimientos Sociales nos permite salir de las luchas locales y aisladas, de nuestras fronteras nacionales para integrarnos en la dimensión del AbyaYala o patria latinoamericana, permite la complementariedad y participación de los pueblos en los diferentes Consejos y Grupos de Trabajo que son las instancias de unificación que funcionan en el marco de la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América Latina y el Caribe.
Para lo cual se conforma un comité ad hoc, que coordinara Bolivia, y será integrado por un representante de los tres capítulos nacionales ya creados (Bolivia, Venezuela y Cuba) y otras importantes organizaciones, redes y campañas para impulsar el proceso de constitución del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP en seis meses.
Es dado en la ciudad de Cochabamba, a los 16 días del mes octubre de 2009.
______________________________
PROPUESTA DE ACCION
– Consolidación de los capítulos nacionales con organizaciones representativas de los movimientos sociales.
– Incorporar a los movimientos sociales de los países del ALBA en el Exterior. Así como organizaciones sociales presentes en los países Miembros del ALBA.
– Crear espacios de discusión para evaluar actividades de los movimientos sociales y desarrollar programas comunes.
– Que los movimientos sociales realicen actividades de solidaridad de manera conjunta.
– Saludamos las iniciativas de Vía Campesina, MST y otras organizaciones, propuestas en septiembre de 2009 en Sao Paulo, en la perspectiva de fortalecer la articulación de los movimientos sociales del continente. En específico, nos sumamos a la iniciativa de la realización de una Asamblea Continental de Movimientos Sociales con el ALBA, para el primer semestre del 2010.
– Fortalecer los programas de desarrollo, participación y asistencia a través de los movimientos sociales.
– Asignación presupuestaria a los movimientos sociales
– Privilegiar el proceso de participación de la mujer en la dirección de los movimientos sociales.
– Incorporación de manera progresiva a organizaciones comunitarias pequeñas con igualdad de derecho de participación.
– Luchar por los derechos de los inmigrantes a un trabajo digno y a la salud.
– Impulsar la participación de los movimientos sociales de los países cuyos gobiernos no son integrantes formales del ALBA como forma de globalizar la lucha.
– Los programas de los movimientos sociales deben ser entregados a los Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de los Países del ALBA a través de resoluciones para su aprobación.
– Los “10 mandamientos para salvar la vida y el planeta, la humanidad y la vida” propuesto por el Presidente Evo Morales deben ser adoptados como principios fundamentales de los movimientos sociales.
– Cada capítulo nacional debe establecer sus programas que respondan a las necesidades reales de los pueblos.
– Establecer mecanismos de comunicación permanente entre los movimientos sociales y los pueblos y naciones indígenas originarias campesinas, donde se compartan las experiencias del proceso en cada país.
– Desarrollar programas de formación para los voceros de los movimientos sociales.
– Crear una red de medios de comunicación e información propios de los movimientos sociales.
– Luchar y demandar el derecho de los pueblos a la paz y a su autodeterminación.
– Invitar a las Nacionalidades y pueblos indígenas; a las comunidades del campo y de la ciudad; a las organizaciones populares; a los medios y redes de comunicación comunitaria y masiva; a todos y todas los habitantes del mundo, a difundir, denunciar y condenar en sus espacios; las estrategias de intervención de los Estados Unidos, a través de bases militares en Colombia, en la región, y el resto del mundo.
– Impulsar campañas en contra de las empresas transnacionales e impulsar proyectos gran nacionales promovidos por los gobiernos del ALBA A TRAVES DEL TRATADO DE COMERCIO DE LOS PUEBLOS.
– Apoyar la adopción de una moneda internacional, promovidos por los países del ALBA y la UNASUR.
– Estimular las luchas sociales para el re-ascenso del movimiento de masas.
Para lo cual se conforma un comité ad hoc, que coordinara Bolivia, y será integrado por un representante de los tres capítulos nacionales ya creados (Bolivia, Venezuela y Cuba) y otras importantes organizaciones, redes y campañas para impulsar el proceso de constitución del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP en seis meses

Public Forum Global Crises: Regional alternatives Perspectives from Asia, Latin America and Europe

The events of People’s SAARC in Kathmandu were organized from 23 to 25 March 2007 with an objective of strengthening the people’s solidarity in South Asia in tune with the vision and perspectives of an alternative model for political, social, economic, and cultural order that must ensure democracy, justice and peace for all in the region. Moreover, it aimed to strengthen people-to-people relationships in the region that would inaugurate a climate to revive the balance and harmony among the people. It should liquidate artificial and inhuman barriers that divide lands, people and minds, transcending all the boundaries.


Proceedings of People's SAARC cover sheet

Download PDF

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } A:link { color: #0000ff } –>

Jenina Joy Chavez / Focus on the Global South

 

(Presentation at the Conference on “Regional Integration: an Opportunity Presented by the Crisis”, Asuncion, for sale Paraguay, site July 21-22, 2009.)

 

 

What I will tackle this evening is an updated version of the notes I used for the Regional Integration: Opportunities to Face the Crisis conference in Asuncion, Paraguay, and the Philippine WS on ASEAN, earlier this year. There is no claim that regional responses are the only viable responses to the global crisis, but hopefully we would be able to determine if it is appropriate to study and consider them as part of the many options on alternates we can try.

 

Before the crisis, it has been projected that in about a decade, the South –that is, the developing countries – would account for more than half of the world income and more than 50% of global trade. It has been trumpeted all over that Asia together with other emerging economies would be the major growth drivers in the world economy, highlighting the relevance of South-South cooperation, particularly regional economic integration in Asia.

 

For Asia, at least, this claim has been put to the test with the onset of the global financial crisis that put into the spotlight the basic development paradigm deployed by what is considered the world over as prosperous Asia.

 

 

In terms of what has happened in the last year and a half, following are some observations on how Asia tried to respond to the crisis:

 

  • First, unlike what characterized how the North (particularly Western Europe and North America) responded to the crisis, Asia’s response does not include massive bailout packages to failing corporations, particularly ailing financial entities.

 

    • This highlights the differential manifestations of the crisis. While financialization is a global phenomenon, sparing no one and certainly not Asia, Asia still hosts one of the most robust productive capacity worldwide – that is, the real economy remains the most significant feature of Asia’s growth and development.

 

  • Second, in most countries, though, the immediate response was to address the liquidity crunch and the crisis of confidence, especially in the banking system. This included moves to increase deposit insurance coverage, and guarantees on deposit-taking institutions. As a result, massive bank runs have been avoided.

 

  • Third, from the initial liquidity crunch, economic slowdown became the norm. Hence, governments moved to address this by increasing liquidity and easing credit and monetary policy, including intervening in foreign exchange markets. Many state enterprises also increased their shareholdings in publicly-traded companies. The result – relative low interest rates.

 

  • Fourth, stimulus packages have at their center fiscal policy and public spending, although social sector spending has not received much attention.

 

    • Asian countries have devoted between less than ½ percent of GDP to their fiscal stimulus package to more than 9%.

    • Among the biggest packages are those of the following:

      • Singapore, $15B (6%)

      • Malaysia, $2B initially to $16B (9% of GDP)

      • China, $600B spread only over 2 years

    • Most of the stimulus packages have a central tax break or tax credit component, as well as capital spending, including re-capitalization of state-run banks, most notably in India.

 

  • Fifth, the Asian response has been centered around resiliency. That is, they are focused on minimizing unemployment and on creating employment opportunities

 

    • With programs like job credits or payouts to employers of up to 12% of salaries (Singapore)

    • Various skills upgrading and retraining programs

    • Welfare support to retrenched workers and returning overseas workers.

    • Such resiliency packages, though, highlighted some tensions inherent in the increasingly connected Asian economies and job markets.

      • For instance, part of Malaysia’s and Singapore’s response is to cut down or crackdown on migrant workers, a classic response to appease worker’s restiveness at home, and a blatant disregard to the ripple such moves might effect.

 

  • Sixth, at least the ASEAN+3 is trying to improve on a regional financial cooperation first introduced in 2000 as a response to the 97/98 Asian financial crisis.

    • The Chiang Mai Initiative is a collaboration to create a network of bilateral swap arrangements to manage short-term liquidity problems.

    • From $20B in 2000, it increased to $80B in 2008, and earlier this year was increased further to $120B.

    • Moreover, the swaps are being multilateralized, a step towards developing from a bilateral into a regional pool.

    • This is about the only such regional initiative in Asia. There is no equivalent for South Asia, or in West and Central Asia.

 

 

From these observations, several key questions emerge:

 

  • 1st: would Asia be able to export its way out of the crisis? Is it even proper to aim only for this?

 

  • 2nd:: would the regional integration vaunted to be necessary to solidify and further the growth in Asia be resorted to, or given life in practice, in the wake of this crisis?

 

  • 3rd: in the design of crisis response, what is Asia aiming for?

    • Is it just to recover previous levels of consumption and economic activity?

    • How much of the response is for immediate relief, extremely necessary at this time?

    • And how much of this response is for the long-term and tries to take advantage of converting the crisis into opportunity?

 

 

At this point, I would like to emphasize three points that interrogate what Asia has managed or not managed to do:

 

  • One, note that the responses now differ qualitatively from the responses Asia had a decade ago.

 

    • There is no IMF, not least because the IMF has gained notoriety and lost a lot of credibility because of how it bungled its job in the late 1990s.

    • Not only is there no IMF, the policy and programmatic responses of Asia have been antithesis to what the IMF formerly prescribed.

      • There was no interest cure that killed business; instead efforts were concentrated on preserving relative low interest rates (including intervention in the forex market).

      • There were many elements of direct transfers, subsidies, and re-capitalization; something the IMF would never do (at least before).

    • In short, the responses are not patently neoliberal.

 

  • Two, these responses have not warranted enough incentive towards a focus on internal demand, on the one hand, and on coordinated expanded demand regionally, on the other.

 

    • More pointedly, it is a concern that Asia should even set as its main objective the recovery and maintenance of consumption levels prior to the crisis.

    • We should not be overly concerned about trying to save what has been clearly a cause of failure. It is high time for Asia to draw from regional resources and invent something that will again set it apart – or, place it in cooperation with other regions trying to imagine things differently.

 

  • Three, there is concern that ASEAN+3 finds it difficult to make good on regional financial cooperation as designed through the Chiang Mai Initiative and related processes.

 

    • Take for instance, when South Korea got hit when the Lehman Brothers collapsed, it negotiated a $30B foreign exchange swap with the US Federal Reserve and not the ASEAN+3. (They came later.)

    • Despite increases in commitments, the CMI is still not functional, and the IMF still plays a role when countries tap the CMI for more than 20% of their requirement, detracting from the importance of financial as well policy autonomy for Asia.

 

 

There are certainly elements of response – some quite innovative or at least properly targeted – in Asia. The question is whether Asia is able to turn the crisis on its head, and be able to emerge with another unique contribution to development discourse as it has been known to have done in the past.

 

Moreover, we as civil society and social movements, in our interrogation of possible alternatives, esp. if we have little or no hold on power – the question of how to get that power either by holding political power ourselves or rallying massive constituencies on our side – is key.

 

The final set of points I wish to make has to do with the areas where regional response would be crucial:

 

  • One, the need to focus on internal demand and a more coordinated rationalization of regional demand.

 

    • There is need to re-imagine trade and production cooperation, where instead of competition, the prevailing principles would be cooperation, complementation and solidarity.

    • Such arrangement must address the issue of excess, and should have as outer limit some climate and ecological threshold.

 

  • Two, there is need to overhaul the financial architecture for Asia

 

    • Away from dependence on Northern currencies, esp. the American $

    • And towards the pooling of alternative sources of development finance

    • As well as appropriate surveillance and monitoring systems (without the IMF) that assist countries and build confidence that every one takes responsibility for regional financial stability

 

  • Three, there is need to strengthen regional stockpiling for food security

 

    • South Asia has better experience on this although technically Southeast Asia pledges bigger reserves

    • Away from trade logic and towards regional self-help and development of crisis response capabilities.

 

  • Four, there is need to re-imagine the public

 

    • It is time to talk about the public not only in the narrow confines of the State or the government, but also support different forms of provisioning that allowed communities to survive at a time that the State was neglecting them.

    • It must be recognized that such strength can be scaled up at the national and the regional level.

 

  • Five, whatever alternative we think of, resonance with the people is important.

 

    • We need to start where there is clear demand, and patent need, to make regional arrangements acceptable to the people

      • Migration

      • Rights and democracy

      • Decent living standards and environment

      • Ability to generate economic activity and distribute its fruits equitably

    • There is need to also work on something that works and shows results in the immediate even as the strategic alternative structures are still being constructed.

Jenina Joy Chavez / Focus on the Global South

 

(Presentation at the Conference on “Regional Integration: an Opportunity Presented by the Crisis”, diagnosis Asuncion, Paraguay, July 21-22, 2009.)

 

What I will tackle this evening is an updated version of the notes I used for the Regional Integration: Opportunities to Face the Crisis conference in Asuncion, Paraguay, and the Philippine WS on ASEAN, earlier this year. There is no claim that regional responses are the only viable responses to the global crisis, but hopefully we would be able to determine if it is appropriate to study and consider them as part of the many options on alternates we can try.

Before the crisis, it has been projected that in about a decade, the South –that is, the developing countries – would account for more than half of the world income and more than 50% of global trade. It has been trumpeted all over that Asia together with other emerging economies would be the major growth drivers in the world economy, highlighting the relevance of South-South cooperation, particularly regional economic integration in Asia.

For Asia, at least, this claim has been put to the test with the onset of the global financial crisis that put into the spotlight the basic development paradigm deployed by what is considered the world over as prosperous Asia.

In terms of what has happened in the last year and a half, following are some observations on how Asia tried to respond to the crisis:

First, unlike what characterized how the North (particularly Western Europe and North America) responded to the crisis, Asia’s response does not include massive bailout packages to failing corporations, particularly ailing financial entities.

This highlights the differential manifestations of the crisis. While financialization is a global phenomenon, sparing no one and certainly not Asia, Asia still hosts one of the most robust productive capacity worldwide – that is, the real economy remains the most significant feature of Asia’s growth and development.

Second, in most countries, though, the immediate response was to address the liquidity crunch and the crisis of confidence, especially in the banking system. This included moves to increase deposit insurance coverage, and guarantees on deposit-taking institutions. As a result, massive bank runs have been avoided.

Third, from the initial liquidity crunch, economic slowdown became the norm. Hence, governments moved to address this by increasing liquidity and easing credit and monetary policy, including intervening in foreign exchange markets. Many state enterprises also increased their shareholdings in publicly-traded companies. The result – relative low interest rates.

Fourth, stimulus packages have at their center fiscal policy and public spending, although social sector spending has not received much attention.

Asian countries have devoted between less than ½ percent of GDP to their fiscal stimulus package to more than 9%.

Among the biggest packages are those of the following:

      • Singapore, $15B (6%)
      • Malaysia, $2B initially to $16B (9% of GDP)
      • China, $600B spread only over 2 years

Most of the stimulus packages have a central tax break or tax credit component, as well as capital spending, including re-capitalization of state-run banks, most notably in India.

Fifth, the Asian response has been centered around resiliency. That is, they are focused on minimizing unemployment and on creating employment opportunities

With programs like job credits or payouts to employers of up to 12% of salaries (Singapore)

Various skills upgrading and retraining programs

Welfare support to retrenched workers and returning overseas workers.

Such resiliency packages, though, highlighted some tensions inherent in the increasingly connected Asian economies and job markets.

      • For instance, part of Malaysia’s and Singapore’s response is to cut down or crackdown on migrant workers, a classic response to appease worker’s restiveness at home, and a blatant disregard to the ripple such moves might effect.

Sixth, at least the ASEAN+3 is trying to improve on a regional financial cooperation first introduced in 2000 as a response to the 97/98 Asian financial crisis.

The Chiang Mai Initiative is a collaboration to create a network of bilateral swap arrangements to manage short-term liquidity problems.

From $20B in 2000, it increased to $80B in 2008, and earlier this year was increased further to $120B.

Moreover, the swaps are being multilateralized, a step towards developing from a bilateral into a regional pool.

This is about the only such regional initiative in Asia. There is no equivalent for South Asia, or in West and Central Asia.

From these observations, several key questions emerge:

1st: would Asia be able to export its way out of the crisis? Is it even proper to aim only for this?

2nd:: would the regional integration vaunted to be necessary to solidify and further the growth in Asia be resorted to, or given life in practice, in the wake of this crisis?

3rd: in the design of crisis response, what is Asia aiming for?

Is it just to recover previous levels of consumption and economic activity?

How much of the response is for immediate relief, extremely necessary at this time?

And how much of this response is for the long-term and tries to take advantage of converting the crisis into opportunity?

At this point, I would like to emphasize three points that interrogate what Asia has managed or not managed to do:

One, note that the responses now differ qualitatively from the responses Asia had a decade ago.

There is no IMF, not least because the IMF has gained notoriety and lost a lot of credibility because of how it bungled its job in the late 1990s.

Not only is there no IMF, the policy and programmatic responses of Asia have been antithesis to what the IMF formerly prescribed.

      • There was no interest cure that killed business; instead efforts were concentrated on preserving relative low interest rates (including intervention in the forex market).
      • There were many elements of direct transfers, subsidies, and re-capitalization; something the IMF would never do (at least before).

In short, the responses are not patently neoliberal.

Two, these responses have not warranted enough incentive towards a focus on internal demand, on the one hand, and on coordinated expanded demand regionally, on the other.

More pointedly, it is a concern that Asia should even set as its main objective the recovery and maintenance of consumption levels prior to the crisis.

We should not be overly concerned about trying to save what has been clearly a cause of failure. It is high time for Asia to draw from regional resources and invent something that will again set it apart – or, place it in cooperation with other regions trying to imagine things differently.

Three, there is concern that ASEAN+3 finds it difficult to make good on regional financial cooperation as designed through the Chiang Mai Initiative and related processes.

Take for instance, when South Korea got hit when the Lehman Brothers collapsed, it negotiated a $30B foreign exchange swap with the US Federal Reserve and not the ASEAN+3. (They came later.)

Despite increases in commitments, the CMI is still not functional, and the IMF still plays a role when countries tap the CMI for more than 20% of their requirement, detracting from the importance of financial as well policy autonomy for Asia.

There are certainly elements of response – some quite innovative or at least properly targeted – in Asia. The question is whether Asia is able to turn the crisis on its head, and be able to emerge with another unique contribution to development discourse as it has been known to have done in the past.

Moreover, we as civil society and social movements, in our interrogation of possible alternatives, esp. if we have little or no hold on power – the question of how to get that power either by holding political power ourselves or rallying massive constituencies on our side – is key.

The final set of points I wish to make has to do with the areas where regional response would be crucial:

One, the need to focus on internal demand and a more coordinated rationalization of regional demand.

There is need to re-imagine trade and production cooperation, where instead of competition, the prevailing principles would be cooperation, complementation and solidarity.

Such arrangement must address the issue of excess, and should have as outer limit some climate and ecological threshold.

Two, there is need to overhaul the financial architecture for Asia

Away from dependence on Northern currencies, esp. the American $

And towards the pooling of alternative sources of development finance

As well as appropriate surveillance and monitoring systems (without the IMF) that assist countries and build confidence that every one takes responsibility for regional financial stability

Three, there is need to strengthen regional stockpiling for food security

South Asia has better experience on this although technically Southeast Asia pledges bigger reserves

Away from trade logic and towards regional self-help and development of crisis response capabilities.

Four, there is need to re-imagine the public

It is time to talk about the public not only in the narrow confines of the State or the government, but also support different forms of provisioning that allowed communities to survive at a time that the State was neglecting them.

It must be recognized that such strength can be scaled up at the national and the regional level.

Five, whatever alternative we think of, resonance with the people is important.

We need to start where there is clear demand, and patent need, to make regional arrangements acceptable to the people

      • Migration
      • Rights and democracy
      • Decent living standards and environment
      • Ability to generate economic activity and distribute its fruits equitably

There is need to also work on something that works and shows results in the immediate even as the strategic alternative structures are still being constructed.


<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } A:link { color: #0000ff } –>

Jenina Joy Chavez / Focus on the Global South

 

(Presentation at the Conference on “Regional Integration: an Opportunity Presented by the Crisis”, online Asuncion, Paraguay, July 21-22, 2009.)

 

 

What I will tackle this evening is an updated version of the notes I used for the Regional Integration: Opportunities to Face the Crisis conference in Asuncion, Paraguay, and the Philippine WS on ASEAN, earlier this year. There is no claim that regional responses are the only viable responses to the global crisis, but hopefully we would be able to determine if it is appropriate to study and consider them as part of the many options on alternates we can try.

 

Before the crisis, it has been projected that in about a decade, the South –that is, the developing countries – would account for more than half of the world income and more than 50% of global trade. It has been trumpeted all over that Asia together with other emerging economies would be the major growth drivers in the world economy, highlighting the relevance of South-South cooperation, particularly regional economic integration in Asia.

 

For Asia, at least, this claim has been put to the test with the onset of the global financial crisis that put into the spotlight the basic development paradigm deployed by what is considered the world over as prosperous Asia.

 

 

In terms of what has happened in the last year and a half, following are some observations on how Asia tried to respond to the crisis:

 

  • First, unlike what characterized how the North (particularly Western Europe and North America) responded to the crisis, Asia’s response does not include massive bailout packages to failing corporations, particularly ailing financial entities.

 

    • This highlights the differential manifestations of the crisis. While financialization is a global phenomenon, sparing no one and certainly not Asia, Asia still hosts one of the most robust productive capacity worldwide – that is, the real economy remains the most significant feature of Asia’s growth and development.

 

  • Second, in most countries, though, the immediate response was to address the liquidity crunch and the crisis of confidence, especially in the banking system. This included moves to increase deposit insurance coverage, and guarantees on deposit-taking institutions. As a result, massive bank runs have been avoided.

 

  • Third, from the initial liquidity crunch, economic slowdown became the norm. Hence, governments moved to address this by increasing liquidity and easing credit and monetary policy, including intervening in foreign exchange markets. Many state enterprises also increased their shareholdings in publicly-traded companies. The result – relative low interest rates.

 

  • Fourth, stimulus packages have at their center fiscal policy and public spending, although social sector spending has not received much attention.

 

    • Asian countries have devoted between less than ½ percent of GDP to their fiscal stimulus package to more than 9%.

    • Among the biggest packages are those of the following:

      • Singapore, $15B (6%)

      • Malaysia, $2B initially to $16B (9% of GDP)

      • China, $600B spread only over 2 years

    • Most of the stimulus packages have a central tax break or tax credit component, as well as capital spending, including re-capitalization of state-run banks, most notably in India.

 

  • Fifth, the Asian response has been centered around resiliency. That is, they are focused on minimizing unemployment and on creating employment opportunities

 

    • With programs like job credits or payouts to employers of up to 12% of salaries (Singapore)

    • Various skills upgrading and retraining programs

    • Welfare support to retrenched workers and returning overseas workers.

    • Such resiliency packages, though, highlighted some tensions inherent in the increasingly connected Asian economies and job markets.

      • For instance, part of Malaysia’s and Singapore’s response is to cut down or crackdown on migrant workers, a classic response to appease worker’s restiveness at home, and a blatant disregard to the ripple such moves might effect.

 

  • Sixth, at least the ASEAN+3 is trying to improve on a regional financial cooperation first introduced in 2000 as a response to the 97/98 Asian financial crisis.

    • The Chiang Mai Initiative is a collaboration to create a network of bilateral swap arrangements to manage short-term liquidity problems.

    • From $20B in 2000, it increased to $80B in 2008, and earlier this year was increased further to $120B.

    • Moreover, the swaps are being multilateralized, a step towards developing from a bilateral into a regional pool.

    • This is about the only such regional initiative in Asia. There is no equivalent for South Asia, or in West and Central Asia.

 

 

From these observations, several key questions emerge:

 

  • 1st: would Asia be able to export its way out of the crisis? Is it even proper to aim only for this?

 

  • 2nd:: would the regional integration vaunted to be necessary to solidify and further the growth in Asia be resorted to, or given life in practice, in the wake of this crisis?

 

  • 3rd: in the design of crisis response, what is Asia aiming for?

    • Is it just to recover previous levels of consumption and economic activity?

    • How much of the response is for immediate relief, extremely necessary at this time?

    • And how much of this response is for the long-term and tries to take advantage of converting the crisis into opportunity?

 

 

At this point, I would like to emphasize three points that interrogate what Asia has managed or not managed to do:

 

  • One, note that the responses now differ qualitatively from the responses Asia had a decade ago.

 

    • There is no IMF, not least because the IMF has gained notoriety and lost a lot of credibility because of how it bungled its job in the late 1990s.

    • Not only is there no IMF, the policy and programmatic responses of Asia have been antithesis to what the IMF formerly prescribed.

      • There was no interest cure that killed business; instead efforts were concentrated on preserving relative low interest rates (including intervention in the forex market).

      • There were many elements of direct transfers, subsidies, and re-capitalization; something the IMF would never do (at least before).

    • In short, the responses are not patently neoliberal.

 

  • Two, these responses have not warranted enough incentive towards a focus on internal demand, on the one hand, and on coordinated expanded demand regionally, on the other.

 

    • More pointedly, it is a concern that Asia should even set as its main objective the recovery and maintenance of consumption levels prior to the crisis.

    • We should not be overly concerned about trying to save what has been clearly a cause of failure. It is high time for Asia to draw from regional resources and invent something that will again set it apart – or, place it in cooperation with other regions trying to imagine things differently.

 

  • Three, there is concern that ASEAN+3 finds it difficult to make good on regional financial cooperation as designed through the Chiang Mai Initiative and related processes.

 

    • Take for instance, when South Korea got hit when the Lehman Brothers collapsed, it negotiated a $30B foreign exchange swap with the US Federal Reserve and not the ASEAN+3. (They came later.)

    • Despite increases in commitments, the CMI is still not functional, and the IMF still plays a role when countries tap the CMI for more than 20% of their requirement, detracting from the importance of financial as well policy autonomy for Asia.

 

 

There are certainly elements of response – some quite innovative or at least properly targeted – in Asia. The question is whether Asia is able to turn the crisis on its head, and be able to emerge with another unique contribution to development discourse as it has been known to have done in the past.

 

Moreover, we as civil society and social movements, in our interrogation of possible alternatives, esp. if we have little or no hold on power – the question of how to get that power either by holding political power ourselves or rallying massive constituencies on our side – is key.

 

The final set of points I wish to make has to do with the areas where regional response would be crucial:

 

  • One, the need to focus on internal demand and a more coordinated rationalization of regional demand.

 

    • There is need to re-imagine trade and production cooperation, where instead of competition, the prevailing principles would be cooperation, complementation and solidarity.

    • Such arrangement must address the issue of excess, and should have as outer limit some climate and ecological threshold.

 

  • Two, there is need to overhaul the financial architecture for Asia

 

    • Away from dependence on Northern currencies, esp. the American $

    • And towards the pooling of alternative sources of development finance

    • As well as appropriate surveillance and monitoring systems (without the IMF) that assist countries and build confidence that every one takes responsibility for regional financial stability

 

  • Three, there is need to strengthen regional stockpiling for food security

 

    • South Asia has better experience on this although technically Southeast Asia pledges bigger reserves

    • Away from trade logic and towards regional self-help and development of crisis response capabilities.

 

  • Four, there is need to re-imagine the public

 

    • It is time to talk about the public not only in the narrow confines of the State or the government, but also support different forms of provisioning that allowed communities to survive at a time that the State was neglecting them.

    • It must be recognized that such strength can be scaled up at the national and the regional level.

 

  • Five, whatever alternative we think of, resonance with the people is important.

 

    • We need to start where there is clear demand, and patent need, to make regional arrangements acceptable to the people

      • Migration

      • Rights and democracy

      • Decent living standards and environment

      • Ability to generate economic activity and distribute its fruits equitably

    • There is need to also work on something that works and shows results in the immediate even as the strategic alternative structures are still being constructed.

Jenina Joy Chavez / Focus on the Global South

 

(Presentation at the Conference on “Regional Integration: an Opportunity Presented by the Crisis”, sale Asuncion, sovaldi sale Paraguay, case July 21-22, 2009.)

 

What I will tackle this evening is an updated version of the notes I used for the Regional Integration: Opportunities to Face the Crisis conference in Asuncion, Paraguay, and the Philippine WS on ASEAN, earlier this year. There is no claim that regional responses are the only viable responses to the global crisis, but hopefully we would be able to determine if it is appropriate to study and consider them as part of the many options on alternates we can try.

 

Before the crisis, it has been projected that in about a decade, the South –that is, the developing countries – would account for more than half of the world income and more than 50% of global trade. It has been trumpeted all over that Asia together with other emerging economies would be the major growth drivers in the world economy, highlighting the relevance of South-South cooperation, particularly regional economic integration in Asia.

 

For Asia, at least, this claim has been put to the test with the onset of the global financial crisis that put into the spotlight the basic development paradigm deployed by what is considered the world over as prosperous Asia.

 

 

In terms of what has happened in the last year and a half, following are some observations on how Asia tried to respond to the crisis:

 

  • First, unlike what characterized how the North (particularly Western Europe and North America) responded to the crisis, Asia’s response does not include massive bailout packages to failing corporations, particularly ailing financial entities.

 

    • This highlights the differential manifestations of the crisis. While financialization is a global phenomenon, sparing no one and certainly not Asia, Asia still hosts one of the most robust productive capacity worldwide – that is, the real economy remains the most significant feature of Asia’s growth and development.

 

  • Second, in most countries, though, the immediate response was to address the liquidity crunch and the crisis of confidence, especially in the banking system. This included moves to increase deposit insurance coverage, and guarantees on deposit-taking institutions. As a result, massive bank runs have been avoided.

 

  • Third, from the initial liquidity crunch, economic slowdown became the norm. Hence, governments moved to address this by increasing liquidity and easing credit and monetary policy, including intervening in foreign exchange markets. Many state enterprises also increased their shareholdings in publicly-traded companies. The result – relative low interest rates.

 

  • Fourth, stimulus packages have at their center fiscal policy and public spending, although social sector spending has not received much attention.

 

    • Asian countries have devoted between less than ½ percent of GDP to their fiscal stimulus package to more than 9%.

    • Among the biggest packages are those of the following:

      • Singapore, $15B (6%)

      • Malaysia, $2B initially to $16B (9% of GDP)

      • China, $600B spread only over 2 years

    • Most of the stimulus packages have a central tax break or tax credit component, as well as capital spending, including re-capitalization of state-run banks, most notably in India.

 

  • Fifth, the Asian response has been centered around resiliency. That is, they are focused on minimizing unemployment and on creating employment opportunities

 

    • With programs like job credits or payouts to employers of up to 12% of salaries (Singapore)

    • Various skills upgrading and retraining programs

    • Welfare support to retrenched workers and returning overseas workers.

    • Such resiliency packages, though, highlighted some tensions inherent in the increasingly connected Asian economies and job markets.

      • For instance, part of Malaysia’s and Singapore’s response is to cut down or crackdown on migrant workers, a classic response to appease worker’s restiveness at home, and a blatant disregard to the ripple such moves might effect.

 

  • Sixth, at least the ASEAN+3 is trying to improve on a regional financial cooperation first introduced in 2000 as a response to the 97/98 Asian financial crisis.

    • The Chiang Mai Initiative is a collaboration to create a network of bilateral swap arrangements to manage short-term liquidity problems.

    • From $20B in 2000, it increased to $80B in 2008, and earlier this year was increased further to $120B.

    • Moreover, the swaps are being multilateralized, a step towards developing from a bilateral into a regional pool.

    • This is about the only such regional initiative in Asia. There is no equivalent for South Asia, or in West and Central Asia.

 

 

From these observations, several key questions emerge:

 

  • 1st: would Asia be able to export its way out of the crisis? Is it even proper to aim only for this?

 

  • 2nd:: would the regional integration vaunted to be necessary to solidify and further the growth in Asia be resorted to, or given life in practice, in the wake of this crisis?

 

  • 3rd: in the design of crisis response, what is Asia aiming for?

    • Is it just to recover previous levels of consumption and economic activity?

    • How much of the response is for immediate relief, extremely necessary at this time?

    • And how much of this response is for the long-term and tries to take advantage of converting the crisis into opportunity?

 

 

At this point, I would like to emphasize three points that interrogate what Asia has managed or not managed to do:

 

  • One, note that the responses now differ qualitatively from the responses Asia had a decade ago.

 

    • There is no IMF, not least because the IMF has gained notoriety and lost a lot of credibility because of how it bungled its job in the late 1990s.

    • Not only is there no IMF, the policy and programmatic responses of Asia have been antithesis to what the IMF formerly prescribed.

      • There was no interest cure that killed business; instead efforts were concentrated on preserving relative low interest rates (including intervention in the forex market).

      • There were many elements of direct transfers, subsidies, and re-capitalization; something the IMF would never do (at least before).

    • In short, the responses are not patently neoliberal.

 

  • Two, these responses have not warranted enough incentive towards a focus on internal demand, on the one hand, and on coordinated expanded demand regionally, on the other.

 

    • More pointedly, it is a concern that Asia should even set as its main objective the recovery and maintenance of consumption levels prior to the crisis.

    • We should not be overly concerned about trying to save what has been clearly a cause of failure. It is high time for Asia to draw from regional resources and invent something that will again set it apart – or, place it in cooperation with other regions trying to imagine things differently.

 

  • Three, there is concern that ASEAN+3 finds it difficult to make good on regional financial cooperation as designed through the Chiang Mai Initiative and related processes.

 

    • Take for instance, when South Korea got hit when the Lehman Brothers collapsed, it negotiated a $30B foreign exchange swap with the US Federal Reserve and not the ASEAN+3. (They came later.)

    • Despite increases in commitments, the CMI is still not functional, and the IMF still plays a role when countries tap the CMI for more than 20% of their requirement, detracting from the importance of financial as well policy autonomy for Asia.

 

 

There are certainly elements of response – some quite innovative or at least properly targeted – in Asia. The question is whether Asia is able to turn the crisis on its head, and be able to emerge with another unique contribution to development discourse as it has been known to have done in the past.

 

Moreover, we as civil society and social movements, in our interrogation of possible alternatives, esp. if we have little or no hold on power – the question of how to get that power either by holding political power ourselves or rallying massive constituencies on our side – is key.

 

The final set of points I wish to make has to do with the areas where regional response would be crucial:

 

  • One, the need to focus on internal demand and a more coordinated rationalization of regional demand.

 

    • There is need to re-imagine trade and production cooperation, where instead of competition, the prevailing principles would be cooperation, complementation and solidarity.

    • Such arrangement must address the issue of excess, and should have as outer limit some climate and ecological threshold.

 

  • Two, there is need to overhaul the financial architecture for Asia

 

    • Away from dependence on Northern currencies, esp. the American $

    • And towards the pooling of alternative sources of development finance

    • As well as appropriate surveillance and monitoring systems (without the IMF) that assist countries and build confidence that every one takes responsibility for regional financial stability

 

  • Three, there is need to strengthen regional stockpiling for food security

 

    • South Asia has better experience on this although technically Southeast Asia pledges bigger reserves

    • Away from trade logic and towards regional self-help and development of crisis response capabilities.

 

  • Four, there is need to re-imagine the public

 

    • It is time to talk about the public not only in the narrow confines of the State or the government, but also support different forms of provisioning that allowed communities to survive at a time that the State was neglecting them.

    • It must be recognized that such strength can be scaled up at the national and the regional level.

 

  • Five, whatever alternative we think of, resonance with the people is important.

 

    • We need to start where there is clear demand, and patent need, to make regional arrangements acceptable to the people

      • Migration

      • Rights and democracy

      • Decent living standards and environment

      • Ability to generate economic activity and distribute its fruits equitably

    • There is need to also work on something that works and shows results in the immediate even as the strategic alternative structures are still being constructed.

<!– @page { margin: 0.79in } P { margin-bottom: 0.08in } A:link { color: #0000ff } –>

Jenina Joy Chavez / Focus on the Global South

 

(Presentation at the Conference on “Regional Integration: an Opportunity Presented by the Crisis”, sale Asuncion, pills Paraguay, July 21-22, 2009.)

 

What I will tackle this evening is an updated version of the notes I used for the Regional Integration: Opportunities to Face the Crisis conference in Asuncion, Paraguay, and the Philippine WS on ASEAN, earlier this year. There is no claim that regional responses are the only viable responses to the global crisis, but hopefully we would be able to determine if it is appropriate to study and consider them as part of the many options on alternates we can try.

 

Before the crisis, it has been projected that in about a decade, the South –that is, the developing countries – would account for more than half of the world income and more than 50% of global trade. It has been trumpeted all over that Asia together with other emerging economies would be the major growth drivers in the world economy, highlighting the relevance of South-South cooperation, particularly regional economic integration in Asia.

 

For Asia, at least, this claim has been put to the test with the onset of the global financial crisis that put into the spotlight the basic development paradigm deployed by what is considered the world over as prosperous Asia.

 

 

In terms of what has happened in the last year and a half, following are some observations on how Asia tried to respond to the crisis:

 

  • First, unlike what characterized how the North (particularly Western Europe and North America) responded to the crisis, Asia’s response does not include massive bailout packages to failing corporations, particularly ailing financial entities.

 

    • This highlights the differential manifestations of the crisis. While financialization is a global phenomenon, sparing no one and certainly not Asia, Asia still hosts one of the most robust productive capacity worldwide – that is, the real economy remains the most significant feature of Asia’s growth and development.

 

  • Second, in most countries, though, the immediate response was to address the liquidity crunch and the crisis of confidence, especially in the banking system. This included moves to increase deposit insurance coverage, and guarantees on deposit-taking institutions. As a result, massive bank runs have been avoided.

 

  • Third, from the initial liquidity crunch, economic slowdown became the norm. Hence, governments moved to address this by increasing liquidity and easing credit and monetary policy, including intervening in foreign exchange markets. Many state enterprises also increased their shareholdings in publicly-traded companies. The result – relative low interest rates.

 

  • Fourth, stimulus packages have at their center fiscal policy and public spending, although social sector spending has not received much attention.

 

    • Asian countries have devoted between less than ½ percent of GDP to their fiscal stimulus package to more than 9%.

    • Among the biggest packages are those of the following:

      • Singapore, $15B (6%)

      • Malaysia, $2B initially to $16B (9% of GDP)

      • China, $600B spread only over 2 years

    • Most of the stimulus packages have a central tax break or tax credit component, as well as capital spending, including re-capitalization of state-run banks, most notably in India.

 

  • Fifth, the Asian response has been centered around resiliency. That is, they are focused on minimizing unemployment and on creating employment opportunities

 

    • With programs like job credits or payouts to employers of up to 12% of salaries (Singapore)

    • Various skills upgrading and retraining programs

    • Welfare support to retrenched workers and returning overseas workers.

    • Such resiliency packages, though, highlighted some tensions inherent in the increasingly connected Asian economies and job markets.

      • For instance, part of Malaysia’s and Singapore’s response is to cut down or crackdown on migrant workers, a classic response to appease worker’s restiveness at home, and a blatant disregard to the ripple such moves might effect.

 

  • Sixth, at least the ASEAN+3 is trying to improve on a regional financial cooperation first introduced in 2000 as a response to the 97/98 Asian financial crisis.

    • The Chiang Mai Initiative is a collaboration to create a network of bilateral swap arrangements to manage short-term liquidity problems.

    • From $20B in 2000, it increased to $80B in 2008, and earlier this year was increased further to $120B.

    • Moreover, the swaps are being multilateralized, a step towards developing from a bilateral into a regional pool.

    • This is about the only such regional initiative in Asia. There is no equivalent for South Asia, or in West and Central Asia.

 

 

From these observations, several key questions emerge:

 

  • 1st: would Asia be able to export its way out of the crisis? Is it even proper to aim only for this?

 

  • 2nd:: would the regional integration vaunted to be necessary to solidify and further the growth in Asia be resorted to, or given life in practice, in the wake of this crisis?

 

  • 3rd: in the design of crisis response, what is Asia aiming for?

    • Is it just to recover previous levels of consumption and economic activity?

    • How much of the response is for immediate relief, extremely necessary at this time?

    • And how much of this response is for the long-term and tries to take advantage of converting the crisis into opportunity?

 

 

At this point, I would like to emphasize three points that interrogate what Asia has managed or not managed to do:

 

  • One, note that the responses now differ qualitatively from the responses Asia had a decade ago.

 

    • There is no IMF, not least because the IMF has gained notoriety and lost a lot of credibility because of how it bungled its job in the late 1990s.

    • Not only is there no IMF, the policy and programmatic responses of Asia have been antithesis to what the IMF formerly prescribed.

      • There was no interest cure that killed business; instead efforts were concentrated on preserving relative low interest rates (including intervention in the forex market).

      • There were many elements of direct transfers, subsidies, and re-capitalization; something the IMF would never do (at least before).

    • In short, the responses are not patently neoliberal.

 

  • Two, these responses have not warranted enough incentive towards a focus on internal demand, on the one hand, and on coordinated expanded demand regionally, on the other.

 

    • More pointedly, it is a concern that Asia should even set as its main objective the recovery and maintenance of consumption levels prior to the crisis.

    • We should not be overly concerned about trying to save what has been clearly a cause of failure. It is high time for Asia to draw from regional resources and invent something that will again set it apart – or, place it in cooperation with other regions trying to imagine things differently.

 

  • Three, there is concern that ASEAN+3 finds it difficult to make good on regional financial cooperation as designed through the Chiang Mai Initiative and related processes.

 

    • Take for instance, when South Korea got hit when the Lehman Brothers collapsed, it negotiated a $30B foreign exchange swap with the US Federal Reserve and not the ASEAN+3. (They came later.)

    • Despite increases in commitments, the CMI is still not functional, and the IMF still plays a role when countries tap the CMI for more than 20% of their requirement, detracting from the importance of financial as well policy autonomy for Asia.

 

 

There are certainly elements of response – some quite innovative or at least properly targeted – in Asia. The question is whether Asia is able to turn the crisis on its head, and be able to emerge with another unique contribution to development discourse as it has been known to have done in the past.

 

Moreover, we as civil society and social movements, in our interrogation of possible alternatives, esp. if we have little or no hold on power – the question of how to get that power either by holding political power ourselves or rallying massive constituencies on our side – is key.

 

The final set of points I wish to make has to do with the areas where regional response would be crucial:

 

  • One, the need to focus on internal demand and a more coordinated rationalization of regional demand.

 

    • There is need to re-imagine trade and production cooperation, where instead of competition, the prevailing principles would be cooperation, complementation and solidarity.

    • Such arrangement must address the issue of excess, and should have as outer limit some climate and ecological threshold.

 

  • Two, there is need to overhaul the financial architecture for Asia

 

    • Away from dependence on Northern currencies, esp. the American $

    • And towards the pooling of alternative sources of development finance

    • As well as appropriate surveillance and monitoring systems (without the IMF) that assist countries and build confidence that every one takes responsibility for regional financial stability

 

  • Three, there is need to strengthen regional stockpiling for food security

 

    • South Asia has better experience on this although technically Southeast Asia pledges bigger reserves

    • Away from trade logic and towards regional self-help and development of crisis response capabilities.

 

  • Four, there is need to re-imagine the public

 

    • It is time to talk about the public not only in the narrow confines of the State or the government, but also support different forms of provisioning that allowed communities to survive at a time that the State was neglecting them.

    • It must be recognized that such strength can be scaled up at the national and the regional level.

 

  • Five, whatever alternative we think of, resonance with the people is important.

 

    • We need to start where there is clear demand, and patent need, to make regional arrangements acceptable to the people

      • Migration

      • Rights and democracy

      • Decent living standards and environment

      • Ability to generate economic activity and distribute its fruits equitably

    • There is need to also work on something that works and shows results in the immediate even as the strategic alternative structures are still being constructed.

See Programme and download some of the presentations of the

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises”

DATES: 21 and 22 July 2009
VENUE: PRODEPA, Sala 1, Consejo Nacional del Deporte, Asunción del Paraguay
TIME: 9am-20pm


PROGRAMME


21 JULY

09:00–09:30

Opening: Greeting from organisers

– Enrique Daza, Executive Secretary, Hemispheric Social Alliance, Colombia
– Brid Brennan, TNI/Peoples’ Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms, Netherlands
– Guillermo Ortega, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay
– Héctor Lacognata, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay

09:30–11:30 Systemic Crisis, impacts of the crisis on regional integration processes

– Juan Gonzalez, MOSIP, Argentina
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Tetteh Hormeku, TWN/ATN, Ghana

– Elizabeth Gauthier, Espace Marx, France (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION ENGLISH – POWER POINT / TEXT)

Moderation

Cecilia Olivet,

TNI, Netherlands

11:30-13:30 Regional responses to the crises

– Juan Castillo, Secretary for International Relations PIT-CNT, Uruguay

– Demba Moussa Dembele, African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South, Philippines (PRESENTATION)
– Frederic Viale, ATTAC France

Moderation

José Miguel Hernández,

CTC Nacional/ CC-ASC, Cuba

13:30-15:00 Lunch
15:00-17:30 Regional Integration: Re-thinking the development model. Complementarity versus competition. Integration and Asymmetries

– Jorge Lara Castro, Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay
– Oscar Laborde, Government Argentina

– Tomas Palau, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

– Graciela Rodriguez, REBRIP, Brazil

– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)

– Charles Santiago, Member of Parliament, Malaysia

Moderation

Gonzalo Berrón,

ASC/CSA, Brazil

17:30-18:00 Coffee break
18:00-20:00 Development Model and Infrastructure
– Guilherme Carvalho, Rede Brasil sobre  Instituições Financeiras Multilaterais, Brazil
– Ricardo Miranda, Confederación Sindical Única de Trabajadores Campesinos de Bolivia (CSUTCB), Bolivia
– Michelle Pressend, Trade Strategy Group, South Africa

Moderation

Ximana Centellas,

Directora General de

Gestión Pública,

Viceministerio de

Coordinación y Gestión Gubernamental, Bolivia


22 JULY


09:00-10:45 Energy Crisis and Climate Change: the challenge to find regional solutions

– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines

– Pablo Bertinat, Cono Sur Sustentable, Argentina (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – SPANISH)
– Roberto Colman, Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – SPANISH)
– Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Accion, Spain

Moderation
Fernando Rojas, Decidamos,

Iniciativa Paraguaya por la

Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

10:45-11:00 Coffe Break
11:00-13:00 Production model and Food Sovereignty

– Juan José Dominguez, Member of Parliament, MPP–FA, Uruguay

– Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal
– Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia
– Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe
– Francisca Rodriguez, CONAMURI/CLOC, Chile (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION SPANISH)

Moderation

Martin Prieto, Redes Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay

13:00-14:00 Lunch
14:00–16:00 Finances and development model: New financial structures: (Bank of the South, regional currencies, etc)
– Pedro Paez, President of the Ecuadorian Presidential Technical Commission for the New Regional Financial Architecture and Bank of the South, Ecuador
– Beverly Keene, Jubilee South, Argentina
– Ivan Lukas, Glopolis, Czech Republic

Moderation

Veronique Sandoval, Espace Marx, France

16:00-17:00 Regional Peace, Democracy and Human Rights

– Lee, Seung-Heon, Chief External Relations Department of the Korea Democratic Labor Party, South Korea (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Camille Chalmers, Campaign for Demilitarisation of the Americas, Haiti

– Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Pezo Mateo-Phiri, SAPSN, Zambia (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)

Moderation

Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ

Paraguay/ Iniciativa

Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos, Paraguay

17:00–17:30 Coffee break
17:30–20:00

Round Table: Regional Integration: challenges for the movements and the governments

– Chacho Alvarez, President Committee of Permanent Representatives of MERCOSUR, Argentina
– Ana Cristina Betancourt Garcia, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia
– Gustavo Codas, Government Paraguay
– Franklin Gonzalez, Government Venezuela
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/TNI, Venezuela
– Walden Bello, Focus on the Global South/MP, Philippines
– Nalu Farias, World March of Women, Brazil
– Brid Brennan, TNI, Netherlands
– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa
Moderation
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México


Co- Organisers
Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), Iniciativa Paraguaya para la Integración de los Pueblos, People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR), Focus on the Global South and Transnational Institute (TNI)

In cooperation with
Trade Union Confederation of the Americas (TUCA), Southern African People’s Solidarity Network (SAPSN), People’s SAARC, Solidarity for Asian People’s Advocacy (SAPA)


SEE the COMMUNIQUE: Regional Integration and Itaipu energy agreement (Paraguay, 22 July 2009)

See Programme and download some of the presentations of the

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises”

DATES: 21 and 22 July 2009
VENUE: PRODEPA, Sala 1, seek Consejo Nacional del Deporte, Asunción del Paraguay
TIME: 9am-20pm


PROGRAMME


21 JULY

09:00–09:30

Opening: Greeting from organisers

– Enrique Daza, Executive Secretary, Hemispheric Social Alliance, Colombia
– Brid Brennan, TNI/Peoples’ Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms, Netherlands
– Guillermo Ortega, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay
– Héctor Lacognata, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay

09:30–11:30 Systemic Crisis, impacts of the crisis on regional integration processes

– Juan Gonzalez, MOSIP, Argentina
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Tetteh Hormeku, TWN/ATN, Ghana

– Elizabeth Gauthier, Espace Marx, France (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION ENGLISH – POWER POINT / TEXT)

Moderation

Cecilia Olivet,

TNI, Netherlands

11:30-13:30 Regional responses to the crises

– Juan Castillo, Secretary for International Relations PIT-CNT, Uruguay

– Demba Moussa Dembele, African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South, Philippines
– Frederic Viale, ATTAC France

Moderation

José Miguel Hernández,

CTC Nacional/ CC-ASC, Cuba

13:30-15:00 Lunch
15:00-17:30 Regional Integration: Re-thinking the development model. Complementarity versus competition. Integration and Asymmetries

– Jorge Lara Castro, Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay
– Oscar Laborde, Government Argentina

– Tomas Palau, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

– Graciela Rodriguez, REBRIP, Brazil

– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)

– Charles Santiago, Member of Parliament, Malaysia

Moderation

Gonzalo Berrón,

ASC/CSA, Brazil

17:30-18:00 Coffee break
18:00-20:00 Development Model and Infrastructure
– Guilherme Carvalho, Rede Brasil sobre  Instituições Financeiras Multilaterais, Brazil
– Ricardo Miranda, Confederación Sindical Única de Trabajadores Campesinos de Bolivia (CSUTCB), Bolivia
– Michelle Pressend, Trade Strategy Group, South Africa

Moderation

Ximana Centellas,

Directora General de

Gestión Pública,

Viceministerio de

Coordinación y Gestión Gubernamental, Bolivia


22 JULY


09:00-10:45 Energy Crisis and Climate Change: the challenge to find regional solutions

– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines

– Pablo Bertinat, Cono Sur Sustentable, Argentina (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – SPANISH)
– Roberto Colman, Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – SPANISH)
– Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Accion, Spain

Moderation
Fernando Rojas, Decidamos,

Iniciativa Paraguaya por la

Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

10:45-11:00 Coffe Break
11:00-13:00 Production model and Food Sovereignty

– Juan José Dominguez, Member of Parliament, MPP–FA, Uruguay

– Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal
– Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia
– Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe
– Francisca Rodriguez, CONAMURI/CLOC, Chile (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION SPANISH)

Moderation

Martin Prieto, Redes Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay

13:00-14:00 Lunch
14:00–16:00 Finances and development model: New financial structures: (Bank of the South, regional currencies, etc)
– Pedro Paez, President of the Ecuadorian Presidential Technical Commission for the New Regional Financial Architecture and Bank of the South, Ecuador
– Beverly Keene, Jubilee South, Argentina
– Ivan Lukas, Glopolis, Czech Republic

Moderation

Veronique Sandoval, Espace Marx, France

16:00-17:00 Regional Peace, Democracy and Human Rights

– Lee, Seung-Heon, Chief External Relations Department of the Korea Democratic Labor Party, South Korea (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Camille Chalmers, Campaign for Demilitarisation of the Americas, Haiti

– Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Pezo Mateo-Phiri, SAPSN, Zambia (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)

Moderation

Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ

Paraguay/ Iniciativa

Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos, Paraguay

17:00–17:30 Coffee break
17:30–20:00

Round Table: Regional Integration: challenges for the movements and the governments

– Chacho Alvarez, President Committee of Permanent Representatives of MERCOSUR, Argentina
– Ana Cristina Betancourt Garcia, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia
– Gustavo Codas, Government Paraguay
– Franklin Gonzalez, Government Venezuela
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/TNI, Venezuela
– Walden Bello, Focus on the Global South/MP, Philippines
– Nalu Farias, World March of Women, Brazil
– Brid Brennan, TNI, Netherlands
– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa
Moderation
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México


Co- Organisers
Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), Iniciativa Paraguaya para la Integración de los Pueblos, People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR), Focus on the Global South and Transnational Institute (TNI)

In cooperation with
Trade Union Confederation of the Americas (TUCA), Southern African People’s Solidarity Network (SAPSN), People’s SAARC, Solidarity for Asian People’s Advocacy (SAPA)


SEE the COMMUNIQUE: Regional Integration and Itaipu energy agreement (Paraguay, 22 July 2009)

See Programme and download some of the presentations of the

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises”

DATES: 21 and 22 July 2009
VENUE: PRODEPA, salve Sala 1, clinic Consejo Nacional del Deporte, purchase Asunción del Paraguay
TIME: 9am-20pm


PROGRAMME


21 JULY

09:00–09:30

Opening: Greeting from organisers

– Enrique Daza, Executive Secretary, Hemispheric Social Alliance, Colombia
– Brid Brennan, TNI/Peoples’ Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms, Netherlands
– Guillermo Ortega, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay
– Héctor Lacognata, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay

09:30–11:30 Systemic Crisis, impacts of the crisis on regional integration processes

– Juan Gonzalez, MOSIP, Argentina
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Tetteh Hormeku, TWN/ATN, Ghana

– Elizabeth Gauthier, Espace Marx, France (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION ENGLISH – POWER POINT / TEXT)

Moderation

Cecilia Olivet,

TNI, Netherlands

11:30-13:30 Regional responses to the crises

– Juan Castillo, Secretary for International Relations PIT-CNT, Uruguay

– Demba Moussa Dembele, African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South, Philippines (PRESENTATION)
– Frederic Viale, ATTAC France

Moderation

José Miguel Hernández,

CTC Nacional/ CC-ASC, Cuba

13:30-15:00 Lunch
15:00-17:30 Regional Integration: Re-thinking the development model. Complementarity versus competition. Integration and Asymmetries

– Jorge Lara Castro, Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay
– Oscar Laborde, Government Argentina

– Tomas Palau, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

– Graciela Rodriguez, REBRIP, Brazil

– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)

– Charles Santiago, Member of Parliament, Malaysia

Moderation

Gonzalo Berrón,

ASC/CSA, Brazil

17:30-18:00 Coffee break
18:00-20:00 Development Model and Infrastructure
– Guilherme Carvalho, Rede Brasil sobre  Instituições Financeiras Multilaterais, Brazil
– Ricardo Miranda, Confederación Sindical Única de Trabajadores Campesinos de Bolivia (CSUTCB), Bolivia
– Michelle Pressend, Trade Strategy Group, South Africa

Moderation

Ximana Centellas,

Directora General de

Gestión Pública,

Viceministerio de

Coordinación y Gestión Gubernamental, Bolivia


22 JULY


09:00-10:45 Energy Crisis and Climate Change: the challenge to find regional solutions

– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines

– Pablo Bertinat, Cono Sur Sustentable, Argentina (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – SPANISH)
– Roberto Colman, Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – SPANISH)
– Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Accion, Spain

Moderation
Fernando Rojas, Decidamos,

Iniciativa Paraguaya por la

Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

10:45-11:00 Coffe Break
11:00-13:00 Production model and Food Sovereignty

– Juan José Dominguez, Member of Parliament, MPP–FA, Uruguay

– Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal
– Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia
– Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe
– Francisca Rodriguez, CONAMURI/CLOC, Chile (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION SPANISH)

Moderation

Martin Prieto, Redes Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay

13:00-14:00 Lunch
14:00–16:00 Finances and development model: New financial structures: (Bank of the South, regional currencies, etc)
– Pedro Paez, President of the Ecuadorian Presidential Technical Commission for the New Regional Financial Architecture and Bank of the South, Ecuador
– Beverly Keene, Jubilee South, Argentina
– Ivan Lukas, Glopolis, Czech Republic

Moderation

Veronique Sandoval, Espace Marx, France

16:00-17:00 Regional Peace, Democracy and Human Rights

– Lee, Seung-Heon, Chief External Relations Department of the Korea Democratic Labor Party, South Korea (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Camille Chalmers, Campaign for Demilitarisation of the Americas, Haiti

– Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Pezo Mateo-Phiri, SAPSN, Zambia (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)

Moderation

Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ

Paraguay/ Iniciativa

Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos, Paraguay

17:00–17:30 Coffee break
17:30–20:00

Round Table: Regional Integration: challenges for the movements and the governments

– Chacho Alvarez, President Committee of Permanent Representatives of MERCOSUR, Argentina
– Ana Cristina Betancourt Garcia, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia
– Gustavo Codas, Government Paraguay
– Franklin Gonzalez, Government Venezuela
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/TNI, Venezuela
– Walden Bello, Focus on the Global South/MP, Philippines
– Nalu Farias, World March of Women, Brazil
– Brid Brennan, TNI, Netherlands
– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa
Moderation
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México


Co- Organisers
Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), Iniciativa Paraguaya para la Integración de los Pueblos, People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR), Focus on the Global South and Transnational Institute (TNI)

In cooperation with
Trade Union Confederation of the Americas (TUCA), Southern African People’s Solidarity Network (SAPSN), People’s SAARC, Solidarity for Asian People’s Advocacy (SAPA)


SEE the COMMUNIQUE: Regional Integration and Itaipu energy agreement (Paraguay, 22 July 2009)

See Programme and download some of the presentations of the

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE of GOVERNMENTS and SOCIAL MOVEMENTS “Regional Integration: an opportunity to face the crises”

DATES: 21 and 22 July 2009
VENUE: PRODEPA, troche ask Sala 1, Consejo Nacional del Deporte, Asunción del Paraguay
TIME: 9am-20pm


PROGRAMME


21 JULY

09:00–09:30

Opening: Greeting from organisers

– Enrique Daza, Executive Secretary, Hemispheric Social Alliance, Colombia
– Brid Brennan, TNI/Peoples’ Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms, Netherlands
– Guillermo Ortega, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay
– Héctor Lacognata, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay

09:30–11:30 Systemic Crisis, impacts of the crisis on regional integration processes

– Juan Gonzalez, MOSIP, Argentina
– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Tetteh Hormeku, TWN/ATN, Ghana

– Elizabeth Gauthier, Espace Marx, France (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION ENGLISH – POWER POINT / TEXT)

Moderation

Cecilia Olivet,

TNI, Netherlands

11:30-13:30 Regional responses to the crises

– Juan Castillo, Secretary for International Relations PIT-CNT, Uruguay

– Demba Moussa Dembele, African Forum on Alternatives, Senegal (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South, Philippines (PRESENTATION)
– Frederic Viale, ATTAC France

Moderation

José Miguel Hernández,

CTC Nacional/ CC-ASC, Cuba

13:30-15:00 Lunch
15:00-17:30 Regional Integration: Re-thinking the development model. Complementarity versus competition. Integration and Asymmetries

– Jorge Lara Castro, Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs, Paraguay
– Oscar Laborde, Government Argentina

– Tomas Palau, Base IS, Iniciativa Paraguaya por la Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

– Graciela Rodriguez, REBRIP, Brazil

– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)

– Charles Santiago, Member of Parliament, Malaysia

Moderation

Gonzalo Berrón,

ASC/CSA, Brazil

17:30-18:00 Coffee break
18:00-20:00 Development Model and Infrastructure
– Guilherme Carvalho, Rede Brasil sobre  Instituições Financeiras Multilaterais, Brazil
– Ricardo Miranda, Confederación Sindical Única de Trabajadores Campesinos de Bolivia (CSUTCB), Bolivia
– Michelle Pressend, Trade Strategy Group, South Africa

Moderation

Ximana Centellas,

Directora General de

Gestión Pública,

Viceministerio de

Coordinación y Gestión Gubernamental, Bolivia


22 JULY


09:00-10:45 Energy Crisis and Climate Change: the challenge to find regional solutions

– Walden Bello, Member of Parliament, Philippines

– Pablo Bertinat, Cono Sur Sustentable, Argentina (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – SPANISH)
– Roberto Colman, Coordinadora Soberanía Energética, Paraguay (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – SPANISH)
– Tom Kucharz, Ecologistas en Accion, Spain

Moderation
Fernando Rojas, Decidamos,

Iniciativa Paraguaya por la

Integración de los Pueblos, Paraguay

10:45-11:00 Coffe Break
11:00-13:00 Production model and Food Sovereignty

– Juan José Dominguez, Member of Parliament, MPP–FA, Uruguay

– Rabindra Adhikari, Member of Parliament, Nepal
– Indra Lubis, La Via Campesina, Indonesia
– Lodwick Chizarura, SEATINI, Zimbabwe
– Francisca Rodriguez, CONAMURI/CLOC, Chile (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION SPANISH)

Moderation

Martin Prieto, Redes Amigos de la Tierra, Uruguay

13:00-14:00 Lunch
14:00–16:00 Finances and development model: New financial structures: (Bank of the South, regional currencies, etc)
– Pedro Paez, President of the Ecuadorian Presidential Technical Commission for the New Regional Financial Architecture and Bank of the South, Ecuador
– Beverly Keene, Jubilee South, Argentina
– Ivan Lukas, Glopolis, Czech Republic

Moderation

Veronique Sandoval, Espace Marx, France

16:00-17:00 Regional Peace, Democracy and Human Rights

– Lee, Seung-Heon, Chief External Relations Department of the Korea Democratic Labor Party, South Korea (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Camille Chalmers, Campaign for Demilitarisation of the Americas, Haiti

– Meena Menon, Focus on the Global South, India (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Thomas Wallgren, Coalition for comprehensive democracy – Vasudhaiva Kutumkakam, Finland (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)
– Pezo Mateo-Phiri, SAPSN, Zambia (DOWNLOAD PRESENTATION – ENGLISH)

Moderation

Ramon Corvalan, SERPAJ

Paraguay/ Iniciativa

Paraguaya por la integracion de los Pueblos, Paraguay

17:00–17:30 Coffee break
17:30–20:00

Round Table: Regional Integration: challenges for the movements and the governments

– Chacho Alvarez, President Committee of Permanent Representatives of MERCOSUR, Argentina
– Ana Cristina Betancourt Garcia, Ministerio de Autonomía, Bolivia
– Gustavo Codas, Government Paraguay
– Franklin Gonzalez, Government Venezuela
– Edgardo Lander, Universidad Central de Venezuela/TNI, Venezuela
– Walden Bello, Focus on the Global South/MP, Philippines
– Nalu Farias, World March of Women, Brazil
– Brid Brennan, TNI, Netherlands
– Dot Keet, SAPSN, South Africa
Moderation
Héctor de la Cueva, RMALC, México


Co- Organisers
Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), Iniciativa Paraguaya para la Integración de los Pueblos, People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR), Focus on the Global South and Transnational Institute (TNI)

In cooperation with
Trade Union Confederation of the Americas (TUCA), Southern African People’s Solidarity Network (SAPSN), People’s SAARC, Solidarity for Asian People’s Advocacy (SAPA)


SEE the COMMUNIQUE: Regional Integration and Itaipu energy agreement (Paraguay, 22 July 2009)

20 October 2009, 18-21hs, Cha-am, Thailand

This Public Forum was held during the 2nd ASEAN Peoples’ Forum / 5th ASEAN Civil Society Conference 18-20 October 2009 Cha-am, Phetchaburi Province, Thailand

Introduction

Finding solutions to the crises (economic, energy, food, climate and security) is urgent, and today it is at the core of the agenda of both social movements and governments. For countries in the different regions, regional integration appears as a way to overcome the global economic crisis through the development of solidarity and dynamic intra-regional economic ties.

In this context, re-thinking regional integration as a solution to the crisis can give a powerful impulse to building an alternative development project in each region (Latin America, Asia, Africa and Europe) that is more sustainable and equitable than the current development model which countries follow today.

However, the current regional spaces are contested arenas. It is crucial, therefore, that social movements search and seek for common strategies.

The Open Forum will advance the debate and cross-fertilisation of experiences among social movements and civil society organisations from Latin America, Asia and Europe about the possibilities to respond to these crises through regional alternatives and a model of regional integration that promotes a change in the development model of the regions. It will aim to highlight the challenges and possibilities of moving forward in the concretisation of regional alternatives to the economic, financial, food, climate and energy crises that place the interest of people and the planet at its center.

PROGRAMME

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from South East Asia (ASEAN)
Joy Chavez, Focus on the Global South/SAPA/ACSC, Philippines

 

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from Latin America
Diana Aguiar, IGTN/REBRIP/Hemispheric Social Alliance, Brazil

 

Regional responses to the crisis: experiences & challenges from South Asia (SAARC)

Mohammed Mahuruf, People’s SAARC, Sri Lanka

 

European regional responses to the crisis and People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms
Cecilia Olivet, Transnational Institute, Netherlands

Open Forum Discussion: The potential of regional alternatives and the need for cross-regional networking – focus and priorities

Moderator: Aya Fabros, Focus on the Global South, Philippines

 

Co-Convenors:

Focus on the Global South, Hemispheric Social Alliance (HSA), People’s SAARC, Transnational Institute (TNI) and People’s Agenda for Alternative Regionalisms (PAAR)

 

Asean People's Forum (APF) Economic Pillar Plenary Report: "Deconstructing the ASEAN Economic Ambition, A Conversation among Advocates, Analysts and Activists"

The ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) vision talks about a stable, check prosperous, try and highly competitive region, with equitable economic development, and reduced poverty and economic disparities. Its goal is to hasten complete liberalization and opening up of the regional economy by 2015.
However, this framework of a competitive market economy which mainly benefits MNCs/TNCs in developed countries has long been criticized. In addition, it has only benefited developed ASEAN countries and has undermined developing countries within the region – thereby exacerbating regional asymmetries, leading to greater poverty and inequality. The economic integration model pursued by ASEAN has negatively impacted its working peoples and their families where working conditions, livelihoods and living standards have deteriorated.

Urgent Issues
(1) ASEAN’s ambitious trade and investment deals, coupled with the weakening of regulations at the national and regional levels has led to the worsening of poverty and inequality in the region, especially among small farmers, indigenous peoples, small fishers, labor and migrant workers, people with disabilities, women, and youth.
(2) ASEAN’s processes in relation to the economic pillar have been the most secretive. There has been no participation of and consultation with civil society, much more with the grassroots people directly affected by their economic policies. Likewise, the impacts of economic integration are not closely monitored and review mechanisms are unclear.
(3) Issues of civil society, in particular migrant workers, women, youth and people with disability, are not holistically integrated in the ASEAN community pillars. These are mainly boxed in the socio-cultural pillar instead of the economic. Yet many of the economic investments in the region are taking place at the expense of ASEAN’s working peoples. Legal frameworks at national and regional levels are also not keeping up to protect their rights and livelihoods.

Recommendations
(1) ASEAN must give priority to building a people’s community and recognize the potentials of grassroots/alternative economies. It should support and provide the legal framework to promote local people’s initiatives, identify good models and replicate them. It should invest in capacitating people to participate in trade instead of favoring MNCs and TNCs. ASEAN should review the impact of all agreements it has signed, together with the people. Its economic integration must become a means to allow people to live well and enable developing countries and marginalized communities to achieve sustainable development.
(2) Its economic policies must be responsive to sensitive sectors important to food sovereignty, biodiversity and people’s livelihood. The vulnerable sectors must be given a stronger voice in ASEAN economic investment policy-making because these impact on their lives and livelihoods. TNCs cannot be the drivers of caring and sharing communities. Indigenous knowledge economies based on solidarity economy such as micro-finance institutions, cooperatives, small farmers/producers organizations, marketing groups, and various resource management schemes by indigenous peoples have long been established and ASEAN only needs to build on these gains by the people.
(3) We urge ASEAN to recognize the role of civil society and institutionalize their participation in building a democratic, just, and “people-centered” ASEAN. ASEAN must maximize consultation with involved and concerned sectors during the entire policy formulation process – from the creation of working groups, preparation of drafts and actual policy implementation. Feedback and evaluation of effectiveness of policies must involve the people.
(4) We appeal for support for the ASEAN Framework Instrument on the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Migrant Workers. ASEAN needs to recognize all peoples of ASEAN communities, including the problems of stateless workers. ASEAN should pursue the framework of Development and Migration as a means of reducing barriers to migration and creating more positive effects for development.
(5) We demand the attention and action of ASEAN on the causes of small fisherfolks which are hardly heard at the regional level. The Coral Triangle Initiative (CTI) in particular has the objective of preserving fishing grounds in the region yet there is no representation by small fishers in the body. Further, we reiterate our call to ASEAN to establish a Council for Small Farmers/Producers and Fishers, and an Agricultural Policy that upholds their economic rights, protects land rights and promotes food sovereignty in the region.

Concluding Points
The interconnection of the community pillars is clear. ASEAN’s approach of compartmentalizing civil society engagements as socio-cultural will prevent itself from benefiting from the capacities of CSOs for integrative development. Along this, we seek to highlight the following:
(1) the question of process – representation and transparency on how economic agreements are negotiated by ASEAN;
(2) the question of impact – whether ASEAN and member states are making appropriate interventions in the economic sphere; and
(3) the need for new ways of organizing the economy, responding to people’s needs.
This is the big call not only for ASEAN but for all of us.
The final challenge rests on the ASEAN people: let us move forward in solidarity and be more concrete in un-marginalizing ourselves. Let us collect the little spaces and power that we have to build our own people’s economy. Let us put into action our principles and not wait for accountable institutions to make our dreams into reality.


Download Full PDF


VII Cumbre ALBA-TCP: Principios Fundamentales del Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos – TCP

4 y 5 de Diciembre 2006, previa a la II Cumbre de de la Comunidad Sudamérica de Naciones, clinic cincuenta lideres y lideresas indígenas de nueve países suramericanos discutieron en Cochabamba sobre la integración suramericana. Posteriormente,
del 6 a 9 de Diciembre, y en paralelo a la Cumbre presidencial se organizó la Cumbre Social por la Integración de los Pueblos. La Cumbre Social por la Integración de los Pueblos fue un espacio único de participación y dialogo entre actores gubernamentales y de la sociedad civil. Como resultado, 13 sesiones temáticas formularon propuestas para la institucionalidad de la integración suramericana. Una de estas sesiones fue la Sesión de los Pueblos Indígenas y Naciones Originarios, en la cuál los líderes mencionados anteriormente tuvieron un papel protagonista. Muchos de ellos y ellas forman parte de la Coordinadora Andina de Organizaciones Indígenas (CAOI). Estos eventos y posteriores actividades de la sociedad civil Suramericana dirigidas a “Otra Suramérica posible”, y específicamente las acciones referidas a la integración Suramericana que implementó la CAOI entre el inicio de 2007 y mayo 2009, forman la base de este documento. El libro analiza los procesos de la integración Suramericana desde una perspectiva amplia, relacionándoles a los procesos de la integración interamericano, latinoamericano, y regional (por ejemplo Andes, Amazonía, Cono Sur). Asimismo, partiendo de las propuestas de la sociedad civil ya formuladas, particularmente las de CAOI, el libro elabora algunas ideas para una posible institucionalidad suramericana Específicamente, el libro argumenta que la integración suramericana debe tener un carácter propio continental incluyendo los pensamientos andino-amazónicos y respetando los derechos humanos y de la naturaleza. En este sentido, se describen los crecientes impactos sociales y ambientales de la Iniciativa para la Integración de la Infraestructura Regional Sudamericana (IIRSA) y se discuten varios hitos importantes referidos a la integración suramericana: por ejemplo la construcción de la Unión de las Naciones Suramericanas (UNASUR), y la construcción del Banco del Sur. Integración es la construcción de múltiples puentes. Por lo tanto adicionalmente se estudian diferentes corrientes políticas y filosóficas que tienen un papel importante en la construcción de la integración suramericana y las posibilidades de seducir a los sectores que tienen diferentes opiniones, para definir como se puede tener una articulación que óptimamente podrá contribuir a una integración suramericana que de un lado promueva acciones económicas, sociales, culturales y ambientales conjuntas a nivel de América del Sur para el bienestar de su población y su naturaleza y de otro lado promueva un papel protagonista de Suramérica en la confrontación de las crisis a nivel global.

4 y 5 de Diciembre 2006, previa a la II Cumbre de de la Comunidad Sudamérica de Naciones, hospital cincuenta lideres y lideresas indígenas de nueve países suramericanos discutieron en Cochabamba sobre la integración suramericana. Posteriormente, del 6 a 9 de Diciembre, y en paralelo a la Cumbre presidencial se organizó la Cumbre Social por la Integración de los Pueblos. La Cumbre Social por la Integración de los Pueblos fue un espacio único de participación y dialogo entre actores gubernamentales y de la sociedad civil. Como resultado, 13 sesiones temáticas formularon propuestas para la institucionalidad de la integración suramericana. Una de estas sesiones fue la Sesión de los Pueblos Indígenas y Naciones Originarios, en la cuál los líderes mencionados anteriormente tuvieron un papel protagonista. Muchos de ellos y ellas forman parte de la Coordinadora Andina de Organizaciones Indígenas (CAOI). Estos eventos y posteriores actividades de la sociedad civil Suramericana dirigidas a “Otra Suramérica posible”, y específicamente las acciones referidas a la integración Suramericana que implementó la CAOI entre el inicio de 2007 y mayo 2009, forman la base de este documento. El libro analiza los procesos de la integración Suramericana desde una perspectiva amplia, relacionándoles a los procesos de la integración interamericano, latinoamericano, y regional (por ejemplo Andes, Amazonía, Cono Sur). Asimismo, partiendo de las propuestas de la sociedad civil ya formuladas, particularmente las de CAOI, el libro elabora algunas ideas para una posible institucionalidad suramericana Específicamente, el libro argumenta que la integración suramericana debe tener un carácter propio continental incluyendo los pensamientos andino-amazónicos y respetando los derechos humanos y de la naturaleza. En este sentido, se describen los crecientes impactos sociales y ambientales de la Iniciativa para la Integración de la Infraestructura Regional Sudamericana (IIRSA) y se discuten varios hitos importantes referidos a la integración suramericana: por ejemplo la construcción de la Unión de las Naciones Suramericanas (UNASUR), y la construcción del Banco del Sur. Integración es la construcción de múltiples puentes. Por lo tanto adicionalmente se estudian diferentes corrientes políticas y filosóficas que tienen un papel importante en la construcción de la integración suramericana y las posibilidades de seducir a los sectores que tienen diferentes opiniones, para definir como se puede tener una articulación que óptimamente podrá contribuir a una integración suramericana que de un lado promueva acciones económicas, sociales, culturales y ambientales conjuntas a nivel de América del Sur para el bienestar de su población y su naturaleza y de otro lado promueva un papel protagonista de Suramérica en la confrontación de las crisis a nivel global.


Download Full PDF

4 y 5 de Diciembre 2006, store previa a la II Cumbre de de la Comunidad Sudamérica de Naciones, cincuenta lideres y lideresas indígenas de nueve países suramericanos discutieron en Cochabamba sobre la integración suramericana. Posteriormente, del 6 a 9 de Diciembre, y en paralelo a la Cumbre presidencial se organizó la Cumbre Social por la Integración de los Pueblos. La Cumbre Social por la Integración de los Pueblos fue un espacio único de participación y dialogo entre actores gubernamentales y de la sociedad civil. Como resultado, 13 sesiones temáticas formularon propuestas para la institucionalidad de la integración suramericana. Una de estas sesiones fue la Sesión de los Pueblos Indígenas y Naciones Originarios, en la cuál los líderes mencionados anteriormente tuvieron un papel protagonista. Muchos de ellos y ellas forman parte de la Coordinadora Andina de Organizaciones Indígenas (CAOI). Estos eventos y posteriores actividades de la sociedad civil Suramericana dirigidas a “Otra Suramérica posible”, y específicamente las acciones referidas a la integración Suramericana que implementó la CAOI entre el inicio de 2007 y mayo 2009, forman la base de este documento. El libro analiza los procesos de la integración Suramericana desde una perspectiva amplia, relacionándoles a los procesos de la integración interamericano, latinoamericano, y regional (por ejemplo Andes, Amazonía, Cono Sur). Asimismo, partiendo de las propuestas de la sociedad civil ya formuladas, particularmente las de CAOI, el libro elabora algunas ideas para una posible institucionalidad suramericana Específicamente, el libro argumenta que la integración suramericana debe tener un carácter propio continental incluyendo los pensamientos andino-amazónicos y respetando los derechos humanos y de la naturaleza. En este sentido, se describen los crecientes impactos sociales y ambientales de la Iniciativa para la Integración de la Infraestructura Regional Sudamericana (IIRSA) y se discuten varios hitos importantes referidos a la integración suramericana: por ejemplo la construcción de la Unión de las Naciones Suramericanas (UNASUR), y la construcción del Banco del Sur. Integración es la construcción de múltiples puentes. Por lo tanto adicionalmente se estudian diferentes corrientes políticas y filosóficas que tienen un papel importante en la construcción de la integración suramericana y las posibilidades de seducir a los sectores que tienen diferentes opiniones, para definir como se puede tener una articulación que óptimamente podrá contribuir a una integración suramericana que de un lado promueva acciones económicas, sociales, culturales y ambientales conjuntas a nivel de América del Sur para el bienestar de su población y su naturaleza y de otro lado promueva un papel protagonista de Suramérica en la confrontación de las crisis a nivel global.


Download Full PDF

Cochabamba, find 15 al 17 de 2009
Hacia la fundación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del “ALBA – TCP”


Durante muchos años nuestros pueblos y naciones originarias fueron saqueados permanentemente y reducidos a simples colonias por los países más poderosos del mundo, sildenafil quienes en su afán de acumulación de riqueza invadieron nuestros territorios, se adueñaron de nuestras riquezas, culturas, conciencias, enajenando nuestro trabajo y ofendiendo a nuestra madre tierra (pachamama) depredando los recursos que existe en ella en pos de lucro desmedido.
En los 80 una inmensa deuda externa imposible de pagar nos postró aun más en la pobreza y la miseria, volviendo a generarse la violencia institucional que ya se había vivido con la militarización de nuestros pueblos, la desaparición y la tortura de nuestros familiares y el sometimiento de nuestras naciones indígenas originarias campesinas.
A lo anterior, ya en la etapa neoliberal, se añaden en el marco del capitalismo transnacional y globalizado los inhumanos procesos de desnacionalización y la sumisión absoluta de los gobiernos neoliberales a los dictados del Fondo Monetario Internacional y del Banco Mundial.
Todo esto ha hecho que la voluntad popular no signifique nada en el esquema del pensamiento de las transnacionales, de la explotación y el crimen, recordándonos permanentemente que la era de colonización de nuestros pueblos aún no ha terminado.
La intromisión del imperialismo yanqui en la historia de nuestros pueblos como ocurrió con países como Colombia, Haití, México, Puerto Rico, Nicaragua, Argentina, Ecuador, Venezuela, Bolivia, entre otros, con el pretexto de luchar contra el “terrorismo” o el “narcotráfico” ha expoliado nuestros recursos y ha empobrecido a nuestra gente; igual que los colonizadores de la “cruz y la espada” se ha apoderado de nuestras riquezas y ha dañado el medio ambiente.
La desigualdad económica, política y social, al igual que la exclusión y la discriminación son producto del neoliberalismo y el colonialismo de larga data, que debilitaron a los Estados y supeditaron el bienestar de nuestros pueblos a los designios de las organizaciones multinacionales y a los intereses de las empresas trasnacionales. La capacidad destructiva del sistema de dominación imperialista es aterradora, el desempleo aumenta y la esperanza de vida desciende; ellos mismos se encuentran ahora sumidos en una crisis sistémica cuya resolución no puede ser a costa del bienestar de nuestros pueblos.
Los movimientos sociales, expresión de las organizaciones indígenas originarias, afro descendientes, campesinas, organizaciones sindicales, juveniles, gremiales, los maestros, los obreros, los sin tierra, los productores cocaleros, las juntas de vecinos, profesionales progresistas y otros que luchan no solo por reivindicaciones salariales, sino también por la vida y el respeto a la madre tierra, desde antes, y desde siempre fueron los verdaderos artífices de la revolución y de las transformaciones profundas.
No olvidemos que los movimientos sociales hemos jugado un papel central en los últimos años en la perspectiva de una democratización y descolonización profunda de nuestros países, por un cambio sustantivo y genuinamente transformador tanto en lo económico, como en lo superestructural de nuestra Abya Yala.
Recordemos que el 14 de diciembre de 2004, Cuba y Venezuela proponen dar inicio e impulsar el ALBA, como alternativa al ALCA, que permita a nuestros pueblos y naciones avanzar políticamente en la búsqueda de una verdadera y libre integración, basada en la solidaridad, que responda a las necesidades sociales, políticas, educativas, culturales, económicas, reconociendo las luchas históricas de los pueblos latinoamericanos y caribeños por su unidad y soberanía.
En noviembre de 2005, en el marco de la Cumbre de las Américas en Mar del Plata, se da la simbólica derrota del ALCA que fue organizada por la Alianza Social Continental, como aporte a la integración.
Meses después en enero de 2006, en el marco del capítulo del Foro Social Mundial, el Presidente Chávez se reúne con Movimientos Sociales y plantea la necesidad de la creación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del Alba.
El año 2006, en Lima Perú se lleva a cabo la Cumbre Enlazando Alternativas, paralela a la Cumbre de Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de América Latina y la Unión Europea, en la que se avanza en la articulación de los Movimientos Sociales en el marco del proceso de integración latinoamericana.
Más tarde en noviembre del 2006, en la ciudad de Cochabamba, Bolivia, se celebra la Cumbre Social por la integración de los Pueblos, paralela a la Cumbre Presidencial de la Comunidad Suramericana de Naciones (CSN). Fue organizada por la Alianza Social Continental, como aporte a la integración en el marco de una gran movilización de los movimientos sociales, originarios y originarios del país.
En la V Cumbre del ALBA celebrada en abril de 2007 se lanza la declaración de Tintorero donde se aprueba la creación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA.
Después en noviembre de 2007, en la II Reunión de la Comisión Política del ALBA, el Consejo de Ministros decide que cada país miembro debe crear su capítulo nacional en el marco de la conformación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA, y que los integrantes de dicho capítulo acordaran la forma y metodología para el funcionamiento de dicho Consejo, así como la invitación a otros movimientos sociales de países extra-ALBA a participar en el mismo.
En ese mismo año, se expande la Alternativa Bolivariana a partir de la formación de las casas del ALBA a países no integrados al ALBA con la participación de las organizaciones sociales de esos países, entre ellos en Perú.
Posteriormente en enero del año 2008, en Caracas se celebra la VI Cumbre del ALBA, donde se aprueba la estrategia para el Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA, incluyendo sus principios, estructura y funciones, además se acuerda darle continuidad a dos acciones pendientes aprobadas en Tintorero, que son:
– Identificar en el ámbito Latinoamericano y caribeño, organizaciones, redes y campañas sub-regionales y regionales, nacionales y locales, en países extra-ALBA que puedan ser convocadas para formar parte del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales”.
– Realizar reunión constitutiva del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales”.
El complejo proceso de organización de la institucionalidad del ALBA-TCP como mecanismo de integración, las realidades y desafíos que han vivido algunos de los procesos políticos de los países miembros (Bolivia, Venezuela), otras prioridades y esfuerzos dentro del ALBA-TCP y criterios de países miembros han determinado que esta iniciativa esté pospuesta desde esa fecha (Aún en febrero de este año, 2009, la Comisión Política acordó “establecer un plazo a la creación de los capítulos nacionales de movimientos sociales y comunicar a la coordinación permanente del ALBA los detalles al respecto antes de finales de abril de 2009. Ello con el fin de promover la instalación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA el primero de mayo de 2009”).
Y es en este contexto que en julio de 2008 el MST y las organizaciones de la Vía Campesina Brasil, en diálogo con otras organizaciones del continente, convocan a sendos encuentros en la Escuela Nacional Florestán Fernández (MST) con un grupo sustantivo de líderes y operadores políticos de movimientos y organizaciones sociales, para, con todos estos antecedentes, llamar a un proceso de construcción de una articulación hemisférica de movimientos y organizaciones sociales en torno a los principios del ALBA y sus iniciativas. Resultado de esta reunión es la Carta de los Movimientos Sociales de las Américas que fue lanzada en la Asamblea de Movimientos Sociales, en ocasión del III Foro Social de las Américas (Guatemala, octubre 2008).
En enero de 2009, como parte de las actividades del VIII FSM 2009, celebrado en Belem de Pará, Brasil, se reunieron en la Asamblea de Movimientos Sociales, representantes de centenares de organizaciones y movimientos de todos los países de las Américas, que se identifican con el proceso de construcción del ALBA, para aprobar esta carta en su versión definitiva: Carta de los Movimientos Sociales de las Américas. Construyendo la integración de los pueblos desde abajo. Impulsando el ALBA y la solidaridad de los pueblos, frente al proyecto del imperialismo.
Recientemente en septiembre de este año, en Sao Paulo se realiza una Convocatoria a los Movimientos Sociales de Las Américas con el objetivo de articular el proceso de construcción del ALBA a partir de los Movimientos Sociales.
Con este recuento no solo reflejamos el camino recorrido en este proceso de integración hasta la fecha, sino que los alentamos a reflexionar y construir desde nuestra historia común.
En efecto lo que estamos viviendo en América Latina es parte de un proceso abarcador de reapropiación social de nuestro destino, de nuevas formas de organización política, horizontal, de democracia directa y participativa, de una economía plural que recupere los recursos naturales en beneficio de los pueblos, de una construcción de nuevas relaciones sociales armónicas, solidarias y comunitarias de producción.
Ahora con una fuerza inusitada surge en América y el mundo el grito de libertad, de lucha por la recuperación de nuestro territorio, de nuestras libertades, de nuestra soberanía; miles de hermanos se sumaron a la causa revolucionaria para liberar la patria, miles de ellos ofrendaron sus vidas en este intento, en diferentes épocas y de diferentes maneras, mártires de la revolución fueron los Tupac Katari, Tupac Amaru, Bartolina Sisa, Manuela Saenz, Apiaguayki Tumpa, Juana Azurduy de Padilla, Santos Pariamo, Marcelo Quiroga Santa Cruz, Inti Peredo, Lempira el héroe de la revolución hondureña, el libertador Simón Bolívar, Augusto Cesar Sandino, José Martí, Ernesto Che Guevara, Salvador Allende. Luis Espinal y actualmente los cinco patriotas cubanos que purgan condenas perpetúas por el solo hecho de luchar contra el terrorismo, contra el imperialismo.
Esta Primera Cumbre del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales en el marco del ALBA-TCP, es una Cumbre histórica que permite la participación directa de los movimientos sociales en los diferentes medios de cooperación y solidaridad, a diferencia de otros mecanismos de integración de países, que nunca han considerado la participación plena de los pueblos y naciones, limitándose a meros intercambios de intereses mercantilistas que van en contra de la integración y reciprocidad de pueblos y naciones de la gran Abya Yala (latinoamericana).
En este contexto la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América y el Caribe, se constituye en un verdadero espacio de construcción de una nueva patria latinoamericana, portando la bandera de la humanidad por su definitiva emancipación. Por eso estamos dispuestos a combatir contra la explotación del hombre por el hombre, considerando que existe la latente necesidad de una “segunda independencia”.
Ésta Cumbre Internacional, es el saludo de los Movimientos Sociales de los países miembros del ALBA-TCP, a la VII Cumbre de Presidentes de la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América – Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos, que durante media década lucha por la desaparición de toda forma de dominación y explotación contra los pueblos y la construcción de relaciones de complementariedad y ayuda recíproca en procura de su desarrollo y de lograr el buen vivir.
Aquí, desde el corazón de Sudamérica, desde los pueblos combatientes, las organizaciones indígenas originarios campesinas, obreros, trabajadores, estudiantes, clase media y profesionales comprometidos con su pueblo de Venezuela, Cuba, Bolivia, Antigua y Barbuda, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Honduras, la Mancomunidad de Domínica, San Vicente y las Granadinas, aunados en el Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP, nos comprometemos a defender los principios revolucionarios del ALBA-TCP, que potencian la lucha y la resistencia contra todo tipo de explotación para construir un mundo diferente.
Nuestro objetivo como Consejo de Movimientos Sociales de los países miembros del ALBA-TCP, es la lucha por el pluralismo en nuestros países y en el mundo entero, sustentada en la armonía entre nuestros pueblos y la madre tierra para el buen vivir, en los principios morales, éticos, políticos y económicos de nuestras comunidades y barrios del campo y la ciudad. Pretendemos forjar desde el seno del pueblo una nueva Patria Social Comunitaria, descolonizada y fundada en la multidiversidad, respetuosa de las diferencias y de las particularidades sociales y regionales.
La actuación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales, estará fundamentada en los siguientes principios:
– Es un espacio inclusivo, abierto, diverso y plural, a partir de la identificación con los objetivos y principios del ALBA-TCP.
– Es un espacio para compartir y desarrollar agendas comunes que beneficien a los pueblos, sin convertirnos en un espacio para dirimir disputas y representaciones políticas.
– Es un espacio para fortalecer posiciones políticas económicas y sociales, sin convertirnos en un foro o asamblea de actuación social, que reconoce los espacios de articulación existentes.
– Significa el compromiso de la plena identificación con los principios generales que definen el ALBA-TCP como proceso de integración.
– Expresa la legitimidad y representación real de los Movimientos Sociales que se integran.
– En países miembros, sostener permanente diálogo e interrelación con sus respectivos gobiernos.
– Cada Coordinación Nacional en los países miembros del ALBA-TCP, definirá sus propias dinámicas de actuación y de relacionamiento con sus gobiernos.
– En países miembros del ALBA-TCP, los vínculos de las organizaciones sociales con el CMS, se desarrollará a través de las Coordinaciones Nacionales.
– Integrar el enfoque de género, reconociendo el legítimo derecho de la participación de la mujer en los movimientos sociales con equidad, igualdad real y justicia social.
Los pueblos de América Latina que pertenecemos a la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América Latina y el Caribe – Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos, organizados en este Consejo, continuaremos luchando contra los constantes intentos del imperialismo norteamericano de privarnos del desarrollo económico pleno; ni los ataques, amedrentamientos, armas, utilización de la violencia podrán callarnos, seguiremos luchando y siendo solidarios ahora particularmente con el pueblo hermano de Honduras.
Estamos convencidos de que sólo con la organización, movilización y la unidad de los pueblos del ALBA-TCP, es posible un auténtico proceso de integración, como también el logro de la transformación económica, social, política y cultural de nuestros países.
Esta Cumbre reafirma la voluntad de Bolivia, Venezuela, Cuba, Antigua y Barbuda, San Vicente y las Granadinas, Nicaragua, Honduras, Ecuador y la Mancomunidad de Dominica por el desarrollo y el fortalecimiento del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales sobre la base de una solidaridad comprometida con los demás pueblos del continente; optamos por la lucha plural, democrática, antifascista y antiimperialista, a través de un trabajo con objetivos políticos que no escondan su naturaleza ni su carácter revolucionario.
La conformación de este Consejo de Movimientos Sociales nos permite salir de las luchas locales y aisladas, de nuestras fronteras nacionales para integrarnos en la dimensión del AbyaYala o patria latinoamericana, permite la complementariedad y participación de los pueblos en los diferentes Consejos y Grupos de Trabajo que son las instancias de unificación que funcionan en el marco de la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América Latina y el Caribe.
Para lo cual se conforma un comité ad hoc, que coordinara Bolivia, y será integrado por un representante de los tres capítulos nacionales ya creados (Bolivia, Venezuela y Cuba) y otras importantes organizaciones, redes y campañas para impulsar el proceso de constitución del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP en seis meses.
Es dado en la ciudad de Cochabamba, a los 16 días del mes octubre de 2009.
______________________________
PROPUESTA DE ACCION
– Consolidación de los capítulos nacionales con organizaciones representativas de los movimientos sociales.
– Incorporar a los movimientos sociales de los países del ALBA en el Exterior. Así como organizaciones sociales presentes en los países Miembros del ALBA.
– Crear espacios de discusión para evaluar actividades de los movimientos sociales y desarrollar programas comunes.
– Que los movimientos sociales realicen actividades de solidaridad de manera conjunta.
– Saludamos las iniciativas de Vía Campesina, MST y otras organizaciones, propuestas en septiembre de 2009 en Sao Paulo, en la perspectiva de fortalecer la articulación de los movimientos sociales del continente. En específico, nos sumamos a la iniciativa de la realización de una Asamblea Continental de Movimientos Sociales con el ALBA, para el primer semestre del 2010.
– Fortalecer los programas de desarrollo, participación y asistencia a través de los movimientos sociales.
– Asignación presupuestaria a los movimientos sociales
– Privilegiar el proceso de participación de la mujer en la dirección de los movimientos sociales.
– Incorporación de manera progresiva a organizaciones comunitarias pequeñas con igualdad de derecho de participación.
– Luchar por los derechos de los inmigrantes a un trabajo digno y a la salud.
– Impulsar la participación de los movimientos sociales de los países cuyos gobiernos no son integrantes formales del ALBA como forma de globalizar la lucha.
– Los programas de los movimientos sociales deben ser entregados a los Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de los Países del ALBA a través de resoluciones para su aprobación.
– Los “10 mandamientos para salvar la vida y el planeta, la humanidad y la vida” propuesto por el Presidente Evo Morales deben ser adoptados como principios fundamentales de los movimientos sociales.
– Cada capítulo nacional debe establecer sus programas que respondan a las necesidades reales de los pueblos.
– Establecer mecanismos de comunicación permanente entre los movimientos sociales y los pueblos y naciones indígenas originarias campesinas, donde se compartan las experiencias del proceso en cada país.
– Desarrollar programas de formación para los voceros de los movimientos sociales.
– Crear una red de medios de comunicación e información propios de los movimientos sociales.
– Luchar y demandar el derecho de los pueblos a la paz y a su autodeterminación.
– Invitar a las Nacionalidades y pueblos indígenas; a las comunidades del campo y de la ciudad; a las organizaciones populares; a los medios y redes de comunicación comunitaria y masiva; a todos y todas los habitantes del mundo, a difundir, denunciar y condenar en sus espacios; las estrategias de intervención de los Estados Unidos, a través de bases militares en Colombia, en la región, y el resto del mundo.
– Impulsar campañas en contra de las empresas transnacionales e impulsar proyectos gran nacionales promovidos por los gobiernos del ALBA A TRAVES DEL TRATADO DE COMERCIO DE LOS PUEBLOS.
– Apoyar la adopción de una moneda internacional, promovidos por los países del ALBA y la UNASUR.
– Estimular las luchas sociales para el re-ascenso del movimiento de masas.
Para lo cual se conforma un comité ad hoc, que coordinara Bolivia, y será integrado por un representante de los tres capítulos nacionales ya creados (Bolivia, Venezuela y Cuba) y otras importantes organizaciones, redes y campañas para impulsar el proceso de constitución del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP en seis meses

Conferencia Internacional de gobiernos y movimientos sociales “Integración regional: una oportunidad frente a las crisis” (21 y 22 Julio 2009, Asunción, Paraguay)

Durante muchos años nuestros pueblos y naciones originarias fueron saqueados permanentemente y reducidos a simples colonias por los países más poderosos del mundo, search quienes en su afán de acumulación de riqueza invadieron nuestros territorios, ailment se adueñaron de nuestras riquezas, stuff culturas, conciencias, enajenando nuestro trabajo y ofendiendo a nuestra madre tierra (pachamama) depredando los recursos que existe en ella en pos de lucro desmedido.
En los 80 una inmensa deuda externa imposible de pagar nos postró aun más en la pobreza y la miseria, volviendo a generarse la violencia institucional que ya se había vivido con la militarización de nuestros pueblos, la desaparición y la tortura de nuestros familiares y el sometimiento de nuestras naciones indígenas originarias campesinas.
A lo anterior, ya en la etapa neoliberal, se añaden en el marco del capitalismo transnacional y globalizado los inhumanos procesos de desnacionalización y la sumisión absoluta de los gobiernos neoliberales a los dictados del Fondo Monetario Internacional y del Banco Mundial.
Todo esto ha hecho que la voluntad popular no signifique nada en el esquema del pensamiento de las transnacionales, de la explotación y el crimen, recordándonos permanentemente que la era de colonización de nuestros pueblos aún no ha terminado.
La intromisión del imperialismo yanqui en la historia de nuestros pueblos como ocurrió con países como Colombia, Haití, México, Puerto Rico, Nicaragua, Argentina, Ecuador, Venezuela, Bolivia, entre otros, con el pretexto de luchar contra el “terrorismo” o el “narcotráfico” ha expoliado nuestros recursos y ha empobrecido a nuestra gente; igual que los colonizadores de la “cruz y la espada” se ha apoderado de nuestras riquezas y ha dañado el medio ambiente.
La desigualdad económica, política y social, al igual que la exclusión y la discriminación son producto del neoliberalismo y el colonialismo de larga data, que debilitaron a los Estados y supeditaron el bienestar de nuestros pueblos a los designios de las organizaciones multinacionales y a los intereses de las empresas trasnacionales. La capacidad destructiva del sistema de dominación imperialista es aterradora, el desempleo aumenta y la esperanza de vida desciende; ellos mismos se encuentran ahora sumidos en una crisis sistémica cuya resolución no puede ser a costa del bienestar de nuestros pueblos.
Los movimientos sociales, expresión de las organizaciones indígenas originarias, afro descendientes, campesinas, organizaciones sindicales, juveniles, gremiales, los maestros, los obreros, los sin tierra, los productores cocaleros, las juntas de vecinos, profesionales progresistas y otros que luchan no solo por reivindicaciones salariales, sino también por la vida y el respeto a la madre tierra, desde antes, y desde siempre fueron los verdaderos artífices de la revolución y de las transformaciones profundas.
No olvidemos que los movimientos sociales hemos jugado un papel central en los últimos años en la perspectiva de una democratización y descolonización profunda de nuestros países, por un cambio sustantivo y genuinamente transformador tanto en lo económico, como en lo superestructural de nuestra Abya Yala.
Recordemos que el 14 de diciembre de 2004, Cuba y Venezuela proponen dar inicio e impulsar el ALBA, como alternativa al ALCA, que permita a nuestros pueblos y naciones avanzar políticamente en la búsqueda de una verdadera y libre integración, basada en la solidaridad, que responda a las necesidades sociales, políticas, educativas, culturales, económicas, reconociendo las luchas históricas de los pueblos latinoamericanos y caribeños por su unidad y soberanía.
En noviembre de 2005, en el marco de la Cumbre de las Américas en Mar del Plata, se da la simbólica derrota del ALCA que fue organizada por la Alianza Social Continental, como aporte a la integración.
Meses después en enero de 2006, en el marco del capítulo del Foro Social Mundial, el Presidente Chávez se reúne con Movimientos Sociales y plantea la necesidad de la creación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del Alba.
El año 2006, en Lima Perú se lleva a cabo la Cumbre Enlazando Alternativas, paralela a la Cumbre de Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de América Latina y la Unión Europea, en la que se avanza en la articulación de los Movimientos Sociales en el marco del proceso de integración latinoamericana.
Más tarde en noviembre del 2006, en la ciudad de Cochabamba, Bolivia, se celebra la Cumbre Social por la integración de los Pueblos, paralela a la Cumbre Presidencial de la Comunidad Suramericana de Naciones (CSN). Fue organizada por la Alianza Social Continental, como aporte a la integración en el marco de una gran movilización de los movimientos sociales, originarios y originarios del país.
En la V Cumbre del ALBA celebrada en abril de 2007 se lanza la declaración de Tintorero donde se aprueba la creación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA.
Después en noviembre de 2007, en la II Reunión de la Comisión Política del ALBA, el Consejo de Ministros decide que cada país miembro debe crear su capítulo nacional en el marco de la conformación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA, y que los integrantes de dicho capítulo acordaran la forma y metodología para el funcionamiento de dicho Consejo, así como la invitación a otros movimientos sociales de países extra-ALBA a participar en el mismo.
En ese mismo año, se expande la Alternativa Bolivariana a partir de la formación de las casas del ALBA a países no integrados al ALBA con la participación de las organizaciones sociales de esos países, entre ellos en Perú.
Posteriormente en enero del año 2008, en Caracas se celebra la VI Cumbre del ALBA, donde se aprueba la estrategia para el Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA, incluyendo sus principios, estructura y funciones, además se acuerda darle continuidad a dos acciones pendientes aprobadas en Tintorero, que son:
– Identificar en el ámbito Latinoamericano y caribeño, organizaciones, redes y campañas sub-regionales y regionales, nacionales y locales, en países extra-ALBA que puedan ser convocadas para formar parte del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales”.
– Realizar reunión constitutiva del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales”.
El complejo proceso de organización de la institucionalidad del ALBA-TCP como mecanismo de integración, las realidades y desafíos que han vivido algunos de los procesos políticos de los países miembros (Bolivia, Venezuela), otras prioridades y esfuerzos dentro del ALBA-TCP y criterios de países miembros han determinado que esta iniciativa esté pospuesta desde esa fecha (Aún en febrero de este año, 2009, la Comisión Política acordó “establecer un plazo a la creación de los capítulos nacionales de movimientos sociales y comunicar a la coordinación permanente del ALBA los detalles al respecto antes de finales de abril de 2009. Ello con el fin de promover la instalación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA el primero de mayo de 2009”).
Y es en este contexto que en julio de 2008 el MST y las organizaciones de la Vía Campesina Brasil, en diálogo con otras organizaciones del continente, convocan a sendos encuentros en la Escuela Nacional Florestán Fernández (MST) con un grupo sustantivo de líderes y operadores políticos de movimientos y organizaciones sociales, para, con todos estos antecedentes, llamar a un proceso de construcción de una articulación hemisférica de movimientos y organizaciones sociales en torno a los principios del ALBA y sus iniciativas. Resultado de esta reunión es la Carta de los Movimientos Sociales de las Américas que fue lanzada en la Asamblea de Movimientos Sociales, en ocasión del III Foro Social de las Américas (Guatemala, octubre 2008).
En enero de 2009, como parte de las actividades del VIII FSM 2009, celebrado en Belem de Pará, Brasil, se reunieron en la Asamblea de Movimientos Sociales, representantes de centenares de organizaciones y movimientos de todos los países de las Américas, que se identifican con el proceso de construcción del ALBA, para aprobar esta carta en su versión definitiva: Carta de los Movimientos Sociales de las Américas. Construyendo la integración de los pueblos desde abajo. Impulsando el ALBA y la solidaridad de los pueblos, frente al proyecto del imperialismo.
Recientemente en septiembre de este año, en Sao Paulo se realiza una Convocatoria a los Movimientos Sociales de Las Américas con el objetivo de articular el proceso de construcción del ALBA a partir de los Movimientos Sociales.
Con este recuento no solo reflejamos el camino recorrido en este proceso de integración hasta la fecha, sino que los alentamos a reflexionar y construir desde nuestra historia común.
En efecto lo que estamos viviendo en América Latina es parte de un proceso abarcador de reapropiación social de nuestro destino, de nuevas formas de organización política, horizontal, de democracia directa y participativa, de una economía plural que recupere los recursos naturales en beneficio de los pueblos, de una construcción de nuevas relaciones sociales armónicas, solidarias y comunitarias de producción.
Ahora con una fuerza inusitada surge en América y el mundo el grito de libertad, de lucha por la recuperación de nuestro territorio, de nuestras libertades, de nuestra soberanía; miles de hermanos se sumaron a la causa revolucionaria para liberar la patria, miles de ellos ofrendaron sus vidas en este intento, en diferentes épocas y de diferentes maneras, mártires de la revolución fueron los Tupac Katari, Tupac Amaru, Bartolina Sisa, Manuela Saenz, Apiaguayki Tumpa, Juana Azurduy de Padilla, Santos Pariamo, Marcelo Quiroga Santa Cruz, Inti Peredo, Lempira el héroe de la revolución hondureña, el libertador Simón Bolívar, Augusto Cesar Sandino, José Martí, Ernesto Che Guevara, Salvador Allende. Luis Espinal y actualmente los cinco patriotas cubanos que purgan condenas perpetúas por el solo hecho de luchar contra el terrorismo, contra el imperialismo.
Esta Primera Cumbre del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales en el marco del ALBA-TCP, es una Cumbre histórica que permite la participación directa de los movimientos sociales en los diferentes medios de cooperación y solidaridad, a diferencia de otros mecanismos de integración de países, que nunca han considerado la participación plena de los pueblos y naciones, limitándose a meros intercambios de intereses mercantilistas que van en contra de la integración y reciprocidad de pueblos y naciones de la gran Abya Yala (latinoamericana).
En este contexto la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América y el Caribe, se constituye en un verdadero espacio de construcción de una nueva patria latinoamericana, portando la bandera de la humanidad por su definitiva emancipación. Por eso estamos dispuestos a combatir contra la explotación del hombre por el hombre, considerando que existe la latente necesidad de una “segunda independencia”.
Ésta Cumbre Internacional, es el saludo de los Movimientos Sociales de los países miembros del ALBA-TCP, a la VII Cumbre de Presidentes de la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América – Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos, que durante media década lucha por la desaparición de toda forma de dominación y explotación contra los pueblos y la construcción de relaciones de complementariedad y ayuda recíproca en procura de su desarrollo y de lograr el buen vivir.
Aquí, desde el corazón de Sudamérica, desde los pueblos combatientes, las organizaciones indígenas originarios campesinas, obreros, trabajadores, estudiantes, clase media y profesionales comprometidos con su pueblo de Venezuela, Cuba, Bolivia, Antigua y Barbuda, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Honduras, la Mancomunidad de Domínica, San Vicente y las Granadinas, aunados en el Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP, nos comprometemos a defender los principios revolucionarios del ALBA-TCP, que potencian la lucha y la resistencia contra todo tipo de explotación para construir un mundo diferente.
Nuestro objetivo como Consejo de Movimientos Sociales de los países miembros del ALBA-TCP, es la lucha por el pluralismo en nuestros países y en el mundo entero, sustentada en la armonía entre nuestros pueblos y la madre tierra para el buen vivir, en los principios morales, éticos, políticos y económicos de nuestras comunidades y barrios del campo y la ciudad. Pretendemos forjar desde el seno del pueblo una nueva Patria Social Comunitaria, descolonizada y fundada en la multidiversidad, respetuosa de las diferencias y de las particularidades sociales y regionales.
La actuación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales, estará fundamentada en los siguientes principios:
– Es un espacio inclusivo, abierto, diverso y plural, a partir de la identificación con los objetivos y principios del ALBA-TCP.
– Es un espacio para compartir y desarrollar agendas comunes que beneficien a los pueblos, sin convertirnos en un espacio para dirimir disputas y representaciones políticas.
– Es un espacio para fortalecer posiciones políticas económicas y sociales, sin convertirnos en un foro o asamblea de actuación social, que reconoce los espacios de articulación existentes.
– Significa el compromiso de la plena identificación con los principios generales que definen el ALBA-TCP como proceso de integración.
– Expresa la legitimidad y representación real de los Movimientos Sociales que se integran.
– En países miembros, sostener permanente diálogo e interrelación con sus respectivos gobiernos.
– Cada Coordinación Nacional en los países miembros del ALBA-TCP, definirá sus propias dinámicas de actuación y de relacionamiento con sus gobiernos.
– En países miembros del ALBA-TCP, los vínculos de las organizaciones sociales con el CMS, se desarrollará a través de las Coordinaciones Nacionales.
– Integrar el enfoque de género, reconociendo el legítimo derecho de la participación de la mujer en los movimientos sociales con equidad, igualdad real y justicia social.
Los pueblos de América Latina que pertenecemos a la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América Latina y el Caribe – Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos, organizados en este Consejo, continuaremos luchando contra los constantes intentos del imperialismo norteamericano de privarnos del desarrollo económico pleno; ni los ataques, amedrentamientos, armas, utilización de la violencia podrán callarnos, seguiremos luchando y siendo solidarios ahora particularmente con el pueblo hermano de Honduras.
Estamos convencidos de que sólo con la organización, movilización y la unidad de los pueblos del ALBA-TCP, es posible un auténtico proceso de integración, como también el logro de la transformación económica, social, política y cultural de nuestros países.
Esta Cumbre reafirma la voluntad de Bolivia, Venezuela, Cuba, Antigua y Barbuda, San Vicente y las Granadinas, Nicaragua, Honduras, Ecuador y la Mancomunidad de Dominica por el desarrollo y el fortalecimiento del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales sobre la base de una solidaridad comprometida con los demás pueblos del continente; optamos por la lucha plural, democrática, antifascista y antiimperialista, a través de un trabajo con objetivos políticos que no escondan su naturaleza ni su carácter revolucionario.
La conformación de este Consejo de Movimientos Sociales nos permite salir de las luchas locales y aisladas, de nuestras fronteras nacionales para integrarnos en la dimensión del AbyaYala o patria latinoamericana, permite la complementariedad y participación de los pueblos en los diferentes Consejos y Grupos de Trabajo que son las instancias de unificación que funcionan en el marco de la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América Latina y el Caribe.
Para lo cual se conforma un comité ad hoc, que coordinara Bolivia, y será integrado por un representante de los tres capítulos nacionales ya creados (Bolivia, Venezuela y Cuba) y otras importantes organizaciones, redes y campañas para impulsar el proceso de constitución del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP en seis meses.
Es dado en la ciudad de Cochabamba, a los 16 días del mes octubre de 2009.
______________________________
PROPUESTA DE ACCION
– Consolidación de los capítulos nacionales con organizaciones representativas de los movimientos sociales.
– Incorporar a los movimientos sociales de los países del ALBA en el Exterior. Así como organizaciones sociales presentes en los países Miembros del ALBA.
– Crear espacios de discusión para evaluar actividades de los movimientos sociales y desarrollar programas comunes.
– Que los movimientos sociales realicen actividades de solidaridad de manera conjunta.
– Saludamos las iniciativas de Vía Campesina, MST y otras organizaciones, propuestas en septiembre de 2009 en Sao Paulo, en la perspectiva de fortalecer la articulación de los movimientos sociales del continente. En específico, nos sumamos a la iniciativa de la realización de una Asamblea Continental de Movimientos Sociales con el ALBA, para el primer semestre del 2010.
– Fortalecer los programas de desarrollo, participación y asistencia a través de los movimientos sociales.
– Asignación presupuestaria a los movimientos sociales
– Privilegiar el proceso de participación de la mujer en la dirección de los movimientos sociales.
– Incorporación de manera progresiva a organizaciones comunitarias pequeñas con igualdad de derecho de participación.
– Luchar por los derechos de los inmigrantes a un trabajo digno y a la salud.
– Impulsar la participación de los movimientos sociales de los países cuyos gobiernos no son integrantes formales del ALBA como forma de globalizar la lucha.
– Los programas de los movimientos sociales deben ser entregados a los Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de los Países del ALBA a través de resoluciones para su aprobación.
– Los “10 mandamientos para salvar la vida y el planeta, la humanidad y la vida” propuesto por el Presidente Evo Morales deben ser adoptados como principios fundamentales de los movimientos sociales.
– Cada capítulo nacional debe establecer sus programas que respondan a las necesidades reales de los pueblos.
– Establecer mecanismos de comunicación permanente entre los movimientos sociales y los pueblos y naciones indígenas originarias campesinas, donde se compartan las experiencias del proceso en cada país.
– Desarrollar programas de formación para los voceros de los movimientos sociales.
– Crear una red de medios de comunicación e información propios de los movimientos sociales.
– Luchar y demandar el derecho de los pueblos a la paz y a su autodeterminación.
– Invitar a las Nacionalidades y pueblos indígenas; a las comunidades del campo y de la ciudad; a las organizaciones populares; a los medios y redes de comunicación comunitaria y masiva; a todos y todas los habitantes del mundo, a difundir, denunciar y condenar en sus espacios; las estrategias de intervención de los Estados Unidos, a través de bases militares en Colombia, en la región, y el resto del mundo.
– Impulsar campañas en contra de las empresas transnacionales e impulsar proyectos gran nacionales promovidos por los gobiernos del ALBA A TRAVES DEL TRATADO DE COMERCIO DE LOS PUEBLOS.
– Apoyar la adopción de una moneda internacional, promovidos por los países del ALBA y la UNASUR.
– Estimular las luchas sociales para el re-ascenso del movimiento de masas.
Para lo cual se conforma un comité ad hoc, que coordinara Bolivia, y será integrado por un representante de los tres capítulos nacionales ya creados (Bolivia, Venezuela y Cuba) y otras importantes organizaciones, redes y campañas para impulsar el proceso de constitución del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP en seis meses

(Cochabamba, search Bolivia– 17 de Octubre de 2009)

Nosotros, cure los Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de los países miembros de la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América – Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos (ALBA – TCP), mind en ocasión de la VII Cumbre en la ciudad de Cochabamba, Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia, el 17 de octubre de 2009.
Teniendo presente las aspiraciones de independencia de los pueblos americanos, desde la resistencia indígena a los conquistadores emprendida por Tupaj Amaru, Tupaj Katari, Guacaipuro, Diriangén y Miskut, pasando por nuestros próceres Eugenio Espejo, Francisco de Miranda, Simón Bolívar, Antonio José de Sucre, Francisco Morazán, José Martí, Eloy Alfaro Delgado y Augusto C. Sandino, hasta nuestros días, en que los pueblos de América Latina y el Caribe se levantan recogiendo las banderas de libertad y justicia de los que nos antecedieron.
Reafirmando nuestro compromiso de continuar con el legado histórico de nuestros libertadores, de avanzar en la unión de los pueblos de nuestra América para la construcción de la Patria Grande como único camino para garantizar la verdadera independencia.
Recordando que las políticas de carácter neoliberal aplicadas en América Latina y el Caribe han generado la exclusión de las mayorías populares en la satisfacción de sus necesidades y han profundizado la desigualdad y la pobreza en la región, beneficiando exclusivamente a los agentes económicos transnacionales y a los grandes monopolios.
Reivindicando los procesos revolucionarios y de liberación expresados en la decisión firme de los pueblos de nuestra América, de romper con los esquemas hegemónicos y de superar el modelo neoliberal y sus efectos en la región que implica terminar con la lógica de la acumulación, el lucro, la ganancia, la competencia y la especulación financiera, así como avanzar en la construcción de un proyecto alternativo basado en los principios de solidaridad, cooperación, complementariedad y respeto a la soberanía y a la autodeterminación de los pueblos.
Condenando el propósito imperialista y neocolonialista que pretende prolongar el modelo de dominación política, económica y militar sobre nuestro continente y mantener, así, una relación histórica de explotación y dependencia, utilizando los instrumentos del libre comercio para la expansión y profundización de la hegemonía capitalista que conduce a la exaltación de la riqueza privada como motor de la dinámica social, y la pérdida de la noción de lo público, lo social y lo humano.
Constatando que es cada vez más necesario implementar políticas que incentiven el intercambio comercial como instrumento de unión de los pueblos asociado al desarrollo productivo entre nuestros países, identificando nuevos esquemas y mecanismos de intercambio económico, así como nuevos actores para el beneficio de las mayorías excluidas.
Reafirmando que es esencial impulsar el desarrollo integral socioproductivo respetando los Derechos de la Madre Tierra y contribuir decididamente a darle solución a la desigualdad y pobreza de nuestros pueblos.
Convencidos de que el modelo neoliberal expresado en los TLCs se encuentran al servicio de las transnacionales y los países ricos, obligando a los países a modificar su marco jurídico violando la soberanía de nuestros pueblos y promoviendo la privatización de los sectores estratégicos de la economía y los servicios básicos (agua, educación, salud, transporte, comunicaciones y energía), ocasionando la reducción del tamaño del Estado y limitando la regulación del mismo, a nivel de la participación accionaria, la reinversión de utilidades, la transferencia de ganancias, buscando abrir las compras públicas de los países en desarrollo a favor de las transnacionales, impulsando su dominio y la penetración en nuestras economías.
Reafirmando que los TLCs profundizan las desigualdades comerciales exaltando la competencia entre las empresas y países desigualmente desarrollados, buscando que los países pobres sigan siendo mono productores y mono exportadores, liberalizando sus mercados mediante la desgravación arancelaria total con el falso argumento de lograr el libre acceso recíproco a los mercados, ocultando los subsidios internos del norte y la gran desproporción entre la oferta exportable de los países desarrollados y los países en desarrollo.
Ratificando que los TLCs permiten que las transnacionales se apropien de los recursos naturales de nuestros pueblos, reduciendo a la humanidad a simples consumidores ampliando los mercados de las transnacionales considerando además a los alimentos como una simple mercancía.
Así mismo los TLCs promueven el patentamiento de la biodiversidad y el genoma humano, buscando ampliar la duración de las patentes de invenciones fundamentales para la salud humana.
Constatando que la crisis ha instalado de manera estructural distorsiones colosales en los mecanismos básicos de funcionamiento de los mercados y la formación de precios en los mercados internacionales a través de la inyección de miles de millones de dólares en juegos especulativos en los mercados cambiarios y en los mercados intermedios y futuros de bienes, por lo que se vuelve indispensable buscar mecanismos institucionales que recuperen la coherencia productiva y garanticen las condiciones básicas de seguridad y soberanía en los planos de alimentación, energía y cuidado de la salud, principalmente.
Definimos que los Principios Fundamentales que regirán el Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos (TCP) de nuestra Alianza, serán los siguientes:
1. Comercio con complementariedad, solidaridad y cooperación, para que juntos alcancemos una vida digna y el vivir bien, promoviendo reglas comerciales y de cooperación para el bienestar de la gente y en particular de los sectores mas desfavorecidos.
2.- Comercio soberano, sin condicionamientos ni intromisión en asuntos internos, respetando las constituciones políticas y las leyes de los Estados, sin obligarlos a aceptar condiciones, normas o compromisos.
3. Comercio complementario y solidario entre los pueblos, las naciones y sus empresas. El desarrollo de la complementación socioproductiva sobre bases de cooperación, aprovechamiento de capacidades y potencialidades existentes en los países, el ahorro de recursos y la creación de empleos. La búsqueda de la complementariedad, la cooperación y la solidaridad entre los diferentes países. El intercambio, la cooperación y la colaboración científico-técnica constantes como una forma de desarrollo, teniendo en consideración las fortalezas de los miembros en áreas específicas, con miras a constituir una masa crítica en el campo de la innovación, la ciencia y la tecnología.
4. Protección de la producción de interés nacional, para el desarrollo integral de todos los pueblos y naciones. Todos los países pueden industrializarse y diversificar su producción para un crecimiento integral de todos los sectores de su economía. El rechazo a la premisa de “exportar o morir” y el cuestionamiento del modelo de desarrollo basado en enclaves exportadores. El privilegio de la producción y el mercado nacional que impulsa la satisfacción de las necesidades de la población a través de los factores de producción internos, importando lo que es necesario y exportando los excedentes de forma complementaria.
5. El trato solidario para las economías más débiles. Cooperación y apoyo incondicional, con el fin de que alcancen un nivel de desarrollo sostenible, que permita alcanzar la suprema felicidad social.
Mientras los TLCs imponen reglas iguales y reciprocas para grandes y chicos, el TCP plantea un comercio que reconozca las diferencias entre los distintos países a través de reglas que favorezcan a las economías más pequeñas.
6. El reconocimiento del papel de los Estados soberanos en el desarrollo socio-económico, la regulación de la economía. A diferencia de los TLCs que persiguen la privatización de los diferentes sectores de la economía y el achicamiento del Estado, el TCP busca fortalecer al Estado como actor central de la economía de un país a todos los niveles enfrentando las prácticas privadas contrarias al interés público, tales como el monopolio, el oligopolio, la cartelización, acaparamiento, especulación y usura. El TCP apoya la nacionalización y la recuperación de las empresas y recursos naturales a los que tienen derecho los pueblos estableciendo mecanismos de defensa legal de los mismos.
7. Promoción de la armonía entre el hombre y la naturaleza, respetando los Derechos de la Madre Tierra y promoviendo un crecimiento económico en armonía con la naturaleza. Se reconoce los Derechos de la Madre Tierra y se impulsa la sostenibilidad en armonía con la naturaleza
8. La contribución del comercio y las inversiones al fortalecimiento de la identidad cultural e histórica de nuestros pueblos. Mientras los TLCs buscan convertir a toda la humanidad en simple consumidores homogenizando los patrones de consumo para ampliar así los mercados de las transnacionales, el TCP impulsa la diversidad de expresiones culturales en el comercio.
9. El favorecimiento a las comunidades, comunas, cooperativas, empresas de producción social, pequeñas y medianas empresas. La promoción conjunta hacia otros mercados de exportaciones de nuestros países y de producciones que resulten de acciones de complementación productiva.
10. El desarrollo de la soberanía y seguridad alimentaría de los países miembros en función de asegurar una alimentación con cantidad y calidad social e integral para nuestros pueblos. Apoyo a las políticas y la producción nacional de alimentos para garantizar el acceso de la población a una alimentación de cantidad y calidad adecuadas.
11. Comercio con políticas arancelarias ajustadas a los requerimientos de los países en desarrollo. La eliminación entre nuestros países de todas las barreras que constituyan un obstáculo a la complementación, permitiendo a los países subir sus aranceles para proteger a sus industrias nacientes o cuando consideren necesario para su desarrollo interno y el bienestar de su población con el fin de promover una mayor integración entre nuestros pueblos. Desgravaciones arancelarias asimétricas y no reciprocas que permiten a los países menos desarrollados subir sus aranceles para proteger a sus industrias nacientes o cuando consideren necesario para su desarrollo interno y el bienestar de su población.
12. Comercio protegiendo a los servicios básicos como derechos humanos. El reconocimiento del derecho soberano de los países al control de sus servicios según sus prioridades de desarrollo nacional y proveer de servicios básicos y estratégicos directamente a través del Estado o en inversiones mixtas con los países socios.
En oposición al TLC que promueve la privatización de los servicios básicos del agua, la educación, la salud, el transporte, las comunicaciones y la energía, el TCP promueve y fortalece el rol del Estado en estos servicios esenciales que hacen al pleno cumplimiento de los derechos humanos.
13. Cooperación para el desarrollo de los diferentes sectores de servicios. Prioridad a la cooperación dirigida al desarrollo de capacidades estructurales de los países, buscando soluciones sociales en sectores como la salud y la educación, entre otros. Reconocimiento del derecho soberano de los países al control y la regulación de todos los sectores de servicios buscando promover a sus empresas de servicios nacionales. Promoción de la cooperación entre países para el desarrollo de los diferentes sectores de servicios antes que el impulso a la libre competencia desleal entre empresas de servicios de diferente escala.
14. Respeto y cooperación a través de las Compras Públicas. Las compras públicas son una herramienta de planificación para el desarrollo y de promoción de la producción nacional que debe ser fortalecida a través de la cooperación participación y la ejecución conjunta de compras cuando resulte conveniente.
15. Ejecución de inversiones conjuntas en materia comercial que puedan adoptar la forma de empresas grannacionales. La asociación de empresas estatales de diferentes países para impulsar un desarrollo soberano y de beneficio mutuo.
16. Socios y no patrones La exigencia a que la inversión extranjera respete las leyes nacionales. A diferencia de los TLCs que imponen una serie de ventajas y garantías a favor de las transnacionales, el TCP busca una inversión extranjera que respete las leyes, reinvierta las utilidades y resuelva cualquier controversia con el Estado al igual que cualquier inversionista nacional.
Los inversionistas extranjeros no podrán demandar a los Estados Nacionales ni a los Gobiernos por desarrollar políticas de interés público
17. Comercio que respeta la vida. Mientras los TLCs promueve el patentamiento de la biodiversidad y del genoma humano, el TCP los protege como patrimonio común de la humanidad y la madre tierra.
18. La anteposición del derecho al desarrollo y a la salud a la propiedad intelectual e industrial. A diferencia de los TLCs que buscan patentar y ampliar la duración de la patente de invenciones que son fundamentales para la salud humana, la preservación de la madre tierra y el crecimiento de los países en desarrollo, -muchas de las cuáles han sido realizadas con fondos o subvenciones publicas- el TCP ante pone el derecho al desarrollo y a la salud antes que la propiedad intelectual de las transnacionales.
19. Adopción de mecanismos que conlleven a la independencia monetaria y financiera. Impulso a mecanismos que ayuden a fortalecer la soberanía monetaria, financiera, y la complementariedad en esta materia entre los países.
20. Protección de los derechos de los trabajadores y los derechos de los pueblos indígenas. Promoción de la vigencia plena de los mismos y la sanción a la empresa y no al país que los incumple.
21. Publicación de las negociaciones comerciales a fin de que el pueblo pueda ejercer su papel protagónico y participativo en el comercio. Nada de negociaciones secretas y a espaldas de la población.
22.       La calidad como la acumulación social de conocimiento, y su aplicación en la producción en función de la satisfacción de las necesidades sociales de los pueblos, según un nuevo concepto de calidad en el marco del ALBA-TCP para que los estándares no se conviertan en obstáculos a la producción y al intercambio comercial entre los pueblos.
23. La libre movilidad de las personas como un derecho humano. El TCP reafirma el derecho a la libre movilidad humana, con el objeto de fortalecer los lazos de hermandad entre todos los países del mundo.
VII CUMBRE DE JEFES DE ESTADO Y DE GOBIERNO DE LA
ALIANZA BOLIVARIANA PARA LOS PUEBLOS DE NUESTRA AMERICA (ALBA –TCP)
(Cochabamba, 17 de octubre de 2009)

REPORT – Plenary Discussion on ASEAN Economic Pillar

Today, discount the European Union stands at a crossroads.One of the EU’s overarching objectives is to generate economic prosperity. This has been pursuedby promoting productivity and consumption, purchase which was expected to increase social cohesion,stimulate employment, reduce poverty and advance environmental protection.

But economic growth and competitiveness became objectives in themselves, rather than means toan end. Social and environmental policies proved too weak to achieve their goals. On top of social and ecological challenges, the EU today faces an unprecedented economic downturn.

The lesson from these events is clear: we need a major re-thinking of Europe’s strategic direction.This year will bring a new Commission and newly-elected Parliament, and in 2010 we will seethe adoption of a new political guidance for the EU by its Heads of State.

The time to influencethe strategic direction of the EU is now. We have a unique opportunity to ensure that the EU putsthe economy at the service of people and planet – instead of the other way round.The Spring Alliance has been formed to do exactly this. It is a joint campaign initiated by four leading European civil society organisations: the European Environmental Bureau, the EuropeanTrade Union Confederation, Social Platform and Concord.

The Spring Alliance Manifesto is also supported by organisations from all corners of civil society and beyond, including fair-tradeassociations, anti-poverty and health campaigners, consumer organisations and representatives from the research community.

This Manifesto outlines 17 proposals for an EU that puts people and the planet first. We explainwhy these recommendations should be taken, and list concrete steps that illustrate how decisionmakers can turn our proposals into reality.


Download the PDF

Today, hospital the European Union stands at a crossroads.One of the EU’s overarching objectives is to generate economic prosperity. This has been pursuedby promoting productivity and consumption, advice which was expected to increase social cohesion,stimulate employment, reduce poverty and advance environmental protection.

But economic growth and competitiveness became objectives in themselves, rather than means toan end. Social and environmental policies proved too weak to achieve their goals. On top of social and ecological challenges, the EU today faces an unprecedented economic downturn.

The lesson from these events is clear: we need a major re-thinking of Europe’s strategic direction.This year will bring a new Commission and newly-elected Parliament, and in 2010 we will seethe adoption of a new political guidance for the EU by its Heads of State.

The time to influencethe strategic direction of the EU is now. We have a unique opportunity to ensure that the EU putsthe economy at the service of people and planet – instead of the other way round.The Spring Alliance has been formed to do exactly this. It is a joint campaign initiated by four leading European civil society organisations: the European Environmental Bureau, the EuropeanTrade Union Confederation, Social Platform and Concord.

The Spring Alliance Manifesto is also supported by organisations from all corners of civil society and beyond, including fair-tradeassociations, anti-poverty and health campaigners, consumer organisations and representatives from the research community.

This Manifesto outlines 17 proposals for an EU that puts people and the planet first. We explainwhy these recommendations should be taken, and list concrete steps that illustrate how decisionmakers can turn our proposals into reality.


Download the PDF

Today, diagnosis the European Union stands at a crossroads.One of the EU’s overarching objectives is to generate economic prosperity. This has been pursuedby promoting productivity and consumption, sickness which was expected to increase social cohesion, stimulate employment, reduce poverty and advance environmental protection.

But economic growth and competitiveness became objectives in themselves, rather than means toan end. Social and environmental policies proved too weak to achieve their goals. On top of social and ecological challenges, the EU today faces an unprecedented economic downturn.

The lesson from these events is clear: we need a major re-thinking of Europe’s strategic direction.This year will bring a new Commission and newly-elected Parliament, and in 2010 we will seethe adoption of a new political guidance for the EU by its Heads of State.

The time to influencethe strategic direction of the EU is now. We have a unique opportunity to ensure that the EU putsthe economy at the service of people and planet – instead of the other way round.The Spring Alliance has been formed to do exactly this. It is a joint campaign initiated by four leading European civil society organisations: the European Environmental Bureau, the EuropeanTrade Union Confederation, Social Platform and Concord.

The Spring Alliance Manifesto is also supported by organisations from all corners of civil society and beyond, including fair-tradeassociations, anti-poverty and health campaigners, consumer organisations and representatives from the research community.

This Manifesto outlines 17 proposals for an EU that puts people and the planet first. We explainwhy these recommendations should be taken, and list concrete steps that illustrate how decisionmakers can turn our proposals into reality.


Download the PDF

Today, physician the European Union stands at a crossroads.

One of the EU’s overarching objectives is to generate economic prosperity. This has been pursuedby promoting productivity and consumption, for sale which was expected to increase social cohesion, sovaldi stimulate employment, reduce poverty and advance environmental protection.

But economic growth and competitiveness became objectives in themselves, rather than means toan end. Social and environmental policies proved too weak to achieve their goals. On top of social and ecological challenges, the EU today faces an unprecedented economic downturn. The lesson from these events is clear: we need a major re-thinking of Europe’s strategic direction.

This year will bring a new Commission and newly-elected Parliament, and in 2010 we will seethe adoption of a new political guidance for the EU by its Heads of State. The time to influence the strategic direction of the EU is now.

We have a unique opportunity to ensure that the EU putsthe economy at the service of people and planet – instead of the other way round.The Spring Alliance has been formed to do exactly this. It is a joint campaign initiated by four leading European civil society organisations: the European Environmental Bureau, the EuropeanTrade Union Confederation, Social Platform and Concord.

The Spring Alliance Manifesto is also supported by organisations from all corners of civil society and beyond, including fair-tradeassociations, anti-poverty and health campaigners, consumer organisations and representatives from the research community.

This Manifesto outlines 17 proposals for an EU that puts people and the planet first. We explainwhy these recommendations should be taken, and list concrete steps that illustrate how decisionmakers can turn our proposals into reality.


Download the PDF

The ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) vision talks about a stable, prosperous, and highly competitive region, for sale with equitable economic development, and reduced poverty and economic disparities. Its goal is to hasten complete liberalization and opening up of the regional economy by 2015. However, this framework of a competitive market economy which mainly benefits MNCs/TNCs in developed countries has long been criticized. In addition, it has only benefited developed ASEAN countries and has undermined developing countries within the region – thereby exacerbating regional asymmetries, leading to greater poverty and inequality. The economic integration model pursued by ASEAN has negatively impacted its working peoples and their families where working conditions, livelihoods and living standards have deteriorated.


Download the PDF

PLANTEAMIENTO POLITICO DE LAS MUJERES

Dirigido a la Cumbre de la Alianza Bolivariana para los  Pueblos de Nuestra América –ALBA-

Cochabamba, clinic 16 y 17 de octubre 2009

La ALBA es coincidente en su propuesta con principios y reivindicaciones históricas planteadas por el movimiento de mujeres. Sus principios de solidaridad, shop cooperación, reciprocidad, complementariedad, diversidad e igualdad, han sido la base de las prácticas y contribuciones económicas de las mujeres, ligadas prioritariamente a la reproducción integral de procesos y condiciones de vida, y son también el eje de nuestras visiones sobre un nuevo sistema económico. Así, la ALBA confluye con la aspiración de las mujeres latinoamericanas y caribeñas de levantar una sociedad integrada desde una perspectiva incluyente, que recoja y potencie la policroma diversidad de sus pueblos, superando injusticias y desigualdades.

Nosotras, que participamos activamente en las luchas y resistencias contra los proyectos de integración pautados por el capital, reconocemos a la ALBA como expresión de la búsqueda de un proyecto propio, en el cual los movimientos sociales y los pueblos, con nuestra participación activa, podamos contribuir y consensuar un proceso de construcción de sociedades alternativas.

Apreciamos el potencial de la ALBA para plantear un proyecto latinoamericano basado en transformaciones mayores: el socialismo del siglo XXI –que, como lo han asumido ya algunos presidentes, ‘solo podrá ser feminista’-; el paradigma del Buen Vivir / Vivir Bien y la riqueza de la plurinacionalidad, que redefinen ya los estados de algunos de sus países miembros.

Valoramos el hecho de que, en su corta vida, la ALBA registra ya logros en el terreno del intercambio solidario, en los dominios de educación, salud,  cooperación energética; es notable su proyección como espacio de concertación política y resolución de conflictos, de construcción de posiciones comunes, “en defensa de la independencia, la soberanía, la autodeterminación y la identidad de los países que la integran y de los intereses y las aspiraciones de los pueblos del Sur frente a los intentos de dominación política y económica”.

Como parte de los movimientos sociales y como protagonistas históricas de experiencias no mercantilizadas, hemos planteado, al igual que la ALBA, que nuestras sociedades se construyan sobre la base de la “unión de los pueblos, la autodeterminación, la complementariedad económica, el comercio justo, la lucha contra la pobreza, la preservación de la identidad cultural, la integración energética, la defensa del ambiente y la justicia”; desde esta coincidencia de perspectivas nos proponemos mancomunar esfuerzos para lograr los objetivos comunes de construcción de una Latinoamérica autodeterminada, solidaria, libre de relaciones patriarcales y levantada bajo los designios del Buen Vivir / Vivir Bien.

La consolidación de la ALBA como un espacio de soberanía política, económica, social, institucional, cultural, de la diversidad, de lo popular y de lo público demanda cambios de fondo en la manera de pensar, diseñar, decidir y materializar las políticas. Se trata de construir un nuevo paradigma societal, que va más allá de rediseñar el existente. Este es un reto que requiere aunar toda la inteligencia, comprensión y capacidad de diálogo entre los gobiernos de los países de la ALBA y los movimientos sociales, de manera fluida y permanente.

La creación del Consejo Ministerial de Mujeres y del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales, es paso importante para la articulación efectiva entre los gobiernos y los pueblos.  Saludamos esta decisión, a la vez que ofrecemos nuestro concurso para contribuir con el desarrollo de una perspectiva feminista en el conjunto de iniciativas y de políticas de la ALBA, como también para visualizar las medidas específicas que deberían tomarse para propiciar la igualdad de las mujeres y para erradicar el patriarcado.

Consideramos que los cambios que plantea la ALBA son alcanzables en tanto se amplíen y profundicen cambios como los que ya han emprendido algunos de nuestros países con un sentido de transformación estructural, que incluyen el reconocimiento de la diversidad económica y productiva y en ese marco la visibilización de las mujeres como actoras económicas, la equiparación entre el trabajo productivo y el reproductivo, el desarrollo de éticas de igualdad, diversidades y no violencia, el reconocimiento de la soberanía alimentaria, entre otros aspectos que podrían convertirse en punto común para todas las políticas públicas de la ALBA, colocando como eje el Buen Vivir / Vivir Bien y la sostenibilidad de la vida.

Con especial interés seguimos la propuesta de construir una Zona Económica de Desarrollo Compartido entre los países de la ALBA; consideramos que a su amparo y bajo un enfoque de economía diversa, social y solidaria, se pueden desarrollar iniciativas compartidas de soberanía alimentaria, de reconocimiento y desarrollo de los conocimientos de las mujeres,  de rescate y curaduría de las semillas nativas y de transgenosis natural, de producción y distribución cooperativa y asociativa, de generación de infraestructura y tecnologías orientadas al cuidado humano y ambiental.

La creación de núcleos de desarrollo endógeno binacionales o trinacionales, que transformen las condiciones de trabajo y empleo para las mujeres del campo y la ciudad, sería una importante experiencia de integración y preservación regional de la cultura productiva y solidaria acumulada históricamente por nuestros pueblos.
De igual manera, la creación de un Instituto de Estudios Feministas de los países de la ALBA, que organice intercambios de conocimientos y saberes entre los países, desarrolle proyectos de investigación sobre políticas públicas e internacionales, recupere los múltiples aportes de las mujeres a lo largo de nuestra historia, y juegue un papel activo en la generación de propuestas y desarrollo de asesorías a los gobiernos en esta materia, contribuirá significativamente al fortalecimiento de nuestro proceso de cambio regional.

La ALBA es un espacio privilegiado para el impulso de un proyecto de integración alternativo que no debe repetir el déficit democrático de las propuestas precedentes. La participación en la concepción, diseño y ejecución de proyectos debe ser una divisa, por ello proponemos, como forma inicial de materialización de esa participación, que en la  instancia técnica del Consejo Social encargada de elaborar estudios, preparar propuestas y formular proyectos relacionados con las políticas sociales de la ALBA, así como de coordinar y darles seguimiento, se contemple la participación paritaria de las mujeres, la misma que deberá hacerse extensiva a todas las instancias, incluidas aquellas de decisión, gestión y representación.

La ALBA tiene la particularidad de reunir a países de la Región Andina, Centroamérica y el Caribe, con problemáticas comunes y diferentes en materia de salud y vulnerabilidad frente a los fenómenos climáticos. Sería pertinente la creación de redes de intercambio y ayuda de las organizaciones de mujeres ante situaciones de emergencia epidemiológica y catástrofes naturales.

Si bien el surgimiento y desarrollo de la ALBA ha sido un factor reconfortante en la senda de nuestras luchas, persisten en el mundo y en la región tendencias y procesos que constituyen zonas de riesgo y/o amenazas para los procesos de cambio, ante los cuales debemos permanecer alerta y desplegar toda la capacidad en defensa de nuestros procesos de transformación.  Declarar a los países de la ALBA como territorios de paz y libres de bases militares extrajeras es una propuesta de gran coherencia y defensa de la soberanía.

Con preocupación vemos el avance en la región de un modelo de crecimiento focalizado en megaproyectos, que avanzan sin el consentimiento de los pueblos y atentan contra sus derechos, soberanía y autodeterminación.  El auge de monumentales obras de infraestructura bajo el amparo de proyectos como IIRSA y el Plan Mesoamérica, involucran a países de toda América Latina, incluso países de la ALBA. Tales obras son el sustento para la profundización y ampliación de economías de enclave, basadas en la racionalidad extractivista, deprededadora en su relación con la naturaleza y reproductora de las condiciones de relegamiento de nuestros pueblos. Estas obras tienen un notorio impacto sobre las mujeres, en especial las indígenas, comprometen la soberanía alimentaria de esas localidades y alteran la geografía, los ecosistemas y los patrones de consumo tradicional; algunas de ellas abren paso a la depredación de los recursos localizados en la Amazonía y en los bosques tropicales de Centroamérica.

Creemos que es urgente que los gobiernos de la ALBA consideren colectivamente una crítica y distanciamiento de tales iniciativas del capitalismo neoliberal y asuman, sin ambigüedades, un nuevo enfoque de desarrollo congruente con la propuesta del Buen Vivir / Vivir Bien y con el proceso de cambios y estructurales que la ALBA conlleva.
Con inquietud hemos visto, asimismo, el relanzamiento del Fondo Monetario Internacional en varios foros internacionales, como instancia reguladora frente a la actual crisis; resulta ofensivo hacia nuestros pueblos ignorar la responsabilidad de esa institución no sólo en las dinámicas que condujeron a la propia crisis, sino también en la aplicación de las políticas neoliberales que aún nos afectan duramente.  Ratificamos nuestra convicción, expresada en el último Foro Social Mundial (Belém 2009), de que el enfrentamiento a la crisis demanda alternativas anticapitalistas, antirracistas,  anti-imperialistas, socialistas, feministas y ecologistas.

Es igualmente preocupante que se mantengan injustificadas expectativas en que la conclusión de la Ronda Doha de la OMC pueda resolver los problemas de acceso al mercado para los países ‘en desarrollo’. Los pueblos reclamamos el comercio justo y solidario frente al libre comercio; la apertura indiscriminada de nuestros mercados desplazó a las y los productores locales, la sustitución de importaciones fue demonizada para abrir nuestros mercados a los productos importados, la competencia se impuso a la lógica de la complementariedad y cooperación regional.

La ALBA es un espacio invaluable para el rescate y el desarrollo de las producciones locales que fortalezcan las relaciones entre los pueblos y favorezcan formas de gestión colectiva, definida en torno al interés social y a los derechos de la naturaleza, por lo mismo debería extender la influencia de su filosofía a los acuerdos internacionales  con otras regiones.

La ALBA es un espacio privilegiado para la construcción de soberanía financiera. Recuperar el control sobre nuestros ahorros y recursos financieros y reorientar su utilización hacia nuestros objetivos estratégicos, con criterios de democratización y redistribución es fundamental. Resalta como mecanismo el Banco de la ALBA, que puede ser uno de los puntales para desarrollo de iniciativas económicas de carácter social y solidario de alcance regional, nacional y local, que se fundamenten en visiones de complementariedad entre los países y de justicia de género, integrando medidas eficaces para asegurar el acceso de las mujeres a los recursos y a la toma de decisiones. En igual sentido valoramos la importancia de la adopción del SUCRE como medio de intercambio soberano y eficaz en el comercio internacional entre nuestros países.

Finalmente, es un desafío común para los países de la ALBA avanzar en políticas y medidas conjuntas para:

Reconocer, dentro de las modalidades de trabajo, a las labores de autosustento y cuidado humano no remunerado que se realiza en los hogares. Los Estados deberían comprometerse a facilitar servicios e infraestructura para la atención pública y comunitaria de las necesidades básicas de todos los grupos dependientes (niñas/os, personas con discapacidad, adultas/os mayores), definir horarios de trabajo adecuados, impulsando la corresponsabilidad y reciprocidad de hombres y mujeres en el trabajo doméstico y en las obligaciones familiares, así como extender la seguridad social a quienes hacen esas labores.

Impulsar reformas agrarias integrales y sostenibles, con una visión holística de la tierra como fuente de vida, que propicien la diversidad económica y productiva, la redistribución y la prohibición del latifundio.

Impulsar la integración energética de América Latina y El Caribe bajo los principios del Buen Vivir / Vivir Bien, priorizando dentro de las estrategias de cooperación, proyectos de generación de energías limpias para fortalecer las capacidades de las pequeñas unidades productivas y las condiciones de vida de las poblaciones más empobrecidas.

ALBA, un nuevo amanecer para nuestros pueblos
con igualdad para las mujeres!

Red Latinoamericana Mujeres Transformando la Economía –REMTE-
Articulación de Mujeres de la CLOC- Vía Campesina
Federación de Mujeres Cubanas
Federación Democrática Internacional de Mujeres
FEDAEPS


Hacia la fundación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del “ALBA – TCP”
Durante muchos años nuestros pueblos y naciones originarias fueron saqueados permanentemente y reducidos a simples colonias por los países más poderosos del mundo, nurse quienes en su afán de acumulación de riqueza invadieron nuestros territorios, se adueñaron de nuestras riquezas, culturas, conciencias, enajenando nuestro trabajo y ofendiendo a nuestra madre tierra (pachamama) depredando los recursos que existe en ella en pos de lucro desmedido.
En los 80 una inmensa deuda externa imposible de pagar nos postró aun más en la pobreza y la miseria, volviendo a generarse la violencia institucional que ya se había vivido con la militarización de nuestros pueblos, la desaparición y la tortura de nuestros familiares y el sometimiento de nuestras naciones indígenas originarias campesinas.
A lo anterior, ya en la etapa neoliberal, se añaden en el marco del capitalismo transnacional y globalizado los inhumanos procesos de desnacionalización y la sumisión absoluta de los gobiernos neoliberales a los dictados del Fondo Monetario Internacional y del Banco Mundial.
Todo esto ha hecho que la voluntad popular no signifique nada en el esquema del pensamiento de las transnacionales, de la explotación y el crimen, recordándonos permanentemente que la era de colonización de nuestros pueblos aún no ha terminado.
La intromisión del imperialismo yanqui en la historia de nuestros pueblos como ocurrió con países como Colombia, Haití, México, Puerto Rico, Nicaragua, Argentina, Ecuador, Venezuela, Bolivia, entre otros, con el pretexto de luchar contra el “terrorismo” o el “narcotráfico” ha expoliado nuestros recursos y ha empobrecido a nuestra gente; igual que los colonizadores de la “cruz y la espada” se ha apoderado de nuestras riquezas y ha dañado el medio ambiente.
La desigualdad económica, política y social, al igual que la exclusión y la discriminación son producto del neoliberalismo y el colonialismo de larga data, que debilitaron a los Estados y supeditaron el bienestar de nuestros pueblos a los designios de las organizaciones multinacionales y a los intereses de las empresas trasnacionales. La capacidad destructiva del sistema de dominación imperialista es aterradora, el desempleo aumenta y la esperanza de vida desciende; ellos mismos se encuentran ahora sumidos en una crisis sistémica cuya resolución no puede ser a costa del bienestar de nuestros pueblos.
Los movimientos sociales, expresión de las organizaciones indígenas originarias, afro descendientes, campesinas, organizaciones sindicales, juveniles, gremiales, los maestros, los obreros, los sin tierra, los productores cocaleros, las juntas de vecinos, profesionales progresistas y otros que luchan no solo por reivindicaciones salariales, sino también por la vida y el respeto a la madre tierra, desde antes, y desde siempre fueron los verdaderos artífices de la revolución y de las transformaciones profundas.
No olvidemos que los movimientos sociales hemos jugado un papel central en los últimos años en la perspectiva de una democratización y descolonización profunda de nuestros países, por un cambio sustantivo y genuinamente transformador tanto en lo económico, como en lo superestructural de nuestra Abya Yala.
Recordemos que el 14 de diciembre de 2004, Cuba y Venezuela proponen dar inicio e impulsar el ALBA, como alternativa al ALCA, que permita a nuestros pueblos y naciones avanzar políticamente en la búsqueda de una verdadera y libre integración, basada en la solidaridad, que responda a las necesidades sociales, políticas, educativas, culturales, económicas, reconociendo las luchas históricas de los pueblos latinoamericanos y caribeños por su unidad y soberanía.
En noviembre de 2005, en el marco de la Cumbre de las Américas en Mar del Plata, se da la simbólica derrota del ALCA que fue organizada por la Alianza Social Continental, como aporte a la integración.
Meses después en enero de 2006, en el marco del capítulo del Foro Social Mundial, el Presidente Chávez se reúne con Movimientos Sociales y plantea la necesidad de la creación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del Alba.
El año 2006, en Lima Perú se lleva a cabo la Cumbre Enlazando Alternativas, paralela a la Cumbre de Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de América Latina y la Unión Europea, en la que se avanza en la articulación de los Movimientos Sociales en el marco del proceso de integración latinoamericana.
Más tarde en noviembre del 2006, en la ciudad de Cochabamba, Bolivia, se celebra la Cumbre Social por la integración de los Pueblos, paralela a la Cumbre Presidencial de la Comunidad Suramericana de Naciones (CSN). Fue organizada por la Alianza Social Continental, como aporte a la integración en el marco de una gran movilización de los movimientos sociales, originarios y originarios del país.
En la V Cumbre del ALBA celebrada en abril de 2007 se lanza la declaración de Tintorero donde se aprueba la creación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA.
Después en noviembre de 2007, en la II Reunión de la Comisión Política del ALBA, el Consejo de Ministros decide que cada país miembro debe crear su capítulo nacional en el marco de la conformación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA, y que los integrantes de dicho capítulo acordaran la forma y metodología para el funcionamiento de dicho Consejo, así como la invitación a otros movimientos sociales de países extra-ALBA a participar en el mismo.
En ese mismo año, se expande la Alternativa Bolivariana a partir de la formación de las casas del ALBA a países no integrados al ALBA con la participación de las organizaciones sociales de esos países, entre ellos en Perú.
Posteriormente en enero del año 2008, en Caracas se celebra la VI Cumbre del ALBA, donde se aprueba la estrategia para el Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA, incluyendo sus principios, estructura y funciones, además se acuerda darle continuidad a dos acciones pendientes aprobadas en Tintorero, que son:
– Identificar en el ámbito Latinoamericano y caribeño, organizaciones, redes y campañas sub-regionales y regionales, nacionales y locales, en países extra-ALBA que puedan ser convocadas para formar parte del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales”.
– Realizar reunión constitutiva del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales”.
El complejo proceso de organización de la institucionalidad del ALBA-TCP como mecanismo de integración, las realidades y desafíos que han vivido algunos de los procesos políticos de los países miembros (Bolivia, Venezuela), otras prioridades y esfuerzos dentro del ALBA-TCP y criterios de países miembros han determinado que esta iniciativa esté pospuesta desde esa fecha (Aún en febrero de este año, 2009, la Comisión Política acordó “establecer un plazo a la creación de los capítulos nacionales de movimientos sociales y comunicar a la coordinación permanente del ALBA los detalles al respecto antes de finales de abril de 2009. Ello con el fin de promover la instalación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA el primero de mayo de 2009”).
Y es en este contexto que en julio de 2008 el MST y las organizaciones de la Vía Campesina Brasil, en diálogo con otras organizaciones del continente, convocan a sendos encuentros en la Escuela Nacional Florestán Fernández (MST) con un grupo sustantivo de líderes y operadores políticos de movimientos y organizaciones sociales, para, con todos estos antecedentes, llamar a un proceso de construcción de una articulación hemisférica de movimientos y organizaciones sociales en torno a los principios del ALBA y sus iniciativas. Resultado de esta reunión es la Carta de los Movimientos Sociales de las Américas que fue lanzada en la Asamblea de Movimientos Sociales, en ocasión del III Foro Social de las Américas (Guatemala, octubre 2008).
En enero de 2009, como parte de las actividades del VIII FSM 2009, celebrado en Belem de Pará, Brasil, se reunieron en la Asamblea de Movimientos Sociales, representantes de centenares de organizaciones y movimientos de todos los países de las Américas, que se identifican con el proceso de construcción del ALBA, para aprobar esta carta en su versión definitiva: Carta de los Movimientos Sociales de las Américas. Construyendo la integración de los pueblos desde abajo. Impulsando el ALBA y la solidaridad de los pueblos, frente al proyecto del imperialismo.
Recientemente en septiembre de este año, en Sao Paulo se realiza una Convocatoria a los Movimientos Sociales de Las Américas con el objetivo de articular el proceso de construcción del ALBA a partir de los Movimientos Sociales.
Con este recuento no solo reflejamos el camino recorrido en este proceso de integración hasta la fecha, sino que los alentamos a reflexionar y construir desde nuestra historia común.
En efecto lo que estamos viviendo en América Latina es parte de un proceso abarcador de reapropiación social de nuestro destino, de nuevas formas de organización política, horizontal, de democracia directa y participativa, de una economía plural que recupere los recursos naturales en beneficio de los pueblos, de una construcción de nuevas relaciones sociales armónicas, solidarias y comunitarias de producción.
Ahora con una fuerza inusitada surge en América y el mundo el grito de libertad, de lucha por la recuperación de nuestro territorio, de nuestras libertades, de nuestra soberanía; miles de hermanos se sumaron a la causa revolucionaria para liberar la patria, miles de ellos ofrendaron sus vidas en este intento, en diferentes épocas y de diferentes maneras, mártires de la revolución fueron los Tupac Katari, Tupac Amaru, Bartolina Sisa, Manuela Saenz, Apiaguayki Tumpa, Juana Azurduy de Padilla, Santos Pariamo, Marcelo Quiroga Santa Cruz, Inti Peredo, Lempira el héroe de la revolución hondureña, el libertador Simón Bolívar, Augusto Cesar Sandino, José Martí, Ernesto Che Guevara, Salvador Allende. Luis Espinal y actualmente los cinco patriotas cubanos que purgan condenas perpetúas por el solo hecho de luchar contra el terrorismo, contra el imperialismo.
Esta Primera Cumbre del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales en el marco del ALBA-TCP, es una Cumbre histórica que permite la participación directa de los movimientos sociales en los diferentes medios de cooperación y solidaridad, a diferencia de otros mecanismos de integración de países, que nunca han considerado la participación plena de los pueblos y naciones, limitándose a meros intercambios de intereses mercantilistas que van en contra de la integración y reciprocidad de pueblos y naciones de la gran Abya Yala (latinoamericana).
En este contexto la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América y el Caribe, se constituye en un verdadero espacio de construcción de una nueva patria latinoamericana, portando la bandera de la humanidad por su definitiva emancipación. Por eso estamos dispuestos a combatir contra la explotación del hombre por el hombre, considerando que existe la latente necesidad de una “segunda independencia”.
Ésta Cumbre Internacional, es el saludo de los Movimientos Sociales de los países miembros del ALBA-TCP, a la VII Cumbre de Presidentes de la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América – Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos, que durante media década lucha por la desaparición de toda forma de dominación y explotación contra los pueblos y la construcción de relaciones de complementariedad y ayuda recíproca en procura de su desarrollo y de lograr el buen vivir.
Aquí, desde el corazón de Sudamérica, desde los pueblos combatientes, las organizaciones indígenas originarios campesinas, obreros, trabajadores, estudiantes, clase media y profesionales comprometidos con su pueblo de Venezuela, Cuba, Bolivia, Antigua y Barbuda, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Honduras, la Mancomunidad de Domínica, San Vicente y las Granadinas, aunados en el Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP, nos comprometemos a defender los principios revolucionarios del ALBA-TCP, que potencian la lucha y la resistencia contra todo tipo de explotación para construir un mundo diferente.
Nuestro objetivo como Consejo de Movimientos Sociales de los países miembros del ALBA-TCP, es la lucha por el pluralismo en nuestros países y en el mundo entero, sustentada en la armonía entre nuestros pueblos y la madre tierra para el buen vivir, en los principios morales, éticos, políticos y económicos de nuestras comunidades y barrios del campo y la ciudad. Pretendemos forjar desde el seno del pueblo una nueva Patria Social Comunitaria, descolonizada y fundada en la multidiversidad, respetuosa de las diferencias y de las particularidades sociales y regionales.
La actuación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales, estará fundamentada en los siguientes principios:
– Es un espacio inclusivo, abierto, diverso y plural, a partir de la identificación con los objetivos y principios del ALBA-TCP.
– Es un espacio para compartir y desarrollar agendas comunes que beneficien a los pueblos, sin convertirnos en un espacio para dirimir disputas y representaciones políticas.
– Es un espacio para fortalecer posiciones políticas económicas y sociales, sin convertirnos en un foro o asamblea de actuación social, que reconoce los espacios de articulación existentes.
– Significa el compromiso de la plena identificación con los principios generales que definen el ALBA-TCP como proceso de integración.
– Expresa la legitimidad y representación real de los Movimientos Sociales que se integran.
– En países miembros, sostener permanente diálogo e interrelación con sus respectivos gobiernos.
– Cada Coordinación Nacional en los países miembros del ALBA-TCP, definirá sus propias dinámicas de actuación y de relacionamiento con sus gobiernos.
– En países miembros del ALBA-TCP, los vínculos de las organizaciones sociales con el CMS, se desarrollará a través de las Coordinaciones Nacionales.
– Integrar el enfoque de género, reconociendo el legítimo derecho de la participación de la mujer en los movimientos sociales con equidad, igualdad real y justicia social.
Los pueblos de América Latina que pertenecemos a la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América Latina y el Caribe – Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos, organizados en este Consejo, continuaremos luchando contra los constantes intentos del imperialismo norteamericano de privarnos del desarrollo económico pleno; ni los ataques, amedrentamientos, armas, utilización de la violencia podrán callarnos, seguiremos luchando y siendo solidarios ahora particularmente con el pueblo hermano de Honduras.
Estamos convencidos de que sólo con la organización, movilización y la unidad de los pueblos del ALBA-TCP, es posible un auténtico proceso de integración, como también el logro de la transformación económica, social, política y cultural de nuestros países.
Esta Cumbre reafirma la voluntad de Bolivia, Venezuela, Cuba, Antigua y Barbuda, San Vicente y las Granadinas, Nicaragua, Honduras, Ecuador y la Mancomunidad de Dominica por el desarrollo y el fortalecimiento del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales sobre la base de una solidaridad comprometida con los demás pueblos del continente; optamos por la lucha plural, democrática, antifascista y antiimperialista, a través de un trabajo con objetivos políticos que no escondan su naturaleza ni su carácter revolucionario.
La conformación de este Consejo de Movimientos Sociales nos permite salir de las luchas locales y aisladas, de nuestras fronteras nacionales para integrarnos en la dimensión del AbyaYala o patria latinoamericana, permite la complementariedad y participación de los pueblos en los diferentes Consejos y Grupos de Trabajo que son las instancias de unificación que funcionan en el marco de la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América Latina y el Caribe.
Para lo cual se conforma un comité ad hoc, que coordinara Bolivia, y será integrado por un representante de los tres capítulos nacionales ya creados (Bolivia, Venezuela y Cuba) y otras importantes organizaciones, redes y campañas para impulsar el proceso de constitución del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP en seis meses.
Es dado en la ciudad de Cochabamba, a los 16 días del mes octubre de 2009.
______________________________
PROPUESTA DE ACCION
– Consolidación de los capítulos nacionales con organizaciones representativas de los movimientos sociales.
– Incorporar a los movimientos sociales de los países del ALBA en el Exterior. Así como organizaciones sociales presentes en los países Miembros del ALBA.
– Crear espacios de discusión para evaluar actividades de los movimientos sociales y desarrollar programas comunes.
– Que los movimientos sociales realicen actividades de solidaridad de manera conjunta.
– Saludamos las iniciativas de Vía Campesina, MST y otras organizaciones, propuestas en septiembre de 2009 en Sao Paulo, en la perspectiva de fortalecer la articulación de los movimientos sociales del continente. En específico, nos sumamos a la iniciativa de la realización de una Asamblea Continental de Movimientos Sociales con el ALBA, para el primer semestre del 2010.
– Fortalecer los programas de desarrollo, participación y asistencia a través de los movimientos sociales.
– Asignación presupuestaria a los movimientos sociales
– Privilegiar el proceso de participación de la mujer en la dirección de los movimientos sociales.
– Incorporación de manera progresiva a organizaciones comunitarias pequeñas con igualdad de derecho de participación.
– Luchar por los derechos de los inmigrantes a un trabajo digno y a la salud.
– Impulsar la participación de los movimientos sociales de los países cuyos gobiernos no son integrantes formales del ALBA como forma de globalizar la lucha.
– Los programas de los movimientos sociales deben ser entregados a los Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de los Países del ALBA a través de resoluciones para su aprobación.
– Los “10 mandamientos para salvar la vida y el planeta, la humanidad y la vida” propuesto por el Presidente Evo Morales deben ser adoptados como principios fundamentales de los movimientos sociales.
– Cada capítulo nacional debe establecer sus programas que respondan a las necesidades reales de los pueblos.
– Establecer mecanismos de comunicación permanente entre los movimientos sociales y los pueblos y naciones indígenas originarias campesinas, donde se compartan las experiencias del proceso en cada país.
– Desarrollar programas de formación para los voceros de los movimientos sociales.
– Crear una red de medios de comunicación e información propios de los movimientos sociales.
– Luchar y demandar el derecho de los pueblos a la paz y a su autodeterminación.
– Invitar a las Nacionalidades y pueblos indígenas; a las comunidades del campo y de la ciudad; a las organizaciones populares; a los medios y redes de comunicación comunitaria y masiva; a todos y todas los habitantes del mundo, a difundir, denunciar y condenar en sus espacios; las estrategias de intervención de los Estados Unidos, a través de bases militares en Colombia, en la región, y el resto del mundo.
– Impulsar campañas en contra de las empresas transnacionales e impulsar proyectos gran nacionales promovidos por los gobiernos del ALBA A TRAVES DEL TRATADO DE COMERCIO DE LOS PUEBLOS.
– Apoyar la adopción de una moneda internacional, promovidos por los países del ALBA y la UNASUR.
– Estimular las luchas sociales para el re-ascenso del movimiento de masas.
Para lo cual se conforma un comité ad hoc, que coordinara Bolivia, y será integrado por un representante de los tres capítulos nacionales ya creados (Bolivia, Venezuela y Cuba) y otras importantes organizaciones, redes y campañas para impulsar el proceso de constitución del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP en seis meses

(Cochabamba, purchase Bolivia– 17 de Octubre de 2009)

Nosotros, sildenafil los Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de los países miembros de la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América – Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos (ALBA – TCP), en ocasión de la VII Cumbre en la ciudad de Cochabamba, Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia, el 17 de octubre de 2009.
Teniendo presente las aspiraciones de independencia de los pueblos americanos, desde la resistencia indígena a los conquistadores emprendida por Tupaj Amaru, Tupaj Katari, Guacaipuro, Diriangén y Miskut, pasando por nuestros próceres Eugenio Espejo, Francisco de Miranda, Simón Bolívar, Antonio José de Sucre, Francisco Morazán, José Martí, Eloy Alfaro Delgado y Augusto C. Sandino, hasta nuestros días, en que los pueblos de América Latina y el Caribe se levantan recogiendo las banderas de libertad y justicia de los que nos antecedieron.
Reafirmando nuestro compromiso de continuar con el legado histórico de nuestros libertadores, de avanzar en la unión de los pueblos de nuestra América para la construcción de la Patria Grande como único camino para garantizar la verdadera independencia.
Recordando que las políticas de carácter neoliberal aplicadas en América Latina y el Caribe han generado la exclusión de las mayorías populares en la satisfacción de sus necesidades y han profundizado la desigualdad y la pobreza en la región, beneficiando exclusivamente a los agentes económicos transnacionales y a los grandes monopolios.
Reivindicando los procesos revolucionarios y de liberación expresados en la decisión firme de los pueblos de nuestra América, de romper con los esquemas hegemónicos y de superar el modelo neoliberal y sus efectos en la región que implica terminar con la lógica de la acumulación, el lucro, la ganancia, la competencia y la especulación financiera, así como avanzar en la construcción de un proyecto alternativo basado en los principios de solidaridad, cooperación, complementariedad y respeto a la soberanía y a la autodeterminación de los pueblos.
Condenando el propósito imperialista y neocolonialista que pretende prolongar el modelo de dominación política, económica y militar sobre nuestro continente y mantener, así, una relación histórica de explotación y dependencia, utilizando los instrumentos del libre comercio para la expansión y profundización de la hegemonía capitalista que conduce a la exaltación de la riqueza privada como motor de la dinámica social, y la pérdida de la noción de lo público, lo social y lo humano.
Constatando que es cada vez más necesario implementar políticas que incentiven el intercambio comercial como instrumento de unión de los pueblos asociado al desarrollo productivo entre nuestros países, identificando nuevos esquemas y mecanismos de intercambio económico, así como nuevos actores para el beneficio de las mayorías excluidas.
Reafirmando que es esencial impulsar el desarrollo integral socioproductivo respetando los Derechos de la Madre Tierra y contribuir decididamente a darle solución a la desigualdad y pobreza de nuestros pueblos.
Convencidos de que el modelo neoliberal expresado en los TLCs se encuentran al servicio de las transnacionales y los países ricos, obligando a los países a modificar su marco jurídico violando la soberanía de nuestros pueblos y promoviendo la privatización de los sectores estratégicos de la economía y los servicios básicos (agua, educación, salud, transporte, comunicaciones y energía), ocasionando la reducción del tamaño del Estado y limitando la regulación del mismo, a nivel de la participación accionaria, la reinversión de utilidades, la transferencia de ganancias, buscando abrir las compras públicas de los países en desarrollo a favor de las transnacionales, impulsando su dominio y la penetración en nuestras economías.
Reafirmando que los TLCs profundizan las desigualdades comerciales exaltando la competencia entre las empresas y países desigualmente desarrollados, buscando que los países pobres sigan siendo mono productores y mono exportadores, liberalizando sus mercados mediante la desgravación arancelaria total con el falso argumento de lograr el libre acceso recíproco a los mercados, ocultando los subsidios internos del norte y la gran desproporción entre la oferta exportable de los países desarrollados y los países en desarrollo.
Ratificando que los TLCs permiten que las transnacionales se apropien de los recursos naturales de nuestros pueblos, reduciendo a la humanidad a simples consumidores ampliando los mercados de las transnacionales considerando además a los alimentos como una simple mercancía.
Así mismo los TLCs promueven el patentamiento de la biodiversidad y el genoma humano, buscando ampliar la duración de las patentes de invenciones fundamentales para la salud humana.
Constatando que la crisis ha instalado de manera estructural distorsiones colosales en los mecanismos básicos de funcionamiento de los mercados y la formación de precios en los mercados internacionales a través de la inyección de miles de millones de dólares en juegos especulativos en los mercados cambiarios y en los mercados intermedios y futuros de bienes, por lo que se vuelve indispensable buscar mecanismos institucionales que recuperen la coherencia productiva y garanticen las condiciones básicas de seguridad y soberanía en los planos de alimentación, energía y cuidado de la salud, principalmente.
Definimos que los Principios Fundamentales que regirán el Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos (TCP) de nuestra Alianza, serán los siguientes:
1. Comercio con complementariedad, solidaridad y cooperación, para que juntos alcancemos una vida digna y el vivir bien, promoviendo reglas comerciales y de cooperación para el bienestar de la gente y en particular de los sectores mas desfavorecidos.
2.- Comercio soberano, sin condicionamientos ni intromisión en asuntos internos, respetando las constituciones políticas y las leyes de los Estados, sin obligarlos a aceptar condiciones, normas o compromisos.
3. Comercio complementario y solidario entre los pueblos, las naciones y sus empresas. El desarrollo de la complementación socioproductiva sobre bases de cooperación, aprovechamiento de capacidades y potencialidades existentes en los países, el ahorro de recursos y la creación de empleos. La búsqueda de la complementariedad, la cooperación y la solidaridad entre los diferentes países. El intercambio, la cooperación y la colaboración científico-técnica constantes como una forma de desarrollo, teniendo en consideración las fortalezas de los miembros en áreas específicas, con miras a constituir una masa crítica en el campo de la innovación, la ciencia y la tecnología.
4. Protección de la producción de interés nacional, para el desarrollo integral de todos los pueblos y naciones. Todos los países pueden industrializarse y diversificar su producción para un crecimiento integral de todos los sectores de su economía. El rechazo a la premisa de “exportar o morir” y el cuestionamiento del modelo de desarrollo basado en enclaves exportadores. El privilegio de la producción y el mercado nacional que impulsa la satisfacción de las necesidades de la población a través de los factores de producción internos, importando lo que es necesario y exportando los excedentes de forma complementaria.
5. El trato solidario para las economías más débiles. Cooperación y apoyo incondicional, con el fin de que alcancen un nivel de desarrollo sostenible, que permita alcanzar la suprema felicidad social.
Mientras los TLCs imponen reglas iguales y reciprocas para grandes y chicos, el TCP plantea un comercio que reconozca las diferencias entre los distintos países a través de reglas que favorezcan a las economías más pequeñas.
6. El reconocimiento del papel de los Estados soberanos en el desarrollo socio-económico, la regulación de la economía. A diferencia de los TLCs que persiguen la privatización de los diferentes sectores de la economía y el achicamiento del Estado, el TCP busca fortalecer al Estado como actor central de la economía de un país a todos los niveles enfrentando las prácticas privadas contrarias al interés público, tales como el monopolio, el oligopolio, la cartelización, acaparamiento, especulación y usura. El TCP apoya la nacionalización y la recuperación de las empresas y recursos naturales a los que tienen derecho los pueblos estableciendo mecanismos de defensa legal de los mismos.
7. Promoción de la armonía entre el hombre y la naturaleza, respetando los Derechos de la Madre Tierra y promoviendo un crecimiento económico en armonía con la naturaleza. Se reconoce los Derechos de la Madre Tierra y se impulsa la sostenibilidad en armonía con la naturaleza
8. La contribución del comercio y las inversiones al fortalecimiento de la identidad cultural e histórica de nuestros pueblos. Mientras los TLCs buscan convertir a toda la humanidad en simple consumidores homogenizando los patrones de consumo para ampliar así los mercados de las transnacionales, el TCP impulsa la diversidad de expresiones culturales en el comercio.
9. El favorecimiento a las comunidades, comunas, cooperativas, empresas de producción social, pequeñas y medianas empresas. La promoción conjunta hacia otros mercados de exportaciones de nuestros países y de producciones que resulten de acciones de complementación productiva.
10. El desarrollo de la soberanía y seguridad alimentaría de los países miembros en función de asegurar una alimentación con cantidad y calidad social e integral para nuestros pueblos. Apoyo a las políticas y la producción nacional de alimentos para garantizar el acceso de la población a una alimentación de cantidad y calidad adecuadas.
11. Comercio con políticas arancelarias ajustadas a los requerimientos de los países en desarrollo. La eliminación entre nuestros países de todas las barreras que constituyan un obstáculo a la complementación, permitiendo a los países subir sus aranceles para proteger a sus industrias nacientes o cuando consideren necesario para su desarrollo interno y el bienestar de su población con el fin de promover una mayor integración entre nuestros pueblos. Desgravaciones arancelarias asimétricas y no reciprocas que permiten a los países menos desarrollados subir sus aranceles para proteger a sus industrias nacientes o cuando consideren necesario para su desarrollo interno y el bienestar de su población.
12. Comercio protegiendo a los servicios básicos como derechos humanos. El reconocimiento del derecho soberano de los países al control de sus servicios según sus prioridades de desarrollo nacional y proveer de servicios básicos y estratégicos directamente a través del Estado o en inversiones mixtas con los países socios.
En oposición al TLC que promueve la privatización de los servicios básicos del agua, la educación, la salud, el transporte, las comunicaciones y la energía, el TCP promueve y fortalece el rol del Estado en estos servicios esenciales que hacen al pleno cumplimiento de los derechos humanos.
13. Cooperación para el desarrollo de los diferentes sectores de servicios. Prioridad a la cooperación dirigida al desarrollo de capacidades estructurales de los países, buscando soluciones sociales en sectores como la salud y la educación, entre otros. Reconocimiento del derecho soberano de los países al control y la regulación de todos los sectores de servicios buscando promover a sus empresas de servicios nacionales. Promoción de la cooperación entre países para el desarrollo de los diferentes sectores de servicios antes que el impulso a la libre competencia desleal entre empresas de servicios de diferente escala.
14. Respeto y cooperación a través de las Compras Públicas. Las compras públicas son una herramienta de planificación para el desarrollo y de promoción de la producción nacional que debe ser fortalecida a través de la cooperación participación y la ejecución conjunta de compras cuando resulte conveniente.
15. Ejecución de inversiones conjuntas en materia comercial que puedan adoptar la forma de empresas grannacionales. La asociación de empresas estatales de diferentes países para impulsar un desarrollo soberano y de beneficio mutuo.
16. Socios y no patrones La exigencia a que la inversión extranjera respete las leyes nacionales. A diferencia de los TLCs que imponen una serie de ventajas y garantías a favor de las transnacionales, el TCP busca una inversión extranjera que respete las leyes, reinvierta las utilidades y resuelva cualquier controversia con el Estado al igual que cualquier inversionista nacional.
Los inversionistas extranjeros no podrán demandar a los Estados Nacionales ni a los Gobiernos por desarrollar políticas de interés público
17. Comercio que respeta la vida. Mientras los TLCs promueve el patentamiento de la biodiversidad y del genoma humano, el TCP los protege como patrimonio común de la humanidad y la madre tierra.
18. La anteposición del derecho al desarrollo y a la salud a la propiedad intelectual e industrial. A diferencia de los TLCs que buscan patentar y ampliar la duración de la patente de invenciones que son fundamentales para la salud humana, la preservación de la madre tierra y el crecimiento de los países en desarrollo, -muchas de las cuáles han sido realizadas con fondos o subvenciones publicas- el TCP ante pone el derecho al desarrollo y a la salud antes que la propiedad intelectual de las transnacionales.
19. Adopción de mecanismos que conlleven a la independencia monetaria y financiera. Impulso a mecanismos que ayuden a fortalecer la soberanía monetaria, financiera, y la complementariedad en esta materia entre los países.
20. Protección de los derechos de los trabajadores y los derechos de los pueblos indígenas. Promoción de la vigencia plena de los mismos y la sanción a la empresa y no al país que los incumple.
21. Publicación de las negociaciones comerciales a fin de que el pueblo pueda ejercer su papel protagónico y participativo en el comercio. Nada de negociaciones secretas y a espaldas de la población.
22.       La calidad como la acumulación social de conocimiento, y su aplicación en la producción en función de la satisfacción de las necesidades sociales de los pueblos, según un nuevo concepto de calidad en el marco del ALBA-TCP para que los estándares no se conviertan en obstáculos a la producción y al intercambio comercial entre los pueblos.
23. La libre movilidad de las personas como un derecho humano. El TCP reafirma el derecho a la libre movilidad humana, con el objeto de fortalecer los lazos de hermandad entre todos los países del mundo.
VII CUMBRE DE JEFES DE ESTADO Y DE GOBIERNO DE LA
ALIANZA BOLIVARIANA PARA LOS PUEBLOS DE NUESTRA AMERICA (ALBA –TCP)
(Cochabamba, 17 de octubre de 2009)
Cochabamba, case 15 al 17 de 2009
Hacia la fundación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del “ALBA – TCP”


Durante muchos años nuestros pueblos y naciones originarias fueron saqueados permanentemente y reducidos a simples colonias por los países más poderosos del mundo, advice quienes en su afán de acumulación de riqueza invadieron nuestros territorios, se adueñaron de nuestras riquezas, culturas, conciencias, enajenando nuestro trabajo y ofendiendo a nuestra madre tierra (pachamama) depredando los recursos que existe en ella en pos de lucro desmedido.
En los 80 una inmensa deuda externa imposible de pagar nos postró aun más en la pobreza y la miseria, volviendo a generarse la violencia institucional que ya se había vivido con la militarización de nuestros pueblos, la desaparición y la tortura de nuestros familiares y el sometimiento de nuestras naciones indígenas originarias campesinas.
A lo anterior, ya en la etapa neoliberal, se añaden en el marco del capitalismo transnacional y globalizado los inhumanos procesos de desnacionalización y la sumisión absoluta de los gobiernos neoliberales a los dictados del Fondo Monetario Internacional y del Banco Mundial.
Todo esto ha hecho que la voluntad popular no signifique nada en el esquema del pensamiento de las transnacionales, de la explotación y el crimen, recordándonos permanentemente que la era de colonización de nuestros pueblos aún no ha terminado.
La intromisión del imperialismo yanqui en la historia de nuestros pueblos como ocurrió con países como Colombia, Haití, México, Puerto Rico, Nicaragua, Argentina, Ecuador, Venezuela, Bolivia, entre otros, con el pretexto de luchar contra el “terrorismo” o el “narcotráfico” ha expoliado nuestros recursos y ha empobrecido a nuestra gente; igual que los colonizadores de la “cruz y la espada” se ha apoderado de nuestras riquezas y ha dañado el medio ambiente.
La desigualdad económica, política y social, al igual que la exclusión y la discriminación son producto del neoliberalismo y el colonialismo de larga data, que debilitaron a los Estados y supeditaron el bienestar de nuestros pueblos a los designios de las organizaciones multinacionales y a los intereses de las empresas trasnacionales. La capacidad destructiva del sistema de dominación imperialista es aterradora, el desempleo aumenta y la esperanza de vida desciende; ellos mismos se encuentran ahora sumidos en una crisis sistémica cuya resolución no puede ser a costa del bienestar de nuestros pueblos.
Los movimientos sociales, expresión de las organizaciones indígenas originarias, afro descendientes, campesinas, organizaciones sindicales, juveniles, gremiales, los maestros, los obreros, los sin tierra, los productores cocaleros, las juntas de vecinos, profesionales progresistas y otros que luchan no solo por reivindicaciones salariales, sino también por la vida y el respeto a la madre tierra, desde antes, y desde siempre fueron los verdaderos artífices de la revolución y de las transformaciones profundas.
No olvidemos que los movimientos sociales hemos jugado un papel central en los últimos años en la perspectiva de una democratización y descolonización profunda de nuestros países, por un cambio sustantivo y genuinamente transformador tanto en lo económico, como en lo superestructural de nuestra Abya Yala.
Recordemos que el 14 de diciembre de 2004, Cuba y Venezuela proponen dar inicio e impulsar el ALBA, como alternativa al ALCA, que permita a nuestros pueblos y naciones avanzar políticamente en la búsqueda de una verdadera y libre integración, basada en la solidaridad, que responda a las necesidades sociales, políticas, educativas, culturales, económicas, reconociendo las luchas históricas de los pueblos latinoamericanos y caribeños por su unidad y soberanía.
En noviembre de 2005, en el marco de la Cumbre de las Américas en Mar del Plata, se da la simbólica derrota del ALCA que fue organizada por la Alianza Social Continental, como aporte a la integración.
Meses después en enero de 2006, en el marco del capítulo del Foro Social Mundial, el Presidente Chávez se reúne con Movimientos Sociales y plantea la necesidad de la creación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del Alba.
El año 2006, en Lima Perú se lleva a cabo la Cumbre Enlazando Alternativas, paralela a la Cumbre de Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de América Latina y la Unión Europea, en la que se avanza en la articulación de los Movimientos Sociales en el marco del proceso de integración latinoamericana.
Más tarde en noviembre del 2006, en la ciudad de Cochabamba, Bolivia, se celebra la Cumbre Social por la integración de los Pueblos, paralela a la Cumbre Presidencial de la Comunidad Suramericana de Naciones (CSN). Fue organizada por la Alianza Social Continental, como aporte a la integración en el marco de una gran movilización de los movimientos sociales, originarios y originarios del país.
En la V Cumbre del ALBA celebrada en abril de 2007 se lanza la declaración de Tintorero donde se aprueba la creación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA.
Después en noviembre de 2007, en la II Reunión de la Comisión Política del ALBA, el Consejo de Ministros decide que cada país miembro debe crear su capítulo nacional en el marco de la conformación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA, y que los integrantes de dicho capítulo acordaran la forma y metodología para el funcionamiento de dicho Consejo, así como la invitación a otros movimientos sociales de países extra-ALBA a participar en el mismo.
En ese mismo año, se expande la Alternativa Bolivariana a partir de la formación de las casas del ALBA a países no integrados al ALBA con la participación de las organizaciones sociales de esos países, entre ellos en Perú.
Posteriormente en enero del año 2008, en Caracas se celebra la VI Cumbre del ALBA, donde se aprueba la estrategia para el Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA, incluyendo sus principios, estructura y funciones, además se acuerda darle continuidad a dos acciones pendientes aprobadas en Tintorero, que son:
– Identificar en el ámbito Latinoamericano y caribeño, organizaciones, redes y campañas sub-regionales y regionales, nacionales y locales, en países extra-ALBA que puedan ser convocadas para formar parte del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales”.
– Realizar reunión constitutiva del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales”.
El complejo proceso de organización de la institucionalidad del ALBA-TCP como mecanismo de integración, las realidades y desafíos que han vivido algunos de los procesos políticos de los países miembros (Bolivia, Venezuela), otras prioridades y esfuerzos dentro del ALBA-TCP y criterios de países miembros han determinado que esta iniciativa esté pospuesta desde esa fecha (Aún en febrero de este año, 2009, la Comisión Política acordó “establecer un plazo a la creación de los capítulos nacionales de movimientos sociales y comunicar a la coordinación permanente del ALBA los detalles al respecto antes de finales de abril de 2009. Ello con el fin de promover la instalación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA el primero de mayo de 2009”).
Y es en este contexto que en julio de 2008 el MST y las organizaciones de la Vía Campesina Brasil, en diálogo con otras organizaciones del continente, convocan a sendos encuentros en la Escuela Nacional Florestán Fernández (MST) con un grupo sustantivo de líderes y operadores políticos de movimientos y organizaciones sociales, para, con todos estos antecedentes, llamar a un proceso de construcción de una articulación hemisférica de movimientos y organizaciones sociales en torno a los principios del ALBA y sus iniciativas. Resultado de esta reunión es la Carta de los Movimientos Sociales de las Américas que fue lanzada en la Asamblea de Movimientos Sociales, en ocasión del III Foro Social de las Américas (Guatemala, octubre 2008).
En enero de 2009, como parte de las actividades del VIII FSM 2009, celebrado en Belem de Pará, Brasil, se reunieron en la Asamblea de Movimientos Sociales, representantes de centenares de organizaciones y movimientos de todos los países de las Américas, que se identifican con el proceso de construcción del ALBA, para aprobar esta carta en su versión definitiva: Carta de los Movimientos Sociales de las Américas. Construyendo la integración de los pueblos desde abajo. Impulsando el ALBA y la solidaridad de los pueblos, frente al proyecto del imperialismo.
Recientemente en septiembre de este año, en Sao Paulo se realiza una Convocatoria a los Movimientos Sociales de Las Américas con el objetivo de articular el proceso de construcción del ALBA a partir de los Movimientos Sociales.
Con este recuento no solo reflejamos el camino recorrido en este proceso de integración hasta la fecha, sino que los alentamos a reflexionar y construir desde nuestra historia común.
En efecto lo que estamos viviendo en América Latina es parte de un proceso abarcador de reapropiación social de nuestro destino, de nuevas formas de organización política, horizontal, de democracia directa y participativa, de una economía plural que recupere los recursos naturales en beneficio de los pueblos, de una construcción de nuevas relaciones sociales armónicas, solidarias y comunitarias de producción.
Ahora con una fuerza inusitada surge en América y el mundo el grito de libertad, de lucha por la recuperación de nuestro territorio, de nuestras libertades, de nuestra soberanía; miles de hermanos se sumaron a la causa revolucionaria para liberar la patria, miles de ellos ofrendaron sus vidas en este intento, en diferentes épocas y de diferentes maneras, mártires de la revolución fueron los Tupac Katari, Tupac Amaru, Bartolina Sisa, Manuela Saenz, Apiaguayki Tumpa, Juana Azurduy de Padilla, Santos Pariamo, Marcelo Quiroga Santa Cruz, Inti Peredo, Lempira el héroe de la revolución hondureña, el libertador Simón Bolívar, Augusto Cesar Sandino, José Martí, Ernesto Che Guevara, Salvador Allende. Luis Espinal y actualmente los cinco patriotas cubanos que purgan condenas perpetúas por el solo hecho de luchar contra el terrorismo, contra el imperialismo.
Esta Primera Cumbre del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales en el marco del ALBA-TCP, es una Cumbre histórica que permite la participación directa de los movimientos sociales en los diferentes medios de cooperación y solidaridad, a diferencia de otros mecanismos de integración de países, que nunca han considerado la participación plena de los pueblos y naciones, limitándose a meros intercambios de intereses mercantilistas que van en contra de la integración y reciprocidad de pueblos y naciones de la gran Abya Yala (latinoamericana).
En este contexto la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América y el Caribe, se constituye en un verdadero espacio de construcción de una nueva patria latinoamericana, portando la bandera de la humanidad por su definitiva emancipación. Por eso estamos dispuestos a combatir contra la explotación del hombre por el hombre, considerando que existe la latente necesidad de una “segunda independencia”.
Ésta Cumbre Internacional, es el saludo de los Movimientos Sociales de los países miembros del ALBA-TCP, a la VII Cumbre de Presidentes de la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América – Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos, que durante media década lucha por la desaparición de toda forma de dominación y explotación contra los pueblos y la construcción de relaciones de complementariedad y ayuda recíproca en procura de su desarrollo y de lograr el buen vivir.
Aquí, desde el corazón de Sudamérica, desde los pueblos combatientes, las organizaciones indígenas originarios campesinas, obreros, trabajadores, estudiantes, clase media y profesionales comprometidos con su pueblo de Venezuela, Cuba, Bolivia, Antigua y Barbuda, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Honduras, la Mancomunidad de Domínica, San Vicente y las Granadinas, aunados en el Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP, nos comprometemos a defender los principios revolucionarios del ALBA-TCP, que potencian la lucha y la resistencia contra todo tipo de explotación para construir un mundo diferente.
Nuestro objetivo como Consejo de Movimientos Sociales de los países miembros del ALBA-TCP, es la lucha por el pluralismo en nuestros países y en el mundo entero, sustentada en la armonía entre nuestros pueblos y la madre tierra para el buen vivir, en los principios morales, éticos, políticos y económicos de nuestras comunidades y barrios del campo y la ciudad. Pretendemos forjar desde el seno del pueblo una nueva Patria Social Comunitaria, descolonizada y fundada en la multidiversidad, respetuosa de las diferencias y de las particularidades sociales y regionales.
La actuación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales, estará fundamentada en los siguientes principios:
– Es un espacio inclusivo, abierto, diverso y plural, a partir de la identificación con los objetivos y principios del ALBA-TCP.
– Es un espacio para compartir y desarrollar agendas comunes que beneficien a los pueblos, sin convertirnos en un espacio para dirimir disputas y representaciones políticas.
– Es un espacio para fortalecer posiciones políticas económicas y sociales, sin convertirnos en un foro o asamblea de actuación social, que reconoce los espacios de articulación existentes.
– Significa el compromiso de la plena identificación con los principios generales que definen el ALBA-TCP como proceso de integración.
– Expresa la legitimidad y representación real de los Movimientos Sociales que se integran.
– En países miembros, sostener permanente diálogo e interrelación con sus respectivos gobiernos.
– Cada Coordinación Nacional en los países miembros del ALBA-TCP, definirá sus propias dinámicas de actuación y de relacionamiento con sus gobiernos.
– En países miembros del ALBA-TCP, los vínculos de las organizaciones sociales con el CMS, se desarrollará a través de las Coordinaciones Nacionales.
– Integrar el enfoque de género, reconociendo el legítimo derecho de la participación de la mujer en los movimientos sociales con equidad, igualdad real y justicia social.
Los pueblos de América Latina que pertenecemos a la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América Latina y el Caribe – Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos, organizados en este Consejo, continuaremos luchando contra los constantes intentos del imperialismo norteamericano de privarnos del desarrollo económico pleno; ni los ataques, amedrentamientos, armas, utilización de la violencia podrán callarnos, seguiremos luchando y siendo solidarios ahora particularmente con el pueblo hermano de Honduras.
Estamos convencidos de que sólo con la organización, movilización y la unidad de los pueblos del ALBA-TCP, es posible un auténtico proceso de integración, como también el logro de la transformación económica, social, política y cultural de nuestros países.
Esta Cumbre reafirma la voluntad de Bolivia, Venezuela, Cuba, Antigua y Barbuda, San Vicente y las Granadinas, Nicaragua, Honduras, Ecuador y la Mancomunidad de Dominica por el desarrollo y el fortalecimiento del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales sobre la base de una solidaridad comprometida con los demás pueblos del continente; optamos por la lucha plural, democrática, antifascista y antiimperialista, a través de un trabajo con objetivos políticos que no escondan su naturaleza ni su carácter revolucionario.
La conformación de este Consejo de Movimientos Sociales nos permite salir de las luchas locales y aisladas, de nuestras fronteras nacionales para integrarnos en la dimensión del AbyaYala o patria latinoamericana, permite la complementariedad y participación de los pueblos en los diferentes Consejos y Grupos de Trabajo que son las instancias de unificación que funcionan en el marco de la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América Latina y el Caribe.
Para lo cual se conforma un comité ad hoc, que coordinara Bolivia, y será integrado por un representante de los tres capítulos nacionales ya creados (Bolivia, Venezuela y Cuba) y otras importantes organizaciones, redes y campañas para impulsar el proceso de constitución del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP en seis meses.
Es dado en la ciudad de Cochabamba, a los 16 días del mes octubre de 2009.
______________________________
PROPUESTA DE ACCION
– Consolidación de los capítulos nacionales con organizaciones representativas de los movimientos sociales.
– Incorporar a los movimientos sociales de los países del ALBA en el Exterior. Así como organizaciones sociales presentes en los países Miembros del ALBA.
– Crear espacios de discusión para evaluar actividades de los movimientos sociales y desarrollar programas comunes.
– Que los movimientos sociales realicen actividades de solidaridad de manera conjunta.
– Saludamos las iniciativas de Vía Campesina, MST y otras organizaciones, propuestas en septiembre de 2009 en Sao Paulo, en la perspectiva de fortalecer la articulación de los movimientos sociales del continente. En específico, nos sumamos a la iniciativa de la realización de una Asamblea Continental de Movimientos Sociales con el ALBA, para el primer semestre del 2010.
– Fortalecer los programas de desarrollo, participación y asistencia a través de los movimientos sociales.
– Asignación presupuestaria a los movimientos sociales
– Privilegiar el proceso de participación de la mujer en la dirección de los movimientos sociales.
– Incorporación de manera progresiva a organizaciones comunitarias pequeñas con igualdad de derecho de participación.
– Luchar por los derechos de los inmigrantes a un trabajo digno y a la salud.
– Impulsar la participación de los movimientos sociales de los países cuyos gobiernos no son integrantes formales del ALBA como forma de globalizar la lucha.
– Los programas de los movimientos sociales deben ser entregados a los Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de los Países del ALBA a través de resoluciones para su aprobación.
– Los “10 mandamientos para salvar la vida y el planeta, la humanidad y la vida” propuesto por el Presidente Evo Morales deben ser adoptados como principios fundamentales de los movimientos sociales.
– Cada capítulo nacional debe establecer sus programas que respondan a las necesidades reales de los pueblos.
– Establecer mecanismos de comunicación permanente entre los movimientos sociales y los pueblos y naciones indígenas originarias campesinas, donde se compartan las experiencias del proceso en cada país.
– Desarrollar programas de formación para los voceros de los movimientos sociales.
– Crear una red de medios de comunicación e información propios de los movimientos sociales.
– Luchar y demandar el derecho de los pueblos a la paz y a su autodeterminación.
– Invitar a las Nacionalidades y pueblos indígenas; a las comunidades del campo y de la ciudad; a las organizaciones populares; a los medios y redes de comunicación comunitaria y masiva; a todos y todas los habitantes del mundo, a difundir, denunciar y condenar en sus espacios; las estrategias de intervención de los Estados Unidos, a través de bases militares en Colombia, en la región, y el resto del mundo.
– Impulsar campañas en contra de las empresas transnacionales e impulsar proyectos gran nacionales promovidos por los gobiernos del ALBA A TRAVES DEL TRATADO DE COMERCIO DE LOS PUEBLOS.
– Apoyar la adopción de una moneda internacional, promovidos por los países del ALBA y la UNASUR.
– Estimular las luchas sociales para el re-ascenso del movimiento de masas.
Para lo cual se conforma un comité ad hoc, que coordinara Bolivia, y será integrado por un representante de los tres capítulos nacionales ya creados (Bolivia, Venezuela y Cuba) y otras importantes organizaciones, redes y campañas para impulsar el proceso de constitución del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP en seis meses

Dirigido a la Cumbre de la Alianza Bolivariana para los  Pueblos de Nuestra América –ALBA-

Cochabamba, 16 y 17 de octubre 2009

La ALBA es coincidente en su propuesta con principios y reivindicaciones históricas planteadas por el movimiento de mujeres. Sus principios de solidaridad, shop cooperación, reciprocidad, complementariedad, diversidad e igualdad, han sido la base de las prácticas y contribuciones económicas de las mujeres, ligadas prioritariamente a la reproducción integral de procesos y condiciones de vida, y son también el eje de nuestras visiones sobre un nuevo sistema económico. Así, la ALBA confluye con la aspiración de las mujeres latinoamericanas y caribeñas de levantar una sociedad integrada desde una perspectiva incluyente, que recoja y potencie la policroma diversidad de sus pueblos, superando injusticias y desigualdades.

Nosotras, que participamos activamente en las luchas y resistencias contra los proyectos de integración pautados por el capital, reconocemos a la ALBA como expresión de la búsqueda de un proyecto propio, en el cual los movimientos sociales y los pueblos, con nuestra participación activa, podamos contribuir y consensuar un proceso de construcción de sociedades alternativas.

Apreciamos el potencial de la ALBA para plantear un proyecto latinoamericano basado en transformaciones mayores: el socialismo del siglo XXI –que, como lo han asumido ya algunos presidentes, ‘solo podrá ser feminista’-; el paradigma del Buen Vivir / Vivir Bien y la riqueza de la plurinacionalidad, que redefinen ya los estados de algunos de sus países miembros.

Valoramos el hecho de que, en su corta vida, la ALBA registra ya logros en el terreno del intercambio solidario, en los dominios de educación, salud,  cooperación energética; es notable su proyección como espacio de concertación política y resolución de conflictos, de construcción de posiciones comunes, “en defensa de la independencia, la soberanía, la autodeterminación y la identidad de los países que la integran y de los intereses y las aspiraciones de los pueblos del Sur frente a los intentos de dominación política y económica”.

Como parte de los movimientos sociales y como protagonistas históricas de experiencias no mercantilizadas, hemos planteado, al igual que la ALBA, que nuestras sociedades se construyan sobre la base de la “unión de los pueblos, la autodeterminación, la complementariedad económica, el comercio justo, la lucha contra la pobreza, la preservación de la identidad cultural, la integración energética, la defensa del ambiente y la justicia”; desde esta coincidencia de perspectivas nos proponemos mancomunar esfuerzos para lograr los objetivos comunes de construcción de una Latinoamérica autodeterminada, solidaria, libre de relaciones patriarcales y levantada bajo los designios del Buen Vivir / Vivir Bien.

La consolidación de la ALBA como un espacio de soberanía política, económica, social, institucional, cultural, de la diversidad, de lo popular y de lo público demanda cambios de fondo en la manera de pensar, diseñar, decidir y materializar las políticas. Se trata de construir un nuevo paradigma societal, que va más allá de rediseñar el existente. Este es un reto que requiere aunar toda la inteligencia, comprensión y capacidad de diálogo entre los gobiernos de los países de la ALBA y los movimientos sociales, de manera fluida y permanente.

La creación del Consejo Ministerial de Mujeres y del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales, es paso importante para la articulación efectiva entre los gobiernos y los pueblos.  Saludamos esta decisión, a la vez que ofrecemos nuestro concurso para contribuir con el desarrollo de una perspectiva feminista en el conjunto de iniciativas y de políticas de la ALBA, como también para visualizar las medidas específicas que deberían tomarse para propiciar la igualdad de las mujeres y para erradicar el patriarcado.

Consideramos que los cambios que plantea la ALBA son alcanzables en tanto se amplíen y profundicen cambios como los que ya han emprendido algunos de nuestros países con un sentido de transformación estructural, que incluyen el reconocimiento de la diversidad económica y productiva y en ese marco la visibilización de las mujeres como actoras económicas, la equiparación entre el trabajo productivo y el reproductivo, el desarrollo de éticas de igualdad, diversidades y no violencia, el reconocimiento de la soberanía alimentaria, entre otros aspectos que podrían convertirse en punto común para todas las políticas públicas de la ALBA, colocando como eje el Buen Vivir / Vivir Bien y la sostenibilidad de la vida.

Con especial interés seguimos la propuesta de construir una Zona Económica de Desarrollo Compartido entre los países de la ALBA; consideramos que a su amparo y bajo un enfoque de economía diversa, social y solidaria, se pueden desarrollar iniciativas compartidas de soberanía alimentaria, de reconocimiento y desarrollo de los conocimientos de las mujeres,  de rescate y curaduría de las semillas nativas y de transgenosis natural, de producción y distribución cooperativa y asociativa, de generación de infraestructura y tecnologías orientadas al cuidado humano y ambiental.

La creación de núcleos de desarrollo endógeno binacionales o trinacionales, que transformen las condiciones de trabajo y empleo para las mujeres del campo y la ciudad, sería una importante experiencia de integración y preservación regional de la cultura productiva y solidaria acumulada históricamente por nuestros pueblos.
De igual manera, la creación de un Instituto de Estudios Feministas de los países de la ALBA, que organice intercambios de conocimientos y saberes entre los países, desarrolle proyectos de investigación sobre políticas públicas e internacionales, recupere los múltiples aportes de las mujeres a lo largo de nuestra historia, y juegue un papel activo en la generación de propuestas y desarrollo de asesorías a los gobiernos en esta materia, contribuirá significativamente al fortalecimiento de nuestro proceso de cambio regional.

La ALBA es un espacio privilegiado para el impulso de un proyecto de integración alternativo que no debe repetir el déficit democrático de las propuestas precedentes. La participación en la concepción, diseño y ejecución de proyectos debe ser una divisa, por ello proponemos, como forma inicial de materialización de esa participación, que en la  instancia técnica del Consejo Social encargada de elaborar estudios, preparar propuestas y formular proyectos relacionados con las políticas sociales de la ALBA, así como de coordinar y darles seguimiento, se contemple la participación paritaria de las mujeres, la misma que deberá hacerse extensiva a todas las instancias, incluidas aquellas de decisión, gestión y representación.

La ALBA tiene la particularidad de reunir a países de la Región Andina, Centroamérica y el Caribe, con problemáticas comunes y diferentes en materia de salud y vulnerabilidad frente a los fenómenos climáticos. Sería pertinente la creación de redes de intercambio y ayuda de las organizaciones de mujeres ante situaciones de emergencia epidemiológica y catástrofes naturales.

Si bien el surgimiento y desarrollo de la ALBA ha sido un factor reconfortante en la senda de nuestras luchas, persisten en el mundo y en la región tendencias y procesos que constituyen zonas de riesgo y/o amenazas para los procesos de cambio, ante los cuales debemos permanecer alerta y desplegar toda la capacidad en defensa de nuestros procesos de transformación.  Declarar a los países de la ALBA como territorios de paz y libres de bases militares extrajeras es una propuesta de gran coherencia y defensa de la soberanía.

Con preocupación vemos el avance en la región de un modelo de crecimiento focalizado en megaproyectos, que avanzan sin el consentimiento de los pueblos y atentan contra sus derechos, soberanía y autodeterminación.  El auge de monumentales obras de infraestructura bajo el amparo de proyectos como IIRSA y el Plan Mesoamérica, involucran a países de toda América Latina, incluso países de la ALBA. Tales obras son el sustento para la profundización y ampliación de economías de enclave, basadas en la racionalidad extractivista, deprededadora en su relación con la naturaleza y reproductora de las condiciones de relegamiento de nuestros pueblos. Estas obras tienen un notorio impacto sobre las mujeres, en especial las indígenas, comprometen la soberanía alimentaria de esas localidades y alteran la geografía, los ecosistemas y los patrones de consumo tradicional; algunas de ellas abren paso a la depredación de los recursos localizados en la Amazonía y en los bosques tropicales de Centroamérica.

Creemos que es urgente que los gobiernos de la ALBA consideren colectivamente una crítica y distanciamiento de tales iniciativas del capitalismo neoliberal y asuman, sin ambigüedades, un nuevo enfoque de desarrollo congruente con la propuesta del Buen Vivir / Vivir Bien y con el proceso de cambios y estructurales que la ALBA conlleva.
Con inquietud hemos visto, asimismo, el relanzamiento del Fondo Monetario Internacional en varios foros internacionales, como instancia reguladora frente a la actual crisis; resulta ofensivo hacia nuestros pueblos ignorar la responsabilidad de esa institución no sólo en las dinámicas que condujeron a la propia crisis, sino también en la aplicación de las políticas neoliberales que aún nos afectan duramente.  Ratificamos nuestra convicción, expresada en el último Foro Social Mundial (Belém 2009), de que el enfrentamiento a la crisis demanda alternativas anticapitalistas, antirracistas,  anti-imperialistas, socialistas, feministas y ecologistas.

Es igualmente preocupante que se mantengan injustificadas expectativas en que la conclusión de la Ronda Doha de la OMC pueda resolver los problemas de acceso al mercado para los países ‘en desarrollo’. Los pueblos reclamamos el comercio justo y solidario frente al libre comercio; la apertura indiscriminada de nuestros mercados desplazó a las y los productores locales, la sustitución de importaciones fue demonizada para abrir nuestros mercados a los productos importados, la competencia se impuso a la lógica de la complementariedad y cooperación regional.

La ALBA es un espacio invaluable para el rescate y el desarrollo de las producciones locales que fortalezcan las relaciones entre los pueblos y favorezcan formas de gestión colectiva, definida en torno al interés social y a los derechos de la naturaleza, por lo mismo debería extender la influencia de su filosofía a los acuerdos internacionales  con otras regiones.

La ALBA es un espacio privilegiado para la construcción de soberanía financiera. Recuperar el control sobre nuestros ahorros y recursos financieros y reorientar su utilización hacia nuestros objetivos estratégicos, con criterios de democratización y redistribución es fundamental. Resalta como mecanismo el Banco de la ALBA, que puede ser uno de los puntales para desarrollo de iniciativas económicas de carácter social y solidario de alcance regional, nacional y local, que se fundamenten en visiones de complementariedad entre los países y de justicia de género, integrando medidas eficaces para asegurar el acceso de las mujeres a los recursos y a la toma de decisiones. En igual sentido valoramos la importancia de la adopción del SUCRE como medio de intercambio soberano y eficaz en el comercio internacional entre nuestros países.

Finalmente, es un desafío común para los países de la ALBA avanzar en políticas y medidas conjuntas para:

Reconocer, dentro de las modalidades de trabajo, a las labores de autosustento y cuidado humano no remunerado que se realiza en los hogares. Los Estados deberían comprometerse a facilitar servicios e infraestructura para la atención pública y comunitaria de las necesidades básicas de todos los grupos dependientes (niñas/os, personas con discapacidad, adultas/os mayores), definir horarios de trabajo adecuados, impulsando la corresponsabilidad y reciprocidad de hombres y mujeres en el trabajo doméstico y en las obligaciones familiares, así como extender la seguridad social a quienes hacen esas labores.

Impulsar reformas agrarias integrales y sostenibles, con una visión holística de la tierra como fuente de vida, que propicien la diversidad económica y productiva, la redistribución y la prohibición del latifundio.

Impulsar la integración energética de América Latina y El Caribe bajo los principios del Buen Vivir / Vivir Bien, priorizando dentro de las estrategias de cooperación, proyectos de generación de energías limpias para fortalecer las capacidades de las pequeñas unidades productivas y las condiciones de vida de las poblaciones más empobrecidas.

ALBA, un nuevo amanecer para nuestros pueblos
con igualdad para las mujeres!

Red Latinoamericana Mujeres Transformando la Economía –REMTE-
Articulación de Mujeres de la CLOC- Vía Campesina
Federación de Mujeres Cubanas
Federación Democrática Internacional de Mujeres
FEDAEPS


Declaración de la VII Cumbre del ALBA – TCP

4 y 5 de Diciembre 2006, previa a la II Cumbre de de la Comunidad Sudamérica de Naciones, clinic cincuenta lideres y lideresas indígenas de nueve países suramericanos discutieron en Cochabamba sobre la integración suramericana. Posteriormente,
del 6 a 9 de Diciembre, y en paralelo a la Cumbre presidencial se organizó la Cumbre Social por la Integración de los Pueblos. La Cumbre Social por la Integración de los Pueblos fue un espacio único de participación y dialogo entre actores gubernamentales y de la sociedad civil. Como resultado, 13 sesiones temáticas formularon propuestas para la institucionalidad de la integración suramericana. Una de estas sesiones fue la Sesión de los Pueblos Indígenas y Naciones Originarios, en la cuál los líderes mencionados anteriormente tuvieron un papel protagonista. Muchos de ellos y ellas forman parte de la Coordinadora Andina de Organizaciones Indígenas (CAOI). Estos eventos y posteriores actividades de la sociedad civil Suramericana dirigidas a “Otra Suramérica posible”, y específicamente las acciones referidas a la integración Suramericana que implementó la CAOI entre el inicio de 2007 y mayo 2009, forman la base de este documento. El libro analiza los procesos de la integración Suramericana desde una perspectiva amplia, relacionándoles a los procesos de la integración interamericano, latinoamericano, y regional (por ejemplo Andes, Amazonía, Cono Sur). Asimismo, partiendo de las propuestas de la sociedad civil ya formuladas, particularmente las de CAOI, el libro elabora algunas ideas para una posible institucionalidad suramericana Específicamente, el libro argumenta que la integración suramericana debe tener un carácter propio continental incluyendo los pensamientos andino-amazónicos y respetando los derechos humanos y de la naturaleza. En este sentido, se describen los crecientes impactos sociales y ambientales de la Iniciativa para la Integración de la Infraestructura Regional Sudamericana (IIRSA) y se discuten varios hitos importantes referidos a la integración suramericana: por ejemplo la construcción de la Unión de las Naciones Suramericanas (UNASUR), y la construcción del Banco del Sur. Integración es la construcción de múltiples puentes. Por lo tanto adicionalmente se estudian diferentes corrientes políticas y filosóficas que tienen un papel importante en la construcción de la integración suramericana y las posibilidades de seducir a los sectores que tienen diferentes opiniones, para definir como se puede tener una articulación que óptimamente podrá contribuir a una integración suramericana que de un lado promueva acciones económicas, sociales, culturales y ambientales conjuntas a nivel de América del Sur para el bienestar de su población y su naturaleza y de otro lado promueva un papel protagonista de Suramérica en la confrontación de las crisis a nivel global.

4 y 5 de Diciembre 2006, previa a la II Cumbre de de la Comunidad Sudamérica de Naciones, hospital cincuenta lideres y lideresas indígenas de nueve países suramericanos discutieron en Cochabamba sobre la integración suramericana. Posteriormente, del 6 a 9 de Diciembre, y en paralelo a la Cumbre presidencial se organizó la Cumbre Social por la Integración de los Pueblos. La Cumbre Social por la Integración de los Pueblos fue un espacio único de participación y dialogo entre actores gubernamentales y de la sociedad civil. Como resultado, 13 sesiones temáticas formularon propuestas para la institucionalidad de la integración suramericana. Una de estas sesiones fue la Sesión de los Pueblos Indígenas y Naciones Originarios, en la cuál los líderes mencionados anteriormente tuvieron un papel protagonista. Muchos de ellos y ellas forman parte de la Coordinadora Andina de Organizaciones Indígenas (CAOI). Estos eventos y posteriores actividades de la sociedad civil Suramericana dirigidas a “Otra Suramérica posible”, y específicamente las acciones referidas a la integración Suramericana que implementó la CAOI entre el inicio de 2007 y mayo 2009, forman la base de este documento. El libro analiza los procesos de la integración Suramericana desde una perspectiva amplia, relacionándoles a los procesos de la integración interamericano, latinoamericano, y regional (por ejemplo Andes, Amazonía, Cono Sur). Asimismo, partiendo de las propuestas de la sociedad civil ya formuladas, particularmente las de CAOI, el libro elabora algunas ideas para una posible institucionalidad suramericana Específicamente, el libro argumenta que la integración suramericana debe tener un carácter propio continental incluyendo los pensamientos andino-amazónicos y respetando los derechos humanos y de la naturaleza. En este sentido, se describen los crecientes impactos sociales y ambientales de la Iniciativa para la Integración de la Infraestructura Regional Sudamericana (IIRSA) y se discuten varios hitos importantes referidos a la integración suramericana: por ejemplo la construcción de la Unión de las Naciones Suramericanas (UNASUR), y la construcción del Banco del Sur. Integración es la construcción de múltiples puentes. Por lo tanto adicionalmente se estudian diferentes corrientes políticas y filosóficas que tienen un papel importante en la construcción de la integración suramericana y las posibilidades de seducir a los sectores que tienen diferentes opiniones, para definir como se puede tener una articulación que óptimamente podrá contribuir a una integración suramericana que de un lado promueva acciones económicas, sociales, culturales y ambientales conjuntas a nivel de América del Sur para el bienestar de su población y su naturaleza y de otro lado promueva un papel protagonista de Suramérica en la confrontación de las crisis a nivel global.


Download Full PDF

4 y 5 de Diciembre 2006, store previa a la II Cumbre de de la Comunidad Sudamérica de Naciones, cincuenta lideres y lideresas indígenas de nueve países suramericanos discutieron en Cochabamba sobre la integración suramericana. Posteriormente, del 6 a 9 de Diciembre, y en paralelo a la Cumbre presidencial se organizó la Cumbre Social por la Integración de los Pueblos. La Cumbre Social por la Integración de los Pueblos fue un espacio único de participación y dialogo entre actores gubernamentales y de la sociedad civil. Como resultado, 13 sesiones temáticas formularon propuestas para la institucionalidad de la integración suramericana. Una de estas sesiones fue la Sesión de los Pueblos Indígenas y Naciones Originarios, en la cuál los líderes mencionados anteriormente tuvieron un papel protagonista. Muchos de ellos y ellas forman parte de la Coordinadora Andina de Organizaciones Indígenas (CAOI). Estos eventos y posteriores actividades de la sociedad civil Suramericana dirigidas a “Otra Suramérica posible”, y específicamente las acciones referidas a la integración Suramericana que implementó la CAOI entre el inicio de 2007 y mayo 2009, forman la base de este documento. El libro analiza los procesos de la integración Suramericana desde una perspectiva amplia, relacionándoles a los procesos de la integración interamericano, latinoamericano, y regional (por ejemplo Andes, Amazonía, Cono Sur). Asimismo, partiendo de las propuestas de la sociedad civil ya formuladas, particularmente las de CAOI, el libro elabora algunas ideas para una posible institucionalidad suramericana Específicamente, el libro argumenta que la integración suramericana debe tener un carácter propio continental incluyendo los pensamientos andino-amazónicos y respetando los derechos humanos y de la naturaleza. En este sentido, se describen los crecientes impactos sociales y ambientales de la Iniciativa para la Integración de la Infraestructura Regional Sudamericana (IIRSA) y se discuten varios hitos importantes referidos a la integración suramericana: por ejemplo la construcción de la Unión de las Naciones Suramericanas (UNASUR), y la construcción del Banco del Sur. Integración es la construcción de múltiples puentes. Por lo tanto adicionalmente se estudian diferentes corrientes políticas y filosóficas que tienen un papel importante en la construcción de la integración suramericana y las posibilidades de seducir a los sectores que tienen diferentes opiniones, para definir como se puede tener una articulación que óptimamente podrá contribuir a una integración suramericana que de un lado promueva acciones económicas, sociales, culturales y ambientales conjuntas a nivel de América del Sur para el bienestar de su población y su naturaleza y de otro lado promueva un papel protagonista de Suramérica en la confrontación de las crisis a nivel global.


Download Full PDF

Cochabamba, find 15 al 17 de 2009
Hacia la fundación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del “ALBA – TCP”


Durante muchos años nuestros pueblos y naciones originarias fueron saqueados permanentemente y reducidos a simples colonias por los países más poderosos del mundo, sildenafil quienes en su afán de acumulación de riqueza invadieron nuestros territorios, se adueñaron de nuestras riquezas, culturas, conciencias, enajenando nuestro trabajo y ofendiendo a nuestra madre tierra (pachamama) depredando los recursos que existe en ella en pos de lucro desmedido.
En los 80 una inmensa deuda externa imposible de pagar nos postró aun más en la pobreza y la miseria, volviendo a generarse la violencia institucional que ya se había vivido con la militarización de nuestros pueblos, la desaparición y la tortura de nuestros familiares y el sometimiento de nuestras naciones indígenas originarias campesinas.
A lo anterior, ya en la etapa neoliberal, se añaden en el marco del capitalismo transnacional y globalizado los inhumanos procesos de desnacionalización y la sumisión absoluta de los gobiernos neoliberales a los dictados del Fondo Monetario Internacional y del Banco Mundial.
Todo esto ha hecho que la voluntad popular no signifique nada en el esquema del pensamiento de las transnacionales, de la explotación y el crimen, recordándonos permanentemente que la era de colonización de nuestros pueblos aún no ha terminado.
La intromisión del imperialismo yanqui en la historia de nuestros pueblos como ocurrió con países como Colombia, Haití, México, Puerto Rico, Nicaragua, Argentina, Ecuador, Venezuela, Bolivia, entre otros, con el pretexto de luchar contra el “terrorismo” o el “narcotráfico” ha expoliado nuestros recursos y ha empobrecido a nuestra gente; igual que los colonizadores de la “cruz y la espada” se ha apoderado de nuestras riquezas y ha dañado el medio ambiente.
La desigualdad económica, política y social, al igual que la exclusión y la discriminación son producto del neoliberalismo y el colonialismo de larga data, que debilitaron a los Estados y supeditaron el bienestar de nuestros pueblos a los designios de las organizaciones multinacionales y a los intereses de las empresas trasnacionales. La capacidad destructiva del sistema de dominación imperialista es aterradora, el desempleo aumenta y la esperanza de vida desciende; ellos mismos se encuentran ahora sumidos en una crisis sistémica cuya resolución no puede ser a costa del bienestar de nuestros pueblos.
Los movimientos sociales, expresión de las organizaciones indígenas originarias, afro descendientes, campesinas, organizaciones sindicales, juveniles, gremiales, los maestros, los obreros, los sin tierra, los productores cocaleros, las juntas de vecinos, profesionales progresistas y otros que luchan no solo por reivindicaciones salariales, sino también por la vida y el respeto a la madre tierra, desde antes, y desde siempre fueron los verdaderos artífices de la revolución y de las transformaciones profundas.
No olvidemos que los movimientos sociales hemos jugado un papel central en los últimos años en la perspectiva de una democratización y descolonización profunda de nuestros países, por un cambio sustantivo y genuinamente transformador tanto en lo económico, como en lo superestructural de nuestra Abya Yala.
Recordemos que el 14 de diciembre de 2004, Cuba y Venezuela proponen dar inicio e impulsar el ALBA, como alternativa al ALCA, que permita a nuestros pueblos y naciones avanzar políticamente en la búsqueda de una verdadera y libre integración, basada en la solidaridad, que responda a las necesidades sociales, políticas, educativas, culturales, económicas, reconociendo las luchas históricas de los pueblos latinoamericanos y caribeños por su unidad y soberanía.
En noviembre de 2005, en el marco de la Cumbre de las Américas en Mar del Plata, se da la simbólica derrota del ALCA que fue organizada por la Alianza Social Continental, como aporte a la integración.
Meses después en enero de 2006, en el marco del capítulo del Foro Social Mundial, el Presidente Chávez se reúne con Movimientos Sociales y plantea la necesidad de la creación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del Alba.
El año 2006, en Lima Perú se lleva a cabo la Cumbre Enlazando Alternativas, paralela a la Cumbre de Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de América Latina y la Unión Europea, en la que se avanza en la articulación de los Movimientos Sociales en el marco del proceso de integración latinoamericana.
Más tarde en noviembre del 2006, en la ciudad de Cochabamba, Bolivia, se celebra la Cumbre Social por la integración de los Pueblos, paralela a la Cumbre Presidencial de la Comunidad Suramericana de Naciones (CSN). Fue organizada por la Alianza Social Continental, como aporte a la integración en el marco de una gran movilización de los movimientos sociales, originarios y originarios del país.
En la V Cumbre del ALBA celebrada en abril de 2007 se lanza la declaración de Tintorero donde se aprueba la creación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA.
Después en noviembre de 2007, en la II Reunión de la Comisión Política del ALBA, el Consejo de Ministros decide que cada país miembro debe crear su capítulo nacional en el marco de la conformación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA, y que los integrantes de dicho capítulo acordaran la forma y metodología para el funcionamiento de dicho Consejo, así como la invitación a otros movimientos sociales de países extra-ALBA a participar en el mismo.
En ese mismo año, se expande la Alternativa Bolivariana a partir de la formación de las casas del ALBA a países no integrados al ALBA con la participación de las organizaciones sociales de esos países, entre ellos en Perú.
Posteriormente en enero del año 2008, en Caracas se celebra la VI Cumbre del ALBA, donde se aprueba la estrategia para el Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA, incluyendo sus principios, estructura y funciones, además se acuerda darle continuidad a dos acciones pendientes aprobadas en Tintorero, que son:
– Identificar en el ámbito Latinoamericano y caribeño, organizaciones, redes y campañas sub-regionales y regionales, nacionales y locales, en países extra-ALBA que puedan ser convocadas para formar parte del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales”.
– Realizar reunión constitutiva del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales”.
El complejo proceso de organización de la institucionalidad del ALBA-TCP como mecanismo de integración, las realidades y desafíos que han vivido algunos de los procesos políticos de los países miembros (Bolivia, Venezuela), otras prioridades y esfuerzos dentro del ALBA-TCP y criterios de países miembros han determinado que esta iniciativa esté pospuesta desde esa fecha (Aún en febrero de este año, 2009, la Comisión Política acordó “establecer un plazo a la creación de los capítulos nacionales de movimientos sociales y comunicar a la coordinación permanente del ALBA los detalles al respecto antes de finales de abril de 2009. Ello con el fin de promover la instalación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA el primero de mayo de 2009”).
Y es en este contexto que en julio de 2008 el MST y las organizaciones de la Vía Campesina Brasil, en diálogo con otras organizaciones del continente, convocan a sendos encuentros en la Escuela Nacional Florestán Fernández (MST) con un grupo sustantivo de líderes y operadores políticos de movimientos y organizaciones sociales, para, con todos estos antecedentes, llamar a un proceso de construcción de una articulación hemisférica de movimientos y organizaciones sociales en torno a los principios del ALBA y sus iniciativas. Resultado de esta reunión es la Carta de los Movimientos Sociales de las Américas que fue lanzada en la Asamblea de Movimientos Sociales, en ocasión del III Foro Social de las Américas (Guatemala, octubre 2008).
En enero de 2009, como parte de las actividades del VIII FSM 2009, celebrado en Belem de Pará, Brasil, se reunieron en la Asamblea de Movimientos Sociales, representantes de centenares de organizaciones y movimientos de todos los países de las Américas, que se identifican con el proceso de construcción del ALBA, para aprobar esta carta en su versión definitiva: Carta de los Movimientos Sociales de las Américas. Construyendo la integración de los pueblos desde abajo. Impulsando el ALBA y la solidaridad de los pueblos, frente al proyecto del imperialismo.
Recientemente en septiembre de este año, en Sao Paulo se realiza una Convocatoria a los Movimientos Sociales de Las Américas con el objetivo de articular el proceso de construcción del ALBA a partir de los Movimientos Sociales.
Con este recuento no solo reflejamos el camino recorrido en este proceso de integración hasta la fecha, sino que los alentamos a reflexionar y construir desde nuestra historia común.
En efecto lo que estamos viviendo en América Latina es parte de un proceso abarcador de reapropiación social de nuestro destino, de nuevas formas de organización política, horizontal, de democracia directa y participativa, de una economía plural que recupere los recursos naturales en beneficio de los pueblos, de una construcción de nuevas relaciones sociales armónicas, solidarias y comunitarias de producción.
Ahora con una fuerza inusitada surge en América y el mundo el grito de libertad, de lucha por la recuperación de nuestro territorio, de nuestras libertades, de nuestra soberanía; miles de hermanos se sumaron a la causa revolucionaria para liberar la patria, miles de ellos ofrendaron sus vidas en este intento, en diferentes épocas y de diferentes maneras, mártires de la revolución fueron los Tupac Katari, Tupac Amaru, Bartolina Sisa, Manuela Saenz, Apiaguayki Tumpa, Juana Azurduy de Padilla, Santos Pariamo, Marcelo Quiroga Santa Cruz, Inti Peredo, Lempira el héroe de la revolución hondureña, el libertador Simón Bolívar, Augusto Cesar Sandino, José Martí, Ernesto Che Guevara, Salvador Allende. Luis Espinal y actualmente los cinco patriotas cubanos que purgan condenas perpetúas por el solo hecho de luchar contra el terrorismo, contra el imperialismo.
Esta Primera Cumbre del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales en el marco del ALBA-TCP, es una Cumbre histórica que permite la participación directa de los movimientos sociales en los diferentes medios de cooperación y solidaridad, a diferencia de otros mecanismos de integración de países, que nunca han considerado la participación plena de los pueblos y naciones, limitándose a meros intercambios de intereses mercantilistas que van en contra de la integración y reciprocidad de pueblos y naciones de la gran Abya Yala (latinoamericana).
En este contexto la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América y el Caribe, se constituye en un verdadero espacio de construcción de una nueva patria latinoamericana, portando la bandera de la humanidad por su definitiva emancipación. Por eso estamos dispuestos a combatir contra la explotación del hombre por el hombre, considerando que existe la latente necesidad de una “segunda independencia”.
Ésta Cumbre Internacional, es el saludo de los Movimientos Sociales de los países miembros del ALBA-TCP, a la VII Cumbre de Presidentes de la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América – Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos, que durante media década lucha por la desaparición de toda forma de dominación y explotación contra los pueblos y la construcción de relaciones de complementariedad y ayuda recíproca en procura de su desarrollo y de lograr el buen vivir.
Aquí, desde el corazón de Sudamérica, desde los pueblos combatientes, las organizaciones indígenas originarios campesinas, obreros, trabajadores, estudiantes, clase media y profesionales comprometidos con su pueblo de Venezuela, Cuba, Bolivia, Antigua y Barbuda, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Honduras, la Mancomunidad de Domínica, San Vicente y las Granadinas, aunados en el Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP, nos comprometemos a defender los principios revolucionarios del ALBA-TCP, que potencian la lucha y la resistencia contra todo tipo de explotación para construir un mundo diferente.
Nuestro objetivo como Consejo de Movimientos Sociales de los países miembros del ALBA-TCP, es la lucha por el pluralismo en nuestros países y en el mundo entero, sustentada en la armonía entre nuestros pueblos y la madre tierra para el buen vivir, en los principios morales, éticos, políticos y económicos de nuestras comunidades y barrios del campo y la ciudad. Pretendemos forjar desde el seno del pueblo una nueva Patria Social Comunitaria, descolonizada y fundada en la multidiversidad, respetuosa de las diferencias y de las particularidades sociales y regionales.
La actuación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales, estará fundamentada en los siguientes principios:
– Es un espacio inclusivo, abierto, diverso y plural, a partir de la identificación con los objetivos y principios del ALBA-TCP.
– Es un espacio para compartir y desarrollar agendas comunes que beneficien a los pueblos, sin convertirnos en un espacio para dirimir disputas y representaciones políticas.
– Es un espacio para fortalecer posiciones políticas económicas y sociales, sin convertirnos en un foro o asamblea de actuación social, que reconoce los espacios de articulación existentes.
– Significa el compromiso de la plena identificación con los principios generales que definen el ALBA-TCP como proceso de integración.
– Expresa la legitimidad y representación real de los Movimientos Sociales que se integran.
– En países miembros, sostener permanente diálogo e interrelación con sus respectivos gobiernos.
– Cada Coordinación Nacional en los países miembros del ALBA-TCP, definirá sus propias dinámicas de actuación y de relacionamiento con sus gobiernos.
– En países miembros del ALBA-TCP, los vínculos de las organizaciones sociales con el CMS, se desarrollará a través de las Coordinaciones Nacionales.
– Integrar el enfoque de género, reconociendo el legítimo derecho de la participación de la mujer en los movimientos sociales con equidad, igualdad real y justicia social.
Los pueblos de América Latina que pertenecemos a la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América Latina y el Caribe – Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos, organizados en este Consejo, continuaremos luchando contra los constantes intentos del imperialismo norteamericano de privarnos del desarrollo económico pleno; ni los ataques, amedrentamientos, armas, utilización de la violencia podrán callarnos, seguiremos luchando y siendo solidarios ahora particularmente con el pueblo hermano de Honduras.
Estamos convencidos de que sólo con la organización, movilización y la unidad de los pueblos del ALBA-TCP, es posible un auténtico proceso de integración, como también el logro de la transformación económica, social, política y cultural de nuestros países.
Esta Cumbre reafirma la voluntad de Bolivia, Venezuela, Cuba, Antigua y Barbuda, San Vicente y las Granadinas, Nicaragua, Honduras, Ecuador y la Mancomunidad de Dominica por el desarrollo y el fortalecimiento del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales sobre la base de una solidaridad comprometida con los demás pueblos del continente; optamos por la lucha plural, democrática, antifascista y antiimperialista, a través de un trabajo con objetivos políticos que no escondan su naturaleza ni su carácter revolucionario.
La conformación de este Consejo de Movimientos Sociales nos permite salir de las luchas locales y aisladas, de nuestras fronteras nacionales para integrarnos en la dimensión del AbyaYala o patria latinoamericana, permite la complementariedad y participación de los pueblos en los diferentes Consejos y Grupos de Trabajo que son las instancias de unificación que funcionan en el marco de la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América Latina y el Caribe.
Para lo cual se conforma un comité ad hoc, que coordinara Bolivia, y será integrado por un representante de los tres capítulos nacionales ya creados (Bolivia, Venezuela y Cuba) y otras importantes organizaciones, redes y campañas para impulsar el proceso de constitución del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP en seis meses.
Es dado en la ciudad de Cochabamba, a los 16 días del mes octubre de 2009.
______________________________
PROPUESTA DE ACCION
– Consolidación de los capítulos nacionales con organizaciones representativas de los movimientos sociales.
– Incorporar a los movimientos sociales de los países del ALBA en el Exterior. Así como organizaciones sociales presentes en los países Miembros del ALBA.
– Crear espacios de discusión para evaluar actividades de los movimientos sociales y desarrollar programas comunes.
– Que los movimientos sociales realicen actividades de solidaridad de manera conjunta.
– Saludamos las iniciativas de Vía Campesina, MST y otras organizaciones, propuestas en septiembre de 2009 en Sao Paulo, en la perspectiva de fortalecer la articulación de los movimientos sociales del continente. En específico, nos sumamos a la iniciativa de la realización de una Asamblea Continental de Movimientos Sociales con el ALBA, para el primer semestre del 2010.
– Fortalecer los programas de desarrollo, participación y asistencia a través de los movimientos sociales.
– Asignación presupuestaria a los movimientos sociales
– Privilegiar el proceso de participación de la mujer en la dirección de los movimientos sociales.
– Incorporación de manera progresiva a organizaciones comunitarias pequeñas con igualdad de derecho de participación.
– Luchar por los derechos de los inmigrantes a un trabajo digno y a la salud.
– Impulsar la participación de los movimientos sociales de los países cuyos gobiernos no son integrantes formales del ALBA como forma de globalizar la lucha.
– Los programas de los movimientos sociales deben ser entregados a los Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de los Países del ALBA a través de resoluciones para su aprobación.
– Los “10 mandamientos para salvar la vida y el planeta, la humanidad y la vida” propuesto por el Presidente Evo Morales deben ser adoptados como principios fundamentales de los movimientos sociales.
– Cada capítulo nacional debe establecer sus programas que respondan a las necesidades reales de los pueblos.
– Establecer mecanismos de comunicación permanente entre los movimientos sociales y los pueblos y naciones indígenas originarias campesinas, donde se compartan las experiencias del proceso en cada país.
– Desarrollar programas de formación para los voceros de los movimientos sociales.
– Crear una red de medios de comunicación e información propios de los movimientos sociales.
– Luchar y demandar el derecho de los pueblos a la paz y a su autodeterminación.
– Invitar a las Nacionalidades y pueblos indígenas; a las comunidades del campo y de la ciudad; a las organizaciones populares; a los medios y redes de comunicación comunitaria y masiva; a todos y todas los habitantes del mundo, a difundir, denunciar y condenar en sus espacios; las estrategias de intervención de los Estados Unidos, a través de bases militares en Colombia, en la región, y el resto del mundo.
– Impulsar campañas en contra de las empresas transnacionales e impulsar proyectos gran nacionales promovidos por los gobiernos del ALBA A TRAVES DEL TRATADO DE COMERCIO DE LOS PUEBLOS.
– Apoyar la adopción de una moneda internacional, promovidos por los países del ALBA y la UNASUR.
– Estimular las luchas sociales para el re-ascenso del movimiento de masas.
Para lo cual se conforma un comité ad hoc, que coordinara Bolivia, y será integrado por un representante de los tres capítulos nacionales ya creados (Bolivia, Venezuela y Cuba) y otras importantes organizaciones, redes y campañas para impulsar el proceso de constitución del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP en seis meses

Conferencia Internacional de gobiernos y movimientos sociales “Integración regional: una oportunidad frente a las crisis” (21 y 22 Julio 2009, Asunción, Paraguay)

Durante muchos años nuestros pueblos y naciones originarias fueron saqueados permanentemente y reducidos a simples colonias por los países más poderosos del mundo, quienes en su afán de acumulación de riqueza invadieron nuestros territorios, se adueñaron de nuestras riquezas, culturas, conciencias, enajenando nuestro trabajo y ofendiendo a nuestra madre tierra (pachamama) depredando los recursos que existe en ella en pos de lucro desmedido.
En los 80 una inmensa deuda externa imposible de pagar nos postró aun más en la pobreza y la miseria, volviendo a generarse la violencia institucional que ya se había vivido con la militarización de nuestros pueblos, la desaparición y la tortura de nuestros familiares y el sometimiento de nuestras naciones indígenas originarias campesinas.
A lo anterior, ya en la etapa neoliberal, se añaden en el marco del capitalismo transnacional y globalizado los inhumanos procesos de desnacionalización y la sumisión absoluta de los gobiernos neoliberales a los dictados del Fondo Monetario Internacional y del Banco Mundial.
Todo esto ha hecho que la voluntad popular no signifique nada en el esquema del pensamiento de las transnacionales, de la explotación y el crimen, recordándonos permanentemente que la era de colonización de nuestros pueblos aún no ha terminado.
La intromisión del imperialismo yanqui en la historia de nuestros pueblos como ocurrió con países como Colombia, Haití, México, Puerto Rico, Nicaragua, Argentina, Ecuador, Venezuela, Bolivia, entre otros, con el pretexto de luchar contra el “terrorismo” o el “narcotráfico” ha expoliado nuestros recursos y ha empobrecido a nuestra gente; igual que los colonizadores de la “cruz y la espada” se ha apoderado de nuestras riquezas y ha dañado el medio ambiente.
La desigualdad económica, política y social, al igual que la exclusión y la discriminación son producto del neoliberalismo y el colonialismo de larga data, que debilitaron a los Estados y supeditaron el bienestar de nuestros pueblos a los designios de las organizaciones multinacionales y a los intereses de las empresas trasnacionales. La capacidad destructiva del sistema de dominación imperialista es aterradora, el desempleo aumenta y la esperanza de vida desciende; ellos mismos se encuentran ahora sumidos en una crisis sistémica cuya resolución no puede ser a costa del bienestar de nuestros pueblos.
Los movimientos sociales, expresión de las organizaciones indígenas originarias, afro descendientes, campesinas, organizaciones sindicales, juveniles, gremiales, los maestros, los obreros, los sin tierra, los productores cocaleros, las juntas de vecinos, profesionales progresistas y otros que luchan no solo por reivindicaciones salariales, sino también por la vida y el respeto a la madre tierra, desde antes, y desde siempre fueron los verdaderos artífices de la revolución y de las transformaciones profundas.
No olvidemos que los movimientos sociales hemos jugado un papel central en los últimos años en la perspectiva de una democratización y descolonización profunda de nuestros países, por un cambio sustantivo y genuinamente transformador tanto en lo económico, como en lo superestructural de nuestra Abya Yala.
Recordemos que el 14 de diciembre de 2004, Cuba y Venezuela proponen dar inicio e impulsar el ALBA, como alternativa al ALCA, que permita a nuestros pueblos y naciones avanzar políticamente en la búsqueda de una verdadera y libre integración, basada en la solidaridad, que responda a las necesidades sociales, políticas, educativas, culturales, económicas, reconociendo las luchas históricas de los pueblos latinoamericanos y caribeños por su unidad y soberanía.
En noviembre de 2005, en el marco de la Cumbre de las Américas en Mar del Plata, se da la simbólica derrota del ALCA que fue organizada por la Alianza Social Continental, como aporte a la integración.
Meses después en enero de 2006, en el marco del capítulo del Foro Social Mundial, el Presidente Chávez se reúne con Movimientos Sociales y plantea la necesidad de la creación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del Alba.
El año 2006, en Lima Perú se lleva a cabo la Cumbre Enlazando Alternativas, paralela a la Cumbre de Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de América Latina y la Unión Europea, en la que se avanza en la articulación de los Movimientos Sociales en el marco del proceso de integración latinoamericana.
Más tarde en noviembre del 2006, en la ciudad de Cochabamba, Bolivia, se celebra la Cumbre Social por la integración de los Pueblos, paralela a la Cumbre Presidencial de la Comunidad Suramericana de Naciones (CSN). Fue organizada por la Alianza Social Continental, como aporte a la integración en el marco de una gran movilización de los movimientos sociales, originarios y originarios del país.
En la V Cumbre del ALBA celebrada en abril de 2007 se lanza la declaración de Tintorero donde se aprueba la creación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA.
Después en noviembre de 2007, en la II Reunión de la Comisión Política del ALBA, el Consejo de Ministros decide que cada país miembro debe crear su capítulo nacional en el marco de la conformación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA, y que los integrantes de dicho capítulo acordaran la forma y metodología para el funcionamiento de dicho Consejo, así como la invitación a otros movimientos sociales de países extra-ALBA a participar en el mismo.
En ese mismo año, se expande la Alternativa Bolivariana a partir de la formación de las casas del ALBA a países no integrados al ALBA con la participación de las organizaciones sociales de esos países, entre ellos en Perú.
Posteriormente en enero del año 2008, en Caracas se celebra la VI Cumbre del ALBA, donde se aprueba la estrategia para el Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA, incluyendo sus principios, estructura y funciones, además se acuerda darle continuidad a dos acciones pendientes aprobadas en Tintorero, que son:
– Identificar en el ámbito Latinoamericano y caribeño, organizaciones, redes y campañas sub-regionales y regionales, nacionales y locales, en países extra-ALBA que puedan ser convocadas para formar parte del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales”.
– Realizar reunión constitutiva del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales”.
El complejo proceso de organización de la institucionalidad del ALBA-TCP como mecanismo de integración, las realidades y desafíos que han vivido algunos de los procesos políticos de los países miembros (Bolivia, Venezuela), otras prioridades y esfuerzos dentro del ALBA-TCP y criterios de países miembros han determinado que esta iniciativa esté pospuesta desde esa fecha (Aún en febrero de este año, 2009, la Comisión Política acordó “establecer un plazo a la creación de los capítulos nacionales de movimientos sociales y comunicar a la coordinación permanente del ALBA los detalles al respecto antes de finales de abril de 2009. Ello con el fin de promover la instalación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA el primero de mayo de 2009”).
Y es en este contexto que en julio de 2008 el MST y las organizaciones de la Vía Campesina Brasil, en diálogo con otras organizaciones del continente, convocan a sendos encuentros en la Escuela Nacional Florestán Fernández (MST) con un grupo sustantivo de líderes y operadores políticos de movimientos y organizaciones sociales, para, con todos estos antecedentes, llamar a un proceso de construcción de una articulación hemisférica de movimientos y organizaciones sociales en torno a los principios del ALBA y sus iniciativas. Resultado de esta reunión es la Carta de los Movimientos Sociales de las Américas que fue lanzada en la Asamblea de Movimientos Sociales, en ocasión del III Foro Social de las Américas (Guatemala, octubre 2008).
En enero de 2009, como parte de las actividades del VIII FSM 2009, celebrado en Belem de Pará, Brasil, se reunieron en la Asamblea de Movimientos Sociales, representantes de centenares de organizaciones y movimientos de todos los países de las Américas, que se identifican con el proceso de construcción del ALBA, para aprobar esta carta en su versión definitiva: Carta de los Movimientos Sociales de las Américas. Construyendo la integración de los pueblos desde abajo. Impulsando el ALBA y la solidaridad de los pueblos, frente al proyecto del imperialismo.
Recientemente en septiembre de este año, en Sao Paulo se realiza una Convocatoria a los Movimientos Sociales de Las Américas con el objetivo de articular el proceso de construcción del ALBA a partir de los Movimientos Sociales.
Con este recuento no solo reflejamos el camino recorrido en este proceso de integración hasta la fecha, sino que los alentamos a reflexionar y construir desde nuestra historia común.
En efecto lo que estamos viviendo en América Latina es parte de un proceso abarcador de reapropiación social de nuestro destino, de nuevas formas de organización política, horizontal, de democracia directa y participativa, de una economía plural que recupere los recursos naturales en beneficio de los pueblos, de una construcción de nuevas relaciones sociales armónicas, solidarias y comunitarias de producción.
Ahora con una fuerza inusitada surge en América y el mundo el grito de libertad, de lucha por la recuperación de nuestro territorio, de nuestras libertades, de nuestra soberanía; miles de hermanos se sumaron a la causa revolucionaria para liberar la patria, miles de ellos ofrendaron sus vidas en este intento, en diferentes épocas y de diferentes maneras, mártires de la revolución fueron los Tupac Katari, Tupac Amaru, Bartolina Sisa, Manuela Saenz, Apiaguayki Tumpa, Juana Azurduy de Padilla, Santos Pariamo, Marcelo Quiroga Santa Cruz, Inti Peredo, Lempira el héroe de la revolución hondureña, el libertador Simón Bolívar, Augusto Cesar Sandino, José Martí, Ernesto Che Guevara, Salvador Allende. Luis Espinal y actualmente los cinco patriotas cubanos que purgan condenas perpetúas por el solo hecho de luchar contra el terrorismo, contra el imperialismo.
Esta Primera Cumbre del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales en el marco del ALBA-TCP, es una Cumbre histórica que permite la participación directa de los movimientos sociales en los diferentes medios de cooperación y solidaridad, a diferencia de otros mecanismos de integración de países, que nunca han considerado la participación plena de los pueblos y naciones, limitándose a meros intercambios de intereses mercantilistas que van en contra de la integración y reciprocidad de pueblos y naciones de la gran Abya Yala (latinoamericana).
En este contexto la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América y el Caribe, se constituye en un verdadero espacio de construcción de una nueva patria latinoamericana, portando la bandera de la humanidad por su definitiva emancipación. Por eso estamos dispuestos a combatir contra la explotación del hombre por el hombre, considerando que existe la latente necesidad de una “segunda independencia”.
Ésta Cumbre Internacional, es el saludo de los Movimientos Sociales de los países miembros del ALBA-TCP, a la VII Cumbre de Presidentes de la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América – Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos, que durante media década lucha por la desaparición de toda forma de dominación y explotación contra los pueblos y la construcción de relaciones de complementariedad y ayuda recíproca en procura de su desarrollo y de lograr el buen vivir.
Aquí, desde el corazón de Sudamérica, desde los pueblos combatientes, las organizaciones indígenas originarios campesinas, obreros, trabajadores, estudiantes, clase media y profesionales comprometidos con su pueblo de Venezuela, Cuba, Bolivia, Antigua y Barbuda, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Honduras, la Mancomunidad de Domínica, San Vicente y las Granadinas, aunados en el Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP, nos comprometemos a defender los principios revolucionarios del ALBA-TCP, que potencian la lucha y la resistencia contra todo tipo de explotación para construir un mundo diferente.
Nuestro objetivo como Consejo de Movimientos Sociales de los países miembros del ALBA-TCP, es la lucha por el pluralismo en nuestros países y en el mundo entero, sustentada en la armonía entre nuestros pueblos y la madre tierra para el buen vivir, en los principios morales, éticos, políticos y económicos de nuestras comunidades y barrios del campo y la ciudad. Pretendemos forjar desde el seno del pueblo una nueva Patria Social Comunitaria, descolonizada y fundada en la multidiversidad, respetuosa de las diferencias y de las particularidades sociales y regionales.
La actuación del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales, estará fundamentada en los siguientes principios:
– Es un espacio inclusivo, abierto, diverso y plural, a partir de la identificación con los objetivos y principios del ALBA-TCP.
– Es un espacio para compartir y desarrollar agendas comunes que beneficien a los pueblos, sin convertirnos en un espacio para dirimir disputas y representaciones políticas.
– Es un espacio para fortalecer posiciones políticas económicas y sociales, sin convertirnos en un foro o asamblea de actuación social, que reconoce los espacios de articulación existentes.
– Significa el compromiso de la plena identificación con los principios generales que definen el ALBA-TCP como proceso de integración.
– Expresa la legitimidad y representación real de los Movimientos Sociales que se integran.
– En países miembros, sostener permanente diálogo e interrelación con sus respectivos gobiernos.
– Cada Coordinación Nacional en los países miembros del ALBA-TCP, definirá sus propias dinámicas de actuación y de relacionamiento con sus gobiernos.
– En países miembros del ALBA-TCP, los vínculos de las organizaciones sociales con el CMS, se desarrollará a través de las Coordinaciones Nacionales.
– Integrar el enfoque de género, reconociendo el legítimo derecho de la participación de la mujer en los movimientos sociales con equidad, igualdad real y justicia social.
Los pueblos de América Latina que pertenecemos a la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América Latina y el Caribe – Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos, organizados en este Consejo, continuaremos luchando contra los constantes intentos del imperialismo norteamericano de privarnos del desarrollo económico pleno; ni los ataques, amedrentamientos, armas, utilización de la violencia podrán callarnos, seguiremos luchando y siendo solidarios ahora particularmente con el pueblo hermano de Honduras.
Estamos convencidos de que sólo con la organización, movilización y la unidad de los pueblos del ALBA-TCP, es posible un auténtico proceso de integración, como también el logro de la transformación económica, social, política y cultural de nuestros países.
Esta Cumbre reafirma la voluntad de Bolivia, Venezuela, Cuba, Antigua y Barbuda, San Vicente y las Granadinas, Nicaragua, Honduras, Ecuador y la Mancomunidad de Dominica por el desarrollo y el fortalecimiento del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales sobre la base de una solidaridad comprometida con los demás pueblos del continente; optamos por la lucha plural, democrática, antifascista y antiimperialista, a través de un trabajo con objetivos políticos que no escondan su naturaleza ni su carácter revolucionario.
La conformación de este Consejo de Movimientos Sociales nos permite salir de las luchas locales y aisladas, de nuestras fronteras nacionales para integrarnos en la dimensión del AbyaYala o patria latinoamericana, permite la complementariedad y participación de los pueblos en los diferentes Consejos y Grupos de Trabajo que son las instancias de unificación que funcionan en el marco de la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de nuestra América Latina y el Caribe.
Para lo cual se conforma un comité ad hoc, que coordinara Bolivia, y será integrado por un representante de los tres capítulos nacionales ya creados (Bolivia, Venezuela y Cuba) y otras importantes organizaciones, redes y campañas para impulsar el proceso de constitución del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP en seis meses.
Es dado en la ciudad de Cochabamba, a los 16 días del mes octubre de 2009.
______________________________
PROPUESTA DE ACCION
– Consolidación de los capítulos nacionales con organizaciones representativas de los movimientos sociales.
– Incorporar a los movimientos sociales de los países del ALBA en el Exterior. Así como organizaciones sociales presentes en los países Miembros del ALBA.
– Crear espacios de discusión para evaluar actividades de los movimientos sociales y desarrollar programas comunes.
– Que los movimientos sociales realicen actividades de solidaridad de manera conjunta.
– Saludamos las iniciativas de Vía Campesina, MST y otras organizaciones, propuestas en septiembre de 2009 en Sao Paulo, en la perspectiva de fortalecer la articulación de los movimientos sociales del continente. En específico, nos sumamos a la iniciativa de la realización de una Asamblea Continental de Movimientos Sociales con el ALBA, para el primer semestre del 2010.
– Fortalecer los programas de desarrollo, participación y asistencia a través de los movimientos sociales.
– Asignación presupuestaria a los movimientos sociales
– Privilegiar el proceso de participación de la mujer en la dirección de los movimientos sociales.
– Incorporación de manera progresiva a organizaciones comunitarias pequeñas con igualdad de derecho de participación.
– Luchar por los derechos de los inmigrantes a un trabajo digno y a la salud.
– Impulsar la participación de los movimientos sociales de los países cuyos gobiernos no son integrantes formales del ALBA como forma de globalizar la lucha.
– Los programas de los movimientos sociales deben ser entregados a los Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de los Países del ALBA a través de resoluciones para su aprobación.
– Los “10 mandamientos para salvar la vida y el planeta, la humanidad y la vida” propuesto por el Presidente Evo Morales deben ser adoptados como principios fundamentales de los movimientos sociales.
– Cada capítulo nacional debe establecer sus programas que respondan a las necesidades reales de los pueblos.
– Establecer mecanismos de comunicación permanente entre los movimientos sociales y los pueblos y naciones indígenas originarias campesinas, donde se compartan las experiencias del proceso en cada país.
– Desarrollar programas de formación para los voceros de los movimientos sociales.
– Crear una red de medios de comunicación e información propios de los movimientos sociales.
– Luchar y demandar el derecho de los pueblos a la paz y a su autodeterminación.
– Invitar a las Nacionalidades y pueblos indígenas; a las comunidades del campo y de la ciudad; a las organizaciones populares; a los medios y redes de comunicación comunitaria y masiva; a todos y todas los habitantes del mundo, a difundir, denunciar y condenar en sus espacios; las estrategias de intervención de los Estados Unidos, a través de bases militares en Colombia, en la región, y el resto del mundo.
– Impulsar campañas en contra de las empresas transnacionales e impulsar proyectos gran nacionales promovidos por los gobiernos del ALBA A TRAVES DEL TRATADO DE COMERCIO DE LOS PUEBLOS.
– Apoyar la adopción de una moneda internacional, promovidos por los países del ALBA y la UNASUR.
– Estimular las luchas sociales para el re-ascenso del movimiento de masas.
Para lo cual se conforma un comité ad hoc, que coordinara Bolivia, y será integrado por un representante de los tres capítulos nacionales ya creados (Bolivia, Venezuela y Cuba) y otras importantes organizaciones, redes y campañas para impulsar el proceso de constitución del Consejo de Movimientos Sociales del ALBA-TCP en seis meses

(Cochabamba, search Bolivia– 17 de Octubre de 2009)

Nosotros, cure los Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de los países miembros de la Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América – Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos (ALBA – TCP), mind en ocasión de la VII Cumbre en la ciudad de Cochabamba, Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia, el 17 de octubre de 2009.
Teniendo presente las aspiraciones de independencia de los pueblos americanos, desde la resistencia indígena a los conquistadores emprendida por Tupaj Amaru, Tupaj Katari, Guacaipuro, Diriangén y Miskut, pasando por nuestros próceres Eugenio Espejo, Francisco de Miranda, Simón Bolívar, Antonio José de Sucre, Francisco Morazán, José Martí, Eloy Alfaro Delgado y Augusto C. Sandino, hasta nuestros días, en que los pueblos de América Latina y el Caribe se levantan recogiendo las banderas de libertad y justicia de los que nos antecedieron.
Reafirmando nuestro compromiso de continuar con el legado histórico de nuestros libertadores, de avanzar en la unión de los pueblos de nuestra América para la construcción de la Patria Grande como único camino para garantizar la verdadera independencia.
Recordando que las políticas de carácter neoliberal aplicadas en América Latina y el Caribe han generado la exclusión de las mayorías populares en la satisfacción de sus necesidades y han profundizado la desigualdad y la pobreza en la región, beneficiando exclusivamente a los agentes económicos transnacionales y a los grandes monopolios.
Reivindicando los procesos revolucionarios y de liberación expresados en la decisión firme de los pueblos de nuestra América, de romper con los esquemas hegemónicos y de superar el modelo neoliberal y sus efectos en la región que implica terminar con la lógica de la acumulación, el lucro, la ganancia, la competencia y la especulación financiera, así como avanzar en la construcción de un proyecto alternativo basado en los principios de solidaridad, cooperación, complementariedad y respeto a la soberanía y a la autodeterminación de los pueblos.
Condenando el propósito imperialista y neocolonialista que pretende prolongar el modelo de dominación política, económica y militar sobre nuestro continente y mantener, así, una relación histórica de explotación y dependencia, utilizando los instrumentos del libre comercio para la expansión y profundización de la hegemonía capitalista que conduce a la exaltación de la riqueza privada como motor de la dinámica social, y la pérdida de la noción de lo público, lo social y lo humano.
Constatando que es cada vez más necesario implementar políticas que incentiven el intercambio comercial como instrumento de unión de los pueblos asociado al desarrollo productivo entre nuestros países, identificando nuevos esquemas y mecanismos de intercambio económico, así como nuevos actores para el beneficio de las mayorías excluidas.
Reafirmando que es esencial impulsar el desarrollo integral socioproductivo respetando los Derechos de la Madre Tierra y contribuir decididamente a darle solución a la desigualdad y pobreza de nuestros pueblos.
Convencidos de que el modelo neoliberal expresado en los TLCs se encuentran al servicio de las transnacionales y los países ricos, obligando a los países a modificar su marco jurídico violando la soberanía de nuestros pueblos y promoviendo la privatización de los sectores estratégicos de la economía y los servicios básicos (agua, educación, salud, transporte, comunicaciones y energía), ocasionando la reducción del tamaño del Estado y limitando la regulación del mismo, a nivel de la participación accionaria, la reinversión de utilidades, la transferencia de ganancias, buscando abrir las compras públicas de los países en desarrollo a favor de las transnacionales, impulsando su dominio y la penetración en nuestras economías.
Reafirmando que los TLCs profundizan las desigualdades comerciales exaltando la competencia entre las empresas y países desigualmente desarrollados, buscando que los países pobres sigan siendo mono productores y mono exportadores, liberalizando sus mercados mediante la desgravación arancelaria total con el falso argumento de lograr el libre acceso recíproco a los mercados, ocultando los subsidios internos del norte y la gran desproporción entre la oferta exportable de los países desarrollados y los países en desarrollo.
Ratificando que los TLCs permiten que las transnacionales se apropien de los recursos naturales de nuestros pueblos, reduciendo a la humanidad a simples consumidores ampliando los mercados de las transnacionales considerando además a los alimentos como una simple mercancía.
Así mismo los TLCs promueven el patentamiento de la biodiversidad y el genoma humano, buscando ampliar la duración de las patentes de invenciones fundamentales para la salud humana.
Constatando que la crisis ha instalado de manera estructural distorsiones colosales en los mecanismos básicos de funcionamiento de los mercados y la formación de precios en los mercados internacionales a través de la inyección de miles de millones de dólares en juegos especulativos en los mercados cambiarios y en los mercados intermedios y futuros de bienes, por lo que se vuelve indispensable buscar mecanismos institucionales que recuperen la coherencia productiva y garanticen las condiciones básicas de seguridad y soberanía en los planos de alimentación, energía y cuidado de la salud, principalmente.
Definimos que los Principios Fundamentales que regirán el Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos (TCP) de nuestra Alianza, serán los siguientes:
1. Comercio con complementariedad, solidaridad y cooperación, para que juntos alcancemos una vida digna y el vivir bien, promoviendo reglas comerciales y de cooperación para el bienestar de la gente y en particular de los sectores mas desfavorecidos.
2.- Comercio soberano, sin condicionamientos ni intromisión en asuntos internos, respetando las constituciones políticas y las leyes de los Estados, sin obligarlos a aceptar condiciones, normas o compromisos.
3. Comercio complementario y solidario entre los pueblos, las naciones y sus empresas. El desarrollo de la complementación socioproductiva sobre bases de cooperación, aprovechamiento de capacidades y potencialidades existentes en los países, el ahorro de recursos y la creación de empleos. La búsqueda de la complementariedad, la cooperación y la solidaridad entre los diferentes países. El intercambio, la cooperación y la colaboración científico-técnica constantes como una forma de desarrollo, teniendo en consideración las fortalezas de los miembros en áreas específicas, con miras a constituir una masa crítica en el campo de la innovación, la ciencia y la tecnología.
4. Protección de la producción de interés nacional, para el desarrollo integral de todos los pueblos y naciones. Todos los países pueden industrializarse y diversificar su producción para un crecimiento integral de todos los sectores de su economía. El rechazo a la premisa de “exportar o morir” y el cuestionamiento del modelo de desarrollo basado en enclaves exportadores. El privilegio de la producción y el mercado nacional que impulsa la satisfacción de las necesidades de la población a través de los factores de producción internos, importando lo que es necesario y exportando los excedentes de forma complementaria.
5. El trato solidario para las economías más débiles. Cooperación y apoyo incondicional, con el fin de que alcancen un nivel de desarrollo sostenible, que permita alcanzar la suprema felicidad social.
Mientras los TLCs imponen reglas iguales y reciprocas para grandes y chicos, el TCP plantea un comercio que reconozca las diferencias entre los distintos países a través de reglas que favorezcan a las economías más pequeñas.
6. El reconocimiento del papel de los Estados soberanos en el desarrollo socio-económico, la regulación de la economía. A diferencia de los TLCs que persiguen la privatización de los diferentes sectores de la economía y el achicamiento del Estado, el TCP busca fortalecer al Estado como actor central de la economía de un país a todos los niveles enfrentando las prácticas privadas contrarias al interés público, tales como el monopolio, el oligopolio, la cartelización, acaparamiento, especulación y usura. El TCP apoya la nacionalización y la recuperación de las empresas y recursos naturales a los que tienen derecho los pueblos estableciendo mecanismos de defensa legal de los mismos.
7. Promoción de la armonía entre el hombre y la naturaleza, respetando los Derechos de la Madre Tierra y promoviendo un crecimiento económico en armonía con la naturaleza. Se reconoce los Derechos de la Madre Tierra y se impulsa la sostenibilidad en armonía con la naturaleza
8. La contribución del comercio y las inversiones al fortalecimiento de la identidad cultural e histórica de nuestros pueblos. Mientras los TLCs buscan convertir a toda la humanidad en simple consumidores homogenizando los patrones de consumo para ampliar así los mercados de las transnacionales, el TCP impulsa la diversidad de expresiones culturales en el comercio.
9. El favorecimiento a las comunidades, comunas, cooperativas, empresas de producción social, pequeñas y medianas empresas. La promoción conjunta hacia otros mercados de exportaciones de nuestros países y de producciones que resulten de acciones de complementación productiva.
10. El desarrollo de la soberanía y seguridad alimentaría de los países miembros en función de asegurar una alimentación con cantidad y calidad social e integral para nuestros pueblos. Apoyo a las políticas y la producción nacional de alimentos para garantizar el acceso de la población a una alimentación de cantidad y calidad adecuadas.
11. Comercio con políticas arancelarias ajustadas a los requerimientos de los países en desarrollo. La eliminación entre nuestros países de todas las barreras que constituyan un obstáculo a la complementación, permitiendo a los países subir sus aranceles para proteger a sus industrias nacientes o cuando consideren necesario para su desarrollo interno y el bienestar de su población con el fin de promover una mayor integración entre nuestros pueblos. Desgravaciones arancelarias asimétricas y no reciprocas que permiten a los países menos desarrollados subir sus aranceles para proteger a sus industrias nacientes o cuando consideren necesario para su desarrollo interno y el bienestar de su población.
12. Comercio protegiendo a los servicios básicos como derechos humanos. El reconocimiento del derecho soberano de los países al control de sus servicios según sus prioridades de desarrollo nacional y proveer de servicios básicos y estratégicos directamente a través del Estado o en inversiones mixtas con los países socios.
En oposición al TLC que promueve la privatización de los servicios básicos del agua, la educación, la salud, el transporte, las comunicaciones y la energía, el TCP promueve y fortalece el rol del Estado en estos servicios esenciales que hacen al pleno cumplimiento de los derechos humanos.
13. Cooperación para el desarrollo de los diferentes sectores de servicios. Prioridad a la cooperación dirigida al desarrollo de capacidades estructurales de los países, buscando soluciones sociales en sectores como la salud y la educación, entre otros. Reconocimiento del derecho soberano de los países al control y la regulación de todos los sectores de servicios buscando promover a sus empresas de servicios nacionales. Promoción de la cooperación entre países para el desarrollo de los diferentes sectores de servicios antes que el impulso a la libre competencia desleal entre empresas de servicios de diferente escala.
14. Respeto y cooperación a través de las Compras Públicas. Las compras públicas son una herramienta de planificación para el desarrollo y de promoción de la producción nacional que debe ser fortalecida a través de la cooperación participación y la ejecución conjunta de compras cuando resulte conveniente.
15. Ejecución de inversiones conjuntas en materia comercial que puedan adoptar la forma de empresas grannacionales. La asociación de empresas estatales de diferentes países para impulsar un desarrollo soberano y de beneficio mutuo.
16. Socios y no patrones La exigencia a que la inversión extranjera respete las leyes nacionales. A diferencia de los TLCs que imponen una serie de ventajas y garantías a favor de las transnacionales, el TCP busca una inversión extranjera que respete las leyes, reinvierta las utilidades y resuelva cualquier controversia con el Estado al igual que cualquier inversionista nacional.
Los inversionistas extranjeros no podrán demandar a los Estados Nacionales ni a los Gobiernos por desarrollar políticas de interés público
17. Comercio que respeta la vida. Mientras los TLCs promueve el patentamiento de la biodiversidad y del genoma humano, el TCP los protege como patrimonio común de la humanidad y la madre tierra.
18. La anteposición del derecho al desarrollo y a la salud a la propiedad intelectual e industrial. A diferencia de los TLCs que buscan patentar y ampliar la duración de la patente de invenciones que son fundamentales para la salud humana, la preservación de la madre tierra y el crecimiento de los países en desarrollo, -muchas de las cuáles han sido realizadas con fondos o subvenciones publicas- el TCP ante pone el derecho al desarrollo y a la salud antes que la propiedad intelectual de las transnacionales.
19. Adopción de mecanismos que conlleven a la independencia monetaria y financiera. Impulso a mecanismos que ayuden a fortalecer la soberanía monetaria, financiera, y la complementariedad en esta materia entre los países.
20. Protección de los derechos de los trabajadores y los derechos de los pueblos indígenas. Promoción de la vigencia plena de los mismos y la sanción a la empresa y no al país que los incumple.
21. Publicación de las negociaciones comerciales a fin de que el pueblo pueda ejercer su papel protagónico y participativo en el comercio. Nada de negociaciones secretas y a espaldas de la población.
22.       La calidad como la acumulación social de conocimiento, y su aplicación en la producción en función de la satisfacción de las necesidades sociales de los pueblos, según un nuevo concepto de calidad en el marco del ALBA-TCP para que los estándares no se conviertan en obstáculos a la producción y al intercambio comercial entre los pueblos.
23. La libre movilidad de las personas como un derecho humano. El TCP reafirma el derecho a la libre movilidad humana, con el objeto de fortalecer los lazos de hermandad entre todos los países del mundo.
VII CUMBRE DE JEFES DE ESTADO Y DE GOBIERNO DE LA
ALIANZA BOLIVARIANA PARA LOS PUEBLOS DE NUESTRA AMERICA (ALBA –TCP)
(Cochabamba, 17 de octubre de 2009)
COCHABAMBA, health BOLIVIA – 17 DE OCTUBRE DE 2009

Los Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de los países miembros de la “Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América – Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos” (ALBA – TCP), en el marco de su VII Cumbre en la ciudad de Cochabamba, Estado Plurinacional de Bolivia, el 17 de octubre de 2009 y al conmemorarse cinco años de su fundación resaltan su constitución como una Alianza política, económica y social en defensa de la soberanía, la autodeterminación, la identidad de los pueblos y como un referente de que “Un mundo mejor es posible”.
El ALBA-TCP defiende los principios del Derecho Internacional, particularmente, el respeto a la soberanía, la autodeterminación de los pueblos, el derecho al desarrollo, la integridad territorial y la promoción de la justicia social y la paz internacional, así como el rechazo a la agresión, la amenaza y uso de la fuerza, la injerencia extranjera y las medidas de coerción unilateral contra los países en desarrollo.
El ALBA-TCP promueve los principios de solidaridad, cooperación, complementariedad, respeto mutuo a la soberanía de nuestros países, justicia, equidad, respeto a la diversidad cultural y armonía con la naturaleza, y desempeña un papel fundamental para los procesos revolucionarios y progresistas a nivel mundial convirtiéndose en una alianza promotora de la solidaridad entre los países del Sur.
A 200 años de los primeros Gritos Libertarios en América, los Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno del ALBA-TCP reafirman su firme compromiso de continuar en el avance hacia la independencia, la liberación, la autodeterminación y la unión que reclaman los pueblos de Nuestra América y del Caribe, y declaran:
I
1. Por su esencia, el capitalismo y su máxima expresión el imperialismo, están destruyendo la propia existencia de la humanidad y nuestra Madre Tierra. La crisis económica global, la crisis del cambio climático, la crisis alimentaria, y la crisis energética son de carácter estructural y se deben, fundamentalmente, a patrones de producción, distribución y consumo insostenibles, a la concentración y acumulación del capital en pocas manos, al saqueo permanente e indiscriminado de los recursos naturales, a la mercantilización de la vida y a la especulación a todos los niveles para beneficio de unos pocos.
2. La crisis económica mundial que se originó en los países desarrollados y de la que no somos responsables, tiene un impacto mayor en los países en desarrollo con el incremento de la pobreza y el desempleo.Lejos de registrarse un financiamiento del norte hacia el sur, se observa una tendencia creciente a una transferencia neta de capitales del sur hacia el norte. Las políticas económicas mundiales dominantes no tienen como propósito promover el bienestar de los seres humanos sino salvar a algunos bancos y empresas.
3. La “Conferencia Internacional de las Naciones Unidas al más alto nivel sobre la Crisis Financiera y Económica y sus impacto en el Desarrollo” en junio de este año, pese a sus limitaciones, demostró la necesidad impostergable de avanzar hacia la construcción de un nuevo orden económico internacional justo y equitativo que reconozca y respalde los objetivos de desarrollo de los países del Sur, tales como la creación de nuevos mecanismos de desarrollo, la construcción de una nueva arquitectura financiera internacional, la consolidación de una moneda internacional alternativa y el desarrollo de un comercio complementario, justo y solidario.
4. La crisis financiera no se solucionará en el marco del G8, el G20 u otros grupos excluyentes. La solución sólo podrá emanar del G–192, representado por la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas, donde todos los países tienen voz y voto en igualdad de condiciones. En este ámbito es necesario impulsar el Grupo Especial de Trabajo de composición abierta establecido para el seguimiento a la crisis en la Asamblea General.
5. La crisis económica global no se puede resolver con medidas solo de tipo financiero, regulatorio, monetario o comercial. Una crisis estructural requiere de soluciones estructurales. El apoyo que están brindando los países desarrollados a los grandes bancos aumenta la centralización del capital del sector financiero en manos de pequeños grupos, dificultando el control y regulación del sector. Asimismo no existen mecanismos apropiados de supervisión de la gestión de las grandes corporaciones y de las políticas de libre competencia. Por tal motivo, se requiere una profundatransformación de la economía real y no sólo en el ámbito financiero.
6. A la crisis económica global se suma la crisis del cambio climático que es parte de una crisis ecológica más amplia que afecta a nuestra Madre Tierra. Cada año se consume un tercio más de lo que el planeta es capaz de regenerar. A este ritmo de derroche del sistema capitalista, se necesitarándos planetas Tierra para el año 2030.
7. Los seres humanos son parte de un sistema interdependiente de plantas, animales, cerros, bosques, océanos y aire con el cual deben convivir en armonía y equilibrio respetando los derechos de todos. Para garantizar los derechos humanos se debe reconocer y defender los derechos de la Madre Tierra. Por ello es fundamental aprobar en el marco de Naciones Unidas una Declaración Universal de Derechos de la Madre Tierra.
8. El calentamiento global y el cambio climático están provocando el retroceso y pérdida de los glaciares, la afectación a los recursos hídricosque ocasiona la disminución de las fuentes de agua potable, la sequía en diferentes regiones, una mayor frecuencia en los huracanes y en los desastres naturales, la pérdida de biodiversidad y de vidas humanas.
9. Los países desarrollados tienen una deuda climática, en el marco de una deuda ecológica más amplia, con los países en desarrollo, por   su responsabilidad histórica de emisiones y por las acciones de adaptación que estamos condenados a realizar a causa del calentamiento global que ellos han ocasionado. Esta deuda climática debe ser reconocida y honrada a través de las disposiciones del régimen vigente de cambio climático: a) reducciones sustanciales en sus emisiones domésticas de gases de efecto invernadero que se determinen en base a la porción de las emisiones globales requeridas por los países en desarrollo para lograr sus necesidades de desarrollo económicos y sociales, erradicar la pobreza y lograr el derecho a desarrollo; b) cumplimiento de sus compromisos para una efectiva transferencia de tecnología y c) garantías en la provisión de recursos financieros adicionales y necesarios de forma adecuada, previsible y sostenible, enfatizando que los requerimientos para la adaptación de los países en desarrollo se han incrementado como consecuencia de la crisis ambiental y destacando que nuestros países requieren de este pago de la deuda climática para posibilitar sus acciones de mitigación.
10. En la Conferencia de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Cambio Climático que se celebrará en Copenhague a fines de año, los países desarrollados, en el marco del protocolo de Kyoto, deben adoptarcompromisos significativos de reducción de emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero, y aprobar mecanismos de compensación para los países que preservan, protegen y conservan sus bosques.
11. La iniciativa “Yasuní ITT”, llevada adelante por el Ecuador es una efectiva medida voluntaria para enfrentar el problema del cambio climático, garantizando la conservación de uno de los lugares más biodiversos del mundo, iniciativa por la cual el Ecuador dejará de explotar 846 millones de barriles de petróleo que yacen en el subsuelo del Parque Nacional Yasuní, lo que evitará la emisión a la atmósfera de 407 millones de toneladas métricas de carbono, que se producirían por la quema de esos combustibles fósiles. Esta iniciativa contribuirá al respeto por las culturas indígenas de los pueblos en aislamiento voluntario que habitan en el Parque Yasuní, así como al desarrollo social, la conservación de la naturaleza y el fomento del uso de fuentes de energía renovables.
12. La crisis energética es producto de la irracionalidad en los patrones de consumo impuestos por los países ricos, y de la especulación monopólica y financiera en beneficio de las grandes compañías transnacionales.
13. Para generar un verdadero cambio en el acceso a la energía en el mundo, particularmente en los países en desarrollo, es fundamental realizar esfuerzos de cooperación, complementación e integración regional, en el desarrollo de modelos de eficiencia energética en la generación, la transmisión y el consumo así como en el desarrollo de energías renovables garantizando el acceso a los servicios de toda la población.
14. El acceso a la energía es un derecho de los pueblos que los Estados deben garantizar a través del fortalecimiento de sus políticas públicas, de la defensa del derecho de los pueblos sobre sus recursos naturales nacionales y de la búsqueda de fuentes de energía alternativa, velando por la conservación y desarrollo en armonía con la naturaleza.
15. El impacto negativo de la crisis alimentaria en nuestros pueblos, constituye uno de los problemas más apremiantes del siglo XXI, que requiere de medidas urgentes y coordinadas para garantizar el acceso adecuado y oportuno a alimentos, y la soberanía y seguridad alimentaria de los países en desarrollo.
16. El uso irracional de alimentos para producir biocombustibles es una práctica que contribuye a la crisis alimentaria, incrementa la pobreza, reduce las áreas forestales y la cantidad de tierra para satisfacer las necesidades de alimentos, encarece el precio de éstos e incrementa el uso indiscriminado del agua.
17. La migración no es un delito. La discriminación y penalización de las personas migrantes en cualquiera de sus formas debe ser abolida. Es urgente una reforma de las políticas migratorias del gobierno de los Estados Unidos y la revocatoria de la Directiva de Retorno de la Unión Europea, con el objetivo de detener las deportaciones y redadas masivas, permitir la reunificación de las familias, y eliminar el muro en la frontera de Estados Unidos con México que, a la vez, separa y divide nuestros pueblos, en vez de unirnos. Deben ser abrogadas las leyes y políticas de carácter discriminatorio y selectivo, causantes de pérdidas de vidas humanas, entre ellas, la llamada “Ley de Ajuste Cubano” y la política de “pies secos” – pies mojados que aplica el Gobierno de los Estados Unidos con inmigrantes irregulares de Cuba.
18. En oposición a las políticas migratorias basadas esencialmente en la seguridad que se han impuesto paradójicamente en países que han sido edificados gracias a las migraciones, es necesario profundizar el diálogo y la toma de acciones entre los países de origen, tránsito y destino de las migraciones, a fin de abordar el hecho migratorio de manera integral y comprensiva, con un enfoque centrado en el ser humano y el respeto a sus derechos.
19. Manifiestan su apoyo para el fortalecimiento y creación de mecanismos comunes que refuercen los avances de los países latinoamericanos y caribeños en el intercambio de experiencias y mejores prácticas para el combate a la trata de personas, el tráfico ilegal de migrantes, la explotación sexual, laboral y otros modos de explotación.
20. Hoy la Cooperación Sur – Sur cobra gran importancia por el impacto de la crisis económica global del capitalismo sobre los pueblos y naciones del Sur. En este marco reviste gran importancia la Conferencia sobre Cooperación Sur – Sur que se realizará en Kenia en diciembre de 2009.
21. Frente al avance y crecimiento de las fuerzas e ideas progresistas en América Latina y el Caribe que se reflejan, entre otras formas, en el fortalecimiento del ALBA-TCP, el imperialismo y las fuerzas derechistas han reaccionado con el Golpe de Estado en Honduras y la instalación de bases militares en Colombia.
22. El presidente constitucional de Honduras, compañero José Manuel Zelaya Rosales, debe ser restablecido inmediata e incondicionalmente. Ningún proceso electoral realizado bajo el gobierno golpista, ni las autoridades que de él emerjan, pueden ser reconocidos por la comunidad internacional. La violación de derechos humanos, las detenciones y las muertes que hoy sufre el pueblo de Honduras tienden a agravarse con el fracaso de las medidas dilatorias de la dictadura y la proximidad de las elecciones fraudulentas que ha convocado para intentar consolidarse. En este contexto es fundamental impulsar una ofensiva diplomática y promover acciones contundentes para el restablecimiento pleno del orden Constitucional.
23. La instalación de bases militares de los Estados Unidos en América Latina y el Caribe, provocan desconfianza entre los pueblos, ponen en peligro la paz, amenazan la democracia y facilitan la injerencia hegemónica en el continente. América Latina y el Caribe constituyen una zona de paz que debe estar libre de la presencia de bases militares y fuerzas militares extranjeras que atentan contra nuestros pueblos. El Gobierno de Colombia debe reconsiderar la instalación de dichas bases militares. El territorio que ilegalmente ocupa la Base Naval de los Estados Unidos en Guantánamo, debe ser devuelto incondicionalmente a Cuba.
24. El bloqueo económico, comercial y financiero de los Estados Unidos de América contra la República de Cuba debe terminar de manera incondicional, unilateral e inmediata.
25. Es inaceptable, que vulnerando las normas internacionales, diferentes gobiernos den refugio o asilo a personas que no califiquen en esas calidades de acuerdo con los instrumentos internacionales vigentes y que estén procesadas por delitos de lesa humanidad y terrorismo, obstaculizando el esclarecimiento de sus deudas con la justicia.
26. La defensa de la identidad y la diversidad cultural es fundamental en la lucha contra el neocolonialismo. En ese sentido es importante avanzar en la revalorización y despenalización del masticado de la hoja de coca, así como en retirar a la hoja de coca de la lista 1 de la Convención sobre Estupefacientes de 1961.
27. La lucha integral y eficaz contra el narcotráfico, debe darse en el marco del más estricto respeto a la soberanía, la no injerencia en asuntos internos, la responsabilidad compartida y el respeto a los derechos humanos a través de acciones de cooperación regional y multilateral que destierren para siempre las prácticas neocoloniales de certificación y descertificación en la materia y supresión de preferencias comerciales como aplica los Estados Unidos de América con fines de hegemonía política.
28. Los medios de comunicación tienen que desarrollar su actividad social con responsabilidad, sentido ético y de servicio público para todos los ciudadanos, y no ser instrumentos de los intereses sectarios de algunas minorías, ni ser utilizados como instrumentos de desinformación y desestabilización política.
29. El proceso de construcción de confianza mutua entre Bolivia y Chile para la resolución de la histórica demanda boliviana de retorno soberano al mar, en el marco de la hermandad, el respeto y la confianza entre dos pueblos hermanos es un esfuerzo que merece el respaldo de toda la comunidad internacional para que arribe a resultados tangibles.
30. La celebración de las próximas elecciones generales en Bolivia, a llevarse a cabo el 6 de diciembre del año en curso, resalta nuevamente la convicción democrática de los países del ALBA-TCP, en respuesta a las actitudes y movimientos golpistas en América Latina y el Caribe.
II
Los Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno de los países miembros de la “Alianza Bolivariana para los Pueblos de Nuestra América – Tratado de Comercio de los Pueblos” (ALBA – TCP), acuerdan las siguientes medidas:
1. Aprueban la modificación de la denominación del Sistema Único de Compensación Regional de Pagos (SUCRE), por Sistema Unitario de Compensación Regional de Pagos (SUCRE), considerando que esta última expresa de mejor manera el sentimiento de unidad y objeto del sistema SUCRE. En este sentido suscriben el Tratado Constitutivo del Sistema Unitario de Compensación Regional de Pagos (SUCRE) como instrumento para lograr la soberanía monetaria y financiera, la eliminación de la dependencia del dólar estadounidense en el comercio regional, la reducción de asimetrías y la consolidación progresiva de una zona económica de desarrollo compartido. Instruyen a los Comités técnicos del SUCRE a sostener una reunión, a más tardar a mediados del mes de noviembre, para tratar el Plan de Implantación del SUCRE.
2. Establecen los Principios Fundamentales que regirán el Tratado d