Una alternativa desde el sur: La nueva arquitectura financiera de la integración regional

Lorenzo Fioramonti

Crises, sale like those gripping Europe, tend to expose the process and practice of regional governance as technocratic and elite-driven. But citizens and civil society may well demand more voice and power, in a ‘politicisation’ of regions.

In a globalizing world, where old and new evolutions challenge traditional decision making and (nation) states find it increasingly difficult to govern political processes and economic transactions that are ever more cross-boundary in nature, supranational regional governance has proven a powerful tool to address such growing complexity.

As a meso-level between the state and a hypothetical global government, regional organizations have been purposefully created with a view to providing more effective management structures to deal with phenomena and processes transcending the borders of national communities. Traditionally, trans-frontier natural resources were the first common goods to be placed under the administration of regional organizations. For instance, the oldest existing regional organization in the world is the Central Commission for the Navigation of the Rhine, an authority established in Europe during the 1815 Congress of Vienna. Its purpose was to manage cross-boundary transports along the river Rhine, which cuts across France, Germany, Switzerland and the Netherlands, and – in spite of its limited political clout – it set an important precedent for the future evolutions of European integration. The forerunner of the European Economic Community, which then transformed into the European Union, was the European Coal and Steal Community, a supranational authority created to provide common jurisdiction over the most fundamental natural resources of the continent, whose direct control had historically been the main source of conflict in the region.

Nowadays, there is a virtually endless list of regional organizations operating in divers sectors, entrusted with varying degrees of power and decision-making authority. Although most of them only perform specific functions (e.g. natural resources management, conflict prevention, legal advice, customs control, policing, etc.), there has been an increase in the establishment of ‘general purpose’ regional organizations, of which the EU is the most well-known and developed example. Some of them have evolved out of specific trade agreements (e.g. free trade areas), such as the Common Market of the South (Mercosur), while others have been created with a view to guaranteeing security and development, such as the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) and the African Union (AU). As famously remarked by P. Katzenstein, the contemporary international arena may very well develop into a ‘world of regions’, where openness and cooperation are reinforced by growth in cross-border exchanges and global transformations in interstate relations.

Regions and crises

According to Karl Deutsch, one of the forefathers of regional studies, the most fundamental example of region-building is constituted by so-called ‘security communities’, groupings of countries that share institutional systems to avoid internal conflicts and address common external threats. In this vein, the existence of certain threats (often in the form of fully-fledged conflicts) has been instrumental to the creation of regional organizations. The European integration project emerged out of the ashes of World War II. The Organization of African Unity (OAU) was created after the end of colonialism while its successor, the AU, was established to guarantee peace and development in a traditionally troubled continent. Similarly, ASEAN was founded to oppose the advancement of communism in South East Asia and strengthen the small countries of the region vis-à-vis their strong and powerful neighbours.

Supranational regionalism and crises have always been intimately connected, both empirically and theoretically. Yet, although most theoretical approaches appear to discuss crises as potential springboards for more and better regional cooperation/integration, the opposite is equally true. For instance, De Gaulle’s critical stance vis-à-vis the process of European integration (which led to a prolonged institutional crisis in the 1960s) prompted Ernst Haas, the founder of the neo-functionalist approach, to conclude that regional integration theory was ‘obsolete’. The current sovereign-debt crisis (often dubbed as the Euro-crisis) is raising a lot of doubts about the capacity of the EU to weather the storm and re-launch integration of the European continent. Public discourse not only in Europe, but also in the rest of the world, hints at the fact that regional cooperation/ integration does not deal well with ‘rainy days’, when member states tend to become more inward looking and seek refuge in short-sighted nationalism.

The word ‘crisis’ derives from the ancient Greek verb krinein, which means to ‘separate, decide and judge’. As such, it therefore describes events or phenomena that produce change and lead to decisions. Looking at most current events, it is not easy to gauge the extent to which these crises may lead to more regional cooperation/integration or, conversely, to gradual/abrupt disintegration. However, there is little doubt that they present fundamental turning points in the evolution of regional cooperation/integration and pose significant challenges to all stakeholders involved. At the same time, they may very well become opportunities to reassess the usefulness of supranational regions and prospectively re-design a world of new regions.

Euro-crisis and the weakening of the European model

Crises are revelatory moments. They break the repetitive continuity of ordinary processes and present us with unexpected threats and opportunities. As disruptive events, they force us to rethink conventional wisdom and become imaginative. In the evolution of political institutions, crises have been fundamental turning points opening up new space for governance innovations or, by contrast, reducing the spectrum of available options. They have ushered in phases of progress and prosperity or plummeted our societies into the darkness of parochialism and backwardness.

The current Euro-crisis may have a significant long-term impact on the ‘acceptability’ of regional integration as an end-goal for regionalism not only in Europe, but also in other regions. If the European project fails to deliver the expected outcomes of stability, well-being and solidarity, then it is likely that other regions will refrain from pushing for full-blown integration, perhaps privileging less demanding forms of cooperation. It also appears as if the EU ‘model’ of integration has been severely eroded by the global financial crisis and the turmoil in the Eurozone. There is indeed growing criticism of Eurocentric approaches to regionalism, not only among scholars, but also among leading policy makers. Especially, emerging powers in Africa, Asia and South America are becoming more assertive about the need to find different ways to promote regional governance in a world in which traditional power distributions are being fundamentally called into question. Moreover, the recent popular revolutions in North Africa and the Middle East are likely to reshape geostrategic equilibria in the Mediterranean and possibly usher in a new phase of regional cooperation within the Arab world and also with Europe.  

Citizens and regional governance

Citizens have been the underdogs of regionalism. From Europe, to Africa, Asia and Latin America, civil society has largely been on the receiving end of region-building processes. More often than not, civil society has been intentionally sidelined, while some sympathetic non-governmental organisations have been given the instrumental task of supporting institutions in their efforts at building a regional ‘identity’. In spite of rhetorical references to the importance of civic participation, regionalism has largely developed ‘without the citizens’.

Yet contemporary crises seem to bring ‘the people’ back into the picture, at least insofar as various attempts at regional cooperation and integration stumble upon the ideas, values and expectations of the citizens. The Euro-crisis is not just a matter of scarce liquidity and overexposure of a few national governments and most private banks. It is first and foremost a legitimacy crisis, which is revealing the fundamental limitations of an elite-driven regionalism model. Not disputing the pivotal role that European political elites played in setting the integration process in motion, there is little doubt that ‘deep integration’ will only be achieved when European citizens will have a say over the type of developmental trajectory that the EU should adopt as well as its ultimate goals. Looking at the astonishing amount of public resources channelled to rescue private banks in comparison to the harsh austerity plans enforced on allegedly profligate Member States, one cannot help but ask the question: what actual interests drive regionalism in the world?

Most observers have been traditionally looking at regionalization processes as politically neutral phenomena in international affairs. Research in this field has been generally restricted to the ‘quantity’ of regionalism, rather than its ‘quality’. Whether it is to explain the gradual devolution of authority from nation states to supranational institutions (as is the case with neo-functionalism) or whether it is to demonstrate the continuous bargaining process involving national governments (as is the case with intergovernmentalism), mainstream approaches to regional cooperation and integration have refrained from looking at the quality of regionalization processes. Will there be more or fewer regions in the world? Will regional institutions replace the nation state? Will regional governance become predominant in the years to come? Granted, these are very important questions and deserve to be examined in depth, especially in academic circles. Yet, the current crises force us to assess the state of regionalism in the world not only in terms of its predominance and diffusion, but also – and more importantly – in terms of how it contributes, if any, towards the well-being of our societies.  

Most ‘models’ and ‘practices’ of regionalism have tended to exclude the diversity of voices and roles in society. They have often served the specific interests of ruling elites (as in Latin America and Africa), the ambitions of hegemonic actors (as in Europe and Asia) or the agendas of industrial and financial powers. Moreover, through their apparently neutral technocratic character, most attempts at regional cooperation and integration have aimed to obscure the fact that there are always winners and losers in regionalism processes. 

This top-down model is being increasingly challenged. Overlapping crises and the redistribution of power at the global level call into question the capacity of regions to deliver on their promises, thus unveiling the unavoidable political character of any model of regionalism. In response to the growing cost of regionalism, citizens want to have more say over future regional trajectories and exercise their democratic powers. As a consequence, regionalism is evolving from a ‘closed’ process, designed and packaged by a small circle of political and economic elites, to an ‘open’ process, in which democratic participation and accountability are playing an ever more important role. Borrowing from the jargon of Internet users, one may say that regions are transitioning from a 1.0 phase dominated by technocrats to a 2.0 stage characterised by horizontal networks, alternative models and citizens’ contestations.

The EU, undoubtedly the most advanced and successful example of regionalism in the world, is now experiencing the direst consequences of such a transition. Amid rising unemployment, social malaise and growing discontent for the lack of accountability of national and regional politics, millions of citizens have been protesting against the Union and its political and economic agenda. Contrary to what eurosceptics would have us believe, these citizens do not call for less Europe: they want a different Europe. They would like regional integration to be more about connecting cultures and individuals and less about supporting capital. They would like their regional institutions to focus on helping the unemployed rather than bailing out bankrupt banks. They would like to see more solidarity across classes and generations, rather than less. They would like cooperation to be about building a different future instead of reshuffling old ideas. The future of regionalism may very well entail a growing ‘politicisation’ of regions, whereby citizens and civil society demand more voice and power in influencing not just general principles and values, but also the long-term political trajectories of their regions.

 

Source: Open Democracy

por Kintto Lucas

ALAI AMLATINA, treat 16/07/2013.- En los últimos años, pharm América del Sur ha dado pasos decisivos en su camino hacia la integración regional. Conscientes de los desafíos que ha generado la globalización y que se han evidenciado en las crisis económicas y políticas internacionales, buy así como en la proliferación de actividades ilícitas transnacionales que traspasan las capacidades individuales de los Estados, algunos países han comenzado a entender que las ventajas de una mayor cooperación e intercambio comercial no son el objetivo final, sino que es necesario coordinar respuestas en políticas económicas y fiscales, pero también sociales, en manejo de recursos naturales, temas ambientales, de defensa y en otros ámbitos, para enfrentar las amenazas. Pero sobre todo, que en el mundo que se va configurando es imposible caminar solos, y es fundamental caminar en colectivo

Para reforzar la integración es necesario incrementar los niveles de interdependencia económica y comercial en la región. Es un camino complejo pero no imposible. Falta todavía profundizar en una mirada colectiva y dejar de mirarse cada uno al ombligo. Es necesario que las economías más grandes sean más solidarias con las economías pequeñas, pero también es fundamental que éstas busquen un desarrollo propio, dejen de ser parasitarias y no se escondan detrás la farsa de revender productos traídos de otros países sin incorporar agregado nacional o solo colocando una etiqueta de industria nacional.

De a poco América del Sur se va alejando de la teoría de integración regional que promueve el divorcio entre Economía y Política, y que terminó por arrastrar a muchos países a la falacia del “mercado auto regulador” como promotor del desarrollo. Sin embargo, es preocupante observar que después de las nefastas experiencias con la aplicación de la terapias de shock de mercado –en palabras de Naomi Klein-, este tipo de medidas políticas se siguen vendiendo desde algunos países de la OCDE, organizaciones financieras multilaterales, sectores políticos de derecha y ciertos empresarios, como la panacea para la proyección económica de nuestros países.

Desde el Norte se promueven los tratados de libre comercio y la liberalización y desregulación financiera, así como la privatización y la flexibilización del mercado de trabajo como los mecanismos fundamentales para la integración a la economía internacional. En América del Sur hay quienes escuchan esos cantos de sirena y defienden la necesidad urgente de crear un área de libre comercio estilo ALCA. Pretenden así reponer los fracasos del modelo neoliberal.

La integración regional de Suramérica debe recuperar el rol del Estado sobre el mercado, y de la sociedad sobre el Estado y el mercado. Los Estados Suramericanos integrados deben controlar el mercado suramericano integrado. Y la sociedad suramericana debe jugar un papel fundamental con su participación para controlar los Estados y los mercados integrados. Esa integración debe generar vías para un modelo de desarrollo que permita la proyección de cada país y la proyección conjunta. La eficacia y el aprovechamiento de las sinergias regionales dependen de la capacidad de entender que es un proyecto colectivo, no individual, y del tejido institucional que se consolide en el proceso de integración.

Fortalecer y profundizar la integración en América del Sur, pasa por fortalecer y profundizar Unasur, y en ese camino es fundamental fortalecer y profundizar el Mercosur caminando hacia un Mercosur Suramericano. Pero eso depende de la capacidad que muestren nuestros Estados para reconfigurar sus estructuras productivas. Esto será posible si los gobiernos van de a poco trascendiendo el ámbito de la mera racionalidad económica y se comprometen en la construcción de una Política Económica Común e Inclusiva, que aproveche las ventajas de la región en recursos alimenticios, hídricos, materias primas industriales y energéticas, generando una integración productiva y la complementariedad entre los países.

En el nuevo orden mundial, la importancia de América del Sur en la economía internacional es innegable. Es uno de los polos económicos más dinámicos. Actualmente, el PIB de los países de la Suramérica representa el 73 por ciento del de América Latina y el Caribe, que a su vez representa el 8 por ciento del comercio mundial. A pesar del peso económico, la matriz productiva y exportadora de nuestros países continúa centrada en el sector primario y en las manufacturas intensivas en materias primas y recursos naturales. Este fenómeno responde a los altos precios de los commodities en el mercado internacional, pero también a la concentración de la inversión, tanto nacional como extranjera, en la explotación de materias primas. Como consecuencia, los países suramericanos enfrentan la amenaza de la desindustrialización y reprimariziación de sus economías. Estos procesos conllevan el aparecimiento de enclaves productivos cuya generación de riqueza no se transmite al total de la economía, dadas las escasas concatenaciones productivas que generan y la fuga de capitales en forma de repatriación de ganancias y beneficios y de incremento desmedido de las importaciones. Esos enclaves, muchas veces son parte de la parasitaria inversión extranjera que no paga impuestos y aporta muy poco a nuestros países.

La forma independiente que los países suramericanos han concebido su desarrollo económico, ha dado origen al establecimiento de estructuras productivas orientadas a satisfacer solamente necesidades extra regionales, llevando a que la dinámica económica de los países de la región contribuya en poco o nada a la dinámica económica colectiva de la región. Debido a este modo individualista de concebir el crecimiento económico y de aplicar políticas comerciales fundamentadas en aperturismos indiscriminados, la mayor parte de las economías suramericanas han experimentado procesos de desmantelamiento productivo o pérdida de dinamismo económico en los sectores industriales. Paralelamente grandes segmentos de nuestras poblaciones ven disminuir el desempleo pero crecer el empleo precario. Y observan que, si bien se nota una clara disminución de la pobreza, la desigualdad se mantiene y a veces es más evidente.

Es necesario que la integración económica suramericana gire en torno a la articulación de las economías nacionales, que las estructuras productivas busquen satisfacer las necesidades de los habitantes de la región, de modo que podamos desarrollar nuestros sectores manufactureros y de servicios. En ese sentido se debe asegurar las condiciones jurídicas y técnicas para promover inversiones productivas regionales. Y finalmente hay que configurar ordenamientos productivos que contribuyan a que todas y cada una de las economías de la región alcancen niveles altos de competitividad para poder, en otra fase, competir en los mercados de servicios y manufacturas de mediano y alto valor agregado internacionales.

En el difícil camino hacia un Mercosur Suramericano, Mercosur debe transformarse en la cabeza de puente para formar un bloque comercial suramericano, que se rija por los principios de solidaridad, complementariedad y consideración de las asimetrías en los niveles de desarrollo económico y social de los diferentes miembros, que priorice el papel del Estado, que tenga como finalidad el bienestar de la población en lugar de las ganancias del gran capital, y que sirva como ejemplo de un modelo de regionalismo diferente, frente a los esquemas tradicionales que se basan en el fundamentalismo de mercado.

– Kintto Lucas es Embajador Itinerante de Uruguay para Unasur, Celac y Alba. Ex Vicecanciller de Ecuador.

Fuente: http://alainet.org/active/65704&lang=es

por Kintto Lucas

ALAI AMLATINA, healing 16/07/2013.- En los últimos años, page
América del Sur ha dado pasos decisivos en su camino hacia la integración regional. Conscientes de los desafíos que ha generado la globalización y que se han evidenciado en las crisis económicas y políticas internacionales, check así como en la proliferación de actividades ilícitas transnacionales que traspasan las capacidades individuales de los Estados, algunos países han comenzado a entender que las ventajas de una mayor cooperación e intercambio comercial no son el objetivo final, sino que es necesario coordinar respuestas en políticas económicas y fiscales, pero también sociales, en manejo de recursos naturales, temas ambientales, de defensa y en otros ámbitos, para enfrentar las amenazas. Pero sobre todo, que en el mundo que se va configurando es imposible caminar solos, y es fundamental caminar en colectivo

Para reforzar la integración es necesario incrementar los niveles de interdependencia económica y comercial en la región. Es un camino complejo pero no imposible. Falta todavía profundizar en una mirada colectiva y dejar de mirarse cada uno al ombligo. Es necesario que las economías más grandes sean más solidarias con las economías pequeñas, pero también es fundamental que éstas busquen un desarrollo propio, dejen de ser parasitarias y no se escondan detrás la farsa de revender productos traídos de otros países sin incorporar agregado nacional o solo colocando una etiqueta de industria nacional.

De a poco América del Sur se va alejando de la teoría de integración regional que promueve el divorcio entre Economía y Política, y que terminó por arrastrar a muchos países a la falacia del “mercado auto regulador” como promotor del desarrollo. Sin embargo, es preocupante observar que después de las nefastas experiencias con la aplicación de la terapias de shock de mercado –en palabras de Naomi Klein-, este tipo de medidas políticas se siguen vendiendo desde algunos países de la OCDE, organizaciones financieras multilaterales, sectores políticos de derecha y ciertos empresarios, como la panacea para la proyección económica de nuestros países.

Desde el Norte se promueven los tratados de libre comercio y la liberalización y desregulación financiera, así como la privatización y la flexibilización del mercado de trabajo como los mecanismos fundamentales para la integración a la economía internacional. En América del Sur hay quienes escuchan esos cantos de sirena y defienden la necesidad urgente de crear un área de libre comercio estilo ALCA. Pretenden así reponer los fracasos del modelo neoliberal.

La integración regional de Suramérica debe recuperar el rol del Estado sobre el mercado, y de la sociedad sobre el Estado y el mercado. Los Estados Suramericanos integrados deben controlar el mercado suramericano integrado. Y la sociedad suramericana debe jugar un papel fundamental con su participación para controlar los Estados y los mercados integrados. Esa integración debe generar vías para un modelo de desarrollo que permita la proyección de cada país y la proyección conjunta. La eficacia y el aprovechamiento de las sinergias regionales dependen de la capacidad de entender que es un proyecto colectivo, no individual, y del tejido institucional que se consolide en el proceso de integración.

Fortalecer y profundizar la integración en América del Sur, pasa por fortalecer y profundizar Unasur, y en ese camino es fundamental fortalecer y profundizar el Mercosur caminando hacia un Mercosur Suramericano. Pero eso depende de la capacidad que muestren nuestros Estados para reconfigurar sus estructuras productivas. Esto será posible si los gobiernos van de a poco trascendiendo el ámbito de la mera racionalidad económica y se comprometen en la construcción de una Política Económica Común e Inclusiva, que aproveche las ventajas de la región en recursos alimenticios, hídricos, materias primas industriales y energéticas, generando una integración productiva y la complementariedad entre los países.

En el nuevo orden mundial, la importancia de América del Sur en la economía internacional es innegable. Es uno de los polos económicos más dinámicos. Actualmente, el PIB de los países de la Suramérica representa el 73 por ciento del de América Latina y el Caribe, que a su vez representa el 8 por ciento del comercio mundial. A pesar del peso económico, la matriz productiva y exportadora de nuestros países continúa centrada en el sector primario y en las manufacturas intensivas en materias primas y recursos naturales. Este fenómeno responde a los altos precios de los commodities en el mercado internacional, pero también a la concentración de la inversión, tanto nacional como extranjera, en la explotación de materias primas. Como consecuencia, los países suramericanos enfrentan la amenaza de la desindustrialización y reprimariziación de sus economías. Estos procesos conllevan el aparecimiento de enclaves productivos cuya generación de riqueza no se transmite al total de la economía, dadas las escasas concatenaciones productivas que generan y la fuga de capitales en forma de repatriación de ganancias y beneficios y de incremento desmedido de las importaciones. Esos enclaves, muchas veces son parte de la parasitaria inversión extranjera que no paga impuestos y aporta muy poco a nuestros países.

La forma independiente que los países suramericanos han concebido su desarrollo económico, ha dado origen al establecimiento de estructuras productivas orientadas a satisfacer solamente necesidades extra regionales, llevando a que la dinámica económica de los países de la región contribuya en poco o nada a la dinámica económica colectiva de la región. Debido a este modo individualista de concebir el crecimiento económico y de aplicar políticas comerciales fundamentadas en aperturismos indiscriminados, la mayor parte de las economías suramericanas han experimentado procesos de desmantelamiento productivo o pérdida de dinamismo económico en los sectores industriales. Paralelamente grandes segmentos de nuestras poblaciones ven disminuir el desempleo pero crecer el empleo precario. Y observan que, si bien se nota una clara disminución de la pobreza, la desigualdad se mantiene y a veces es más evidente.

Es necesario que la integración económica suramericana gire en torno a la articulación de las economías nacionales, que las estructuras productivas busquen satisfacer las necesidades de los habitantes de la región, de modo que podamos desarrollar nuestros sectores manufactureros y de servicios. En ese sentido se debe asegurar las condiciones jurídicas y técnicas para promover inversiones productivas regionales. Y finalmente hay que configurar ordenamientos productivos que contribuyan a que todas y cada una de las economías de la región alcancen niveles altos de competitividad para poder, en otra fase, competir en los mercados de servicios y manufacturas de mediano y alto valor agregado internacionales.

En el difícil camino hacia un Mercosur Suramericano, Mercosur debe transformarse en la cabeza de puente para formar un bloque comercial suramericano, que se rija por los principios de solidaridad, complementariedad y consideración de las asimetrías en los niveles de desarrollo económico y social de los diferentes miembros, que priorice el papel del Estado, que tenga como finalidad el bienestar de la población en lugar de las ganancias del gran capital, y que sirva como ejemplo de un modelo de regionalismo diferente, frente a los esquemas tradicionales que se basan en el fundamentalismo de mercado.

– Kintto Lucas es Embajador Itinerante de Uruguay para Unasur, Celac y Alba. Ex Vicecanciller de Ecuador.

Fuente: http://alainet.org/active/65704&lang=es

16 July by Eric Toussaint

 

Interview by Monique Van Dieren and Claudia Benedetto for Contrastes magazine |1|.

The EU and the Eurozone were created solely to favour capital and apply its principles: total liberty of movement for capital, more about
drugstore free circulation of goods and services, unrestricted commercial competition and the undermining of the very principle of public services, among others.

Capital is given a free rein to maximise its profits, wrongly supposing that if private initiative is favoured all will be well. In following this principle and in reducing state intervention to a minimum in terms of regulations and budgets, we now have a Europe which costs only 1% of its GDP whereas the budgets of the most industrialised countries are at about 40% to 50% of their GDP! This 1% is scrawny and nearly half of it goes to the Common Agricultural Policy. In consequence Europe has not developed the means to reduce the differences between its strongest economies and the others. When these economies are put onto the same playing field their differences are aggravated.

Are there other points of division?

Not only do we have opposition between, on the one hand, countries like Greece, Ireland , Portugal, Spain and the East European countries, and on the other hand, the strongest EU countries, but also inside each of these countries, where income disparities have increased following reforms of the labour markets.
The policies that have been applied by the EU member states have contributed to these inequalities. A prime example is Germany, where counter-reforms, that aim to create a greater variety of employment models, have been put into place. There are currently 7 million full time employees earning less than 400 euros a month!

Tax policy is known to be at the heart of the European problem and of the indebtedness of member states. How can the fact that most European countries are maintaining internal competition be explained?

Europe has refused fiscal harmonisation. The result is that there is enormous disparity between systems of taxation. In Cyprus, corporation tax is 10%. That should change with the present crisis. In Ireland corporation tax is 12.5% and in Belgium, 33.99%. These differences allow companies to declare their revenues where the tax bite is the least. Current European fiscal policy protects tax evasion. Tax havens exist within the European Union – notably the City of London – and the Eurozone, with the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg.

It is quite possible to implement measures of fiscal justice at a national level. The common belief that “being in the Eurozone it is impossible to apply major fiscal measures” is false. We are told there are no alternatives. Those who invoke these arguments are protecting the fraudsters. We can see that solutions previously considered impossible are being imagined in the “case” of Cyprus: bank deposits of over 100,000 euros are to be taxed; controls of capital movements are being put into place. I am against the plan imposed on Cyprus by the Troika because the goals are to impose global antisocial policies; but certain measures show the clear possibility of controlling capital flows and of greatly increasing tax-rates above a given level of wealth.
In spite of EU regulations, it is perfectly possible for countries to refuse the policies of the commission and impose renegotiations at the European level. Europe must be reconstructed democratically. In the meantime the left-wing governments must break ranks. If François Hollande really represented the will of the French people that elected him he would have insisted on renegotiating the European Fiscal Compact with Angela Merkel and if she refused he could have refused to vote it in. This would have prevented its adoption.

The euro crisis is clearly the result of an absence of sound political governance (lack of coherent economic, financial, fiscal and social policies). The lack of real European support for Greece in the face of its debt problems shows the fragility of a union that is not based on solidarity. Does this euro crisis toll the bell for European solidarity? Is the dream of European federalism dead and buried?

The EU as it exists has never hinged on solidarity, unless it be in favour of the big European companies. The European governments have continually applied measures that favour them and the European banks. When it comes to helping the weaker people and the weaker economies, there is no solidarity. One could say that there is one kind of solidarity: a class solidarity, a solidarity between capitalists.
Federalism is possible but it must be constituted by the peoples. Guy Verhofstadt and Daniel Cohn-Bendit advocate a federalism imposed from above. We need a federalism that arises from the will of the people.
Federation is possible and necessary, but that implies that the solution to the European crisis should come from the base. That does not mean a withdrawal behind national frontiers, but solidarity between European peoples and a European constitution decided by the people themselves.

What must be done to make the European institutions more democratic?

The existing non democratic institutions must be taken apart and replaced by new ones, created by a peoples’ constituent assembly! The legislative power (the European Parliament) is extremely weak, too much in the thrall of the Executive.

Awaiting this miracle remedy, do you have a concrete idea of how to reconcile Europe’s citizens with Europe?

Within national frontiers, initiatives must be taken by the social movements and corresponding left-wing organisations towards defining common objectives. At the European level, through the Alter Summit movement, we are trying to create a maximum of convergence between citizens’ movements, social movements and European trade unions |2|. It is not easy, up to now it has been too slow, but a coalition of European social movements must nevertheless be created. Relaunching the “Indignés” movement must be encouraged if it is possible, supporting Blockupy in Frankfurt against the ECB. |3| Also, feminist movements and actions against austerity programmes in Europe must be given all possible support
 |4|. Along with this, other European initiatives must be reinforced, such as the the European and Mediterranean citizens’ audits networks (ICAN) |5|, the European network against the privatisation of health services |6| and the efforts to create a European anti-fascist movement |7|, the ” European peoples against the Troika”, which organised actions in dozens of towns and cities across Europe on 1st June 2013 |8|.

Europe has a purpose because…
Solidarity between the peoples is necessary and undoubtedly possible.

Europe has a purpose on condition that…
The process comes from the people. A constituent assembly of the European peoples must found a completely new Europe!
It is time to abandon the dominant ideology that has reigned for so long. There are several possible ways to resolve the crisis. The austerity measures currently applied can only make it worse. We are facing 10 to 15 years of crisis and very limited growth. Unless, that is, the social movements manage to put structural reforms into place, such as the socialisation of the banks; the consolidation of public services; the reconstruction of a Europe based on a peoples’constituent assembly; a Europe in solidarity with the rest of the World. Illegitimate public debt must also be abolished by developing initiatives of citizens’ audits as is the case in Belgium today |9|. This solution presupposes that the social movements and the radical left are capable of proposing real alternatives, with a coherent programme that goes beyond neo-Keynesianism. I would be disappointed if this capitalist crisis were to achieve no more than slightly better discipline. Regulated green capitalism is not a solution to the fundamental problem of climate change. We must abolish the capitalist system.

Translated by Vickie Briault and Mike Krolikowski

Footnotes

|1| The original version of this interview (in French only) is available on the Equipes populaires website which publishes Contrastes magazine: http://www.equipespopulaires.be/sit…

This version has been especially adapted for the CADTM website www.cadtm.org

|2| See http://www.altersummit.eu/

|3| See (in French only) http://cadtm.org/Francfort-ein-zwei…

|4| See (in French only) http://cadtm.org/Femmes-d-Europe-en… and http://cadtm.org/Une-tres-prometteu…

|5| See http://www.citizen-audit.net/ and http://cadtm.org/Coordinated-effort… and cadtm.org/ICAN

|6| See (in French only) http://reseau-europeen-droit-sante…. and http://www.sante-solidarite.be/acti…

|7| See http://cadtm.org/For-a-European-ant…

|8| See http://cadtm.org/From-the-crisis-ed…

|9| See (in French only) http://cadtm.org/Declaration-pour-l…

 

Source: http://cadtm.org/Eric-Toussaint-The-EU-has-never

16 July by Eric Toussaint

 

Interview by Monique Van Dieren and Claudia Benedetto for Contrastes magazine |1|.

The EU and the Eurozone were created solely to favour capital and apply its principles: total liberty of movement for capital, remedy cialis free circulation of goods and services, cialis salve unrestricted commercial competition and the undermining of the very principle of public services, viagra among others.

Capital is given a free rein to maximise its profits, wrongly supposing that if private initiative is favoured all will be well. In following this principle and in reducing state intervention to a minimum in terms of regulations and budgets, we now have a Europe which costs only 1% of its GDP whereas the budgets of the most industrialised countries are at about 40% to 50% of their GDP! This 1% is scrawny and nearly half of it goes to the Common Agricultural Policy. In consequence Europe has not developed the means to reduce the differences between its strongest economies and the others. When these economies are put onto the same playing field their differences are aggravated.

Are there other points of division?

Not only do we have opposition between, on the one hand, countries like Greece, Ireland , Portugal, Spain and the East European countries, and on the other hand, the strongest EU countries, but also inside each of these countries, where income disparities have increased following reforms of the labour markets.
The policies that have been applied by the EU member states have contributed to these inequalities. A prime example is Germany, where counter-reforms, that aim to create a greater variety of employment models, have been put into place. There are currently 7 million full time employees earning less than 400 euros a month!

Tax policy is known to be at the heart of the European problem and of the indebtedness of member states. How can the fact that most European countries are maintaining internal competition be explained?

Europe has refused fiscal harmonisation. The result is that there is enormous disparity between systems of taxation. In Cyprus, corporation tax is 10%. That should change with the present crisis. In Ireland corporation tax is 12.5% and in Belgium, 33.99%. These differences allow companies to declare their revenues where the tax bite is the least. Current European fiscal policy protects tax evasion. Tax havens exist within the European Union – notably the City of London – and the Eurozone, with the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg.

It is quite possible to implement measures of fiscal justice at a national level. The common belief that “being in the Eurozone it is impossible to apply major fiscal measures” is false. We are told there are no alternatives. Those who invoke these arguments are protecting the fraudsters. We can see that solutions previously considered impossible are being imagined in the “case” of Cyprus: bank deposits of over 100,000 euros are to be taxed; controls of capital movements are being put into place. I am against the plan imposed on Cyprus by the Troika because the goals are to impose global antisocial policies; but certain measures show the clear possibility of controlling capital flows and of greatly increasing tax-rates above a given level of wealth.
In spite of EU regulations, it is perfectly possible for countries to refuse the policies of the commission and impose renegotiations at the European level. Europe must be reconstructed democratically. In the meantime the left-wing governments must break ranks. If François Hollande really represented the will of the French people that elected him he would have insisted on renegotiating the European Fiscal Compact with Angela Merkel and if she refused he could have refused to vote it in. This would have prevented its adoption.

The euro crisis is clearly the result of an absence of sound political governance (lack of coherent economic, financial, fiscal and social policies). The lack of real European support for Greece in the face of its debt problems shows the fragility of a union that is not based on solidarity. Does this euro crisis toll the bell for European solidarity? Is the dream of European federalism dead and buried?

The EU as it exists has never hinged on solidarity, unless it be in favour of the big European companies. The European governments have continually applied measures that favour them and the European banks. When it comes to helping the weaker people and the weaker economies, there is no solidarity. One could say that there is one kind of solidarity: a class solidarity, a solidarity between capitalists.
Federalism is possible but it must be constituted by the peoples. Guy Verhofstadt and Daniel Cohn-Bendit advocate a federalism imposed from above. We need a federalism that arises from the will of the people.
Federation is possible and necessary, but that implies that the solution to the European crisis should come from the base. That does not mean a withdrawal behind national frontiers, but solidarity between European peoples and a European constitution decided by the people themselves.

What must be done to make the European institutions more democratic?

The existing non democratic institutions must be taken apart and replaced by new ones, created by a peoples’ constituent assembly! The legislative power (the European Parliament) is extremely weak, too much in the thrall of the Executive.

Awaiting this miracle remedy, do you have a concrete idea of how to reconcile Europe’s citizens with Europe?

Within national frontiers, initiatives must be taken by the social movements and corresponding left-wing organisations towards defining common objectives. At the European level, through the Alter Summit movement, we are trying to create a maximum of convergence between citizens’ movements, social movements and European trade unions |2|. It is not easy, up to now it has been too slow, but a coalition of European social movements must nevertheless be created. Relaunching the “Indignés” movement must be encouraged if it is possible, supporting Blockupy in Frankfurt against the ECB. |3| Also, feminist movements and actions against austerity programmes in Europe must be given all possible support
 |4|. Along with this, other European initiatives must be reinforced, such as the the European and Mediterranean citizens’ audits networks (ICAN) |5|, the European network against the privatisation of health services |6| and the efforts to create a European anti-fascist movement |7|, the ” European peoples against the Troika”, which organised actions in dozens of towns and cities across Europe on 1st June 2013 |8|.

Europe has a purpose because…
Solidarity between the peoples is necessary and undoubtedly possible.

Europe has a purpose on condition that…
The process comes from the people. A constituent assembly of the European peoples must found a completely new Europe!
It is time to abandon the dominant ideology that has reigned for so long. There are several possible ways to resolve the crisis. The austerity measures currently applied can only make it worse. We are facing 10 to 15 years of crisis and very limited growth. Unless, that is, the social movements manage to put structural reforms into place, such as the socialisation of the banks; the consolidation of public services; the reconstruction of a Europe based on a peoples’constituent assembly; a Europe in solidarity with the rest of the World. Illegitimate public debt must also be abolished by developing initiatives of citizens’ audits as is the case in Belgium today |9|. This solution presupposes that the social movements and the radical left are capable of proposing real alternatives, with a coherent programme that goes beyond neo-Keynesianism. I would be disappointed if this capitalist crisis were to achieve no more than slightly better discipline. Regulated green capitalism is not a solution to the fundamental problem of climate change. We must abolish the capitalist system.

Translated by Vickie Briault and Mike Krolikowski

Footnotes

|1| The original version of this interview (in French only) is available on the Equipes populaires website which publishes Contrastes magazine: http://www.equipespopulaires.be/sit…

This version has been especially adapted for the CADTM website www.cadtm.org

|2| See http://www.altersummit.eu/

|3| See (in French only) http://cadtm.org/Francfort-ein-zwei…

|4| See (in French only) http://cadtm.org/Femmes-d-Europe-en… and http://cadtm.org/Une-tres-prometteu…

|5| See http://www.citizen-audit.net/ and http://cadtm.org/Coordinated-effort… and cadtm.org/ICAN

|6| See (in French only) http://reseau-europeen-droit-sante…. and http://www.sante-solidarite.be/acti…

|7| See http://cadtm.org/For-a-European-ant…

|8| See http://cadtm.org/From-the-crisis-ed…

|9| See (in French only) http://cadtm.org/Declaration-pour-l…

Raúl Zibechi

ALAI AMLATINA, prescription 18/06/2013.- Dos proyectos de asociación regional se enfrentan en América del Sur: la Alianza del Pacífico y la UNASUR. Ambas son incompatibles, responden a intereses geopolíticos opuestos que colocan a cada uno de los países de la región ante una disyuntiva. Ya no quedan espacios ni para ingenuidades ni para distracciones.

“Existe una cierta tendencia en nuestras perspectivas integracionistas a sobrecargar de ideología las lecturas sobre los diferentes proyectos subregionales”, escribió Carlos Chacho Álvarez, secretario general de Aladi (Tiempo Argentino, 2 de junio de 2013). Por esa razón considera que contraponer la Alianza del Pacífico al Mercosur ampliado, “resulta claramente un signo negativo, cuando no un retroceso”. De todos modos, Álvarez apuesta por la Unasur y la Celac “como los dos proyectos más ambiciosos e integrales de la región”, que al excluir a Estados Unidos y Canadá enseñan también su costado ideológico. (1)

“El continente se dividió”, apunta el ex presidente de Brasil Fernando Henrique Cardoso en referencia al nacimiento de la Alianza del Pacífico (Valor, 30 de noviembre de 2012). “De alguna manera perdemos nuestra relevancia política en el continente que era incontestable”, añade. Cardoso cree que la salida para su país es “una negociación a fondo con los Estados Unidos”, a la que “siempre tuvimos miedo”.

Deslizándose por encima de los dos bloques, el presidente peruano Ollanta Humala recibió a principios de junio a Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, en el marco del foro “10 Años de la Alianza Estratégica Brasil-Perú 2003-2013”, y señaló que en diez años “se ha avanzado mucho en la integración peruano-brasileña y sobre todo en el entendimiento de que es una alianza natural para poder integrar un bloque bioceánico Atlántico-Pacífico” (La Voz de Rusia, 6 de junio de 2013).

En el mismo acto Lula recordó que una década atrás fue muy criticado en su país por firmar el acuerdo de integración con Perú, pues las elites brasileñas consideran que sólo se alcanzaría el desarrollo en base a relaciones comerciales con Estados Unidos y la Unión Europea: “América del Sur no existía, ni América Latina, no existía África ni los países árabes, yo creía que se podía cambiar la geografía comercial y política del mundo si creíamos en nosotros mismos, pero no era un discurso fácil”, sentenció el ex presidente.

Lula apoyó su discurso en datos irrefutables: el comercio bilateral pasó de 650 millones de dólares en 2003 a 3.700 millones en 2012. Las inversiones privadas brasileñas en Perú ascienden a 6.000 millones de dólares y lanzó el desafío de exportar productos industriales y con elevada composición tecnológica con el objetivo de que ambas economías “puedan complementarse”. Conscientemente abordó el punto clave de cualquier proceso serio de integración.

Los TLC hilvanados

La Alianza del Pacífico nació en abril de 2001 con la “Declaración de Lima”, iniciativa del entonces presidente Alan García, entre cuatro países que tienen Tratados de Libre Comercio con Estados Unidos: México, Colombia, Perú y Chile. El 6 de junio de 2012 se firmó el “Acuerdo Marco de Antofagasta” por los presidentes Sebastián Piñera, Juan Manuel Santos, Humala y Felipe Calderón. Panamá y Costa Rica fueron los primeros miembros observadores, a los que luego se sumaron España, Australia, Canadá, Nueva Zelanda y Uruguay, y en las siguientes cumbres se incorporaron Ecuador, El Salvador, Francia, Japón, Honduras, Paraguay, Portugal y República Dominicana.

Los defensores de la Alianza suelen decir que los cuatro países que la integran suman 200 millones de habitantes, representan el 55 por ciento de las exportaciones latinoamericanas y el 40 por ciento del PIB de la región. Dos destacados economistas de la región, el peruano Oscar Ugarteche y el brasileño José Luis Fiori, coinciden en analizar los procesos regionales como si fueran un juego de ajedrez, en el que la movida de una pieza por uno de los jugadores debe ir acompañada de una respuesta del otro contendiente adecuada al desafío recibido. Cuando se produjo el “golpe constitucional” que apartó a Fernando Lugo del gobierno, Paraguay fue separado del Mercosur y se le dio el ingreso a Venezuela. Del mismo modo debe interpretarse la creación de la Alianza del Pacífico: una respuesta a la creación de la Unasur encabezada por Brasil.

Cuando se formó la Alianza, Ugarteche sostuvo: “Los tres gobiernos sudamericanos del grupo (Chile, Colombia y Perú) tienen en común no haber firmado el acta de constitución del Banco del Sur, no tener acuerdos comerciales con el Mercosur vigentes, son observadores, tener TLCs firmados con Estados Unidos que aseguran arancel cero, lo que impide el acuerdo con el Mercosur cuyo piso es 5 por ciento, y carecer de un sector industrial nacional significativo” (Alai, 26 de abril de 2011). Su conclusión era que la Alianza es “un contrapeso a la influencia brasileña en Sudamérica” que “sirve no para competir sino para bloquear”.

Sin embargo, en un reciente artículo el economista sostiene que en los últimos tiempos “quien ha realizado los mejores movimientos ha sido sin duda la Alianza del Pacífico”, no tanto por sus propios méritos como por el notable estancamiento del Mercosur por el atasco en las relaciones entre Buenos Aires y Brasilia (Alai, 24 de abril de 2013). Entre esos avances figura el acercamiento del Paraguay pos Lugo. Así y todo, la Alianza debe sortear numerosas dificultades entre las que destacan la oposición de sectores del empresariado colombiano a un acuerdo que no les genera nuevas oportunidades sino “un detrimento de la balanza comercial y del empleo”.

Las dificultades de la integración

Los datos sobre inversión extranjera directa (IED) pueden tomarse como una radiografía de la región. La IED ha escalado de forma exponencial en América del Sur, pasando de poco más de 30.000 millones de dólares anuales en los primeros años de la década de 2000 a 143.000 millones en 2012. Se multiplicó por más de cinco, según el último informe de la CEPAL. (2)

Vale la pena destacar que los tres países andinos de la Alianza del Pacífico pasaron de recibir una IED de 11.000 millones de dólares al comenzar el siglo a percibir 58.000 millones. El mayor crecimiento de la región. Pero lo que revela el carácter de las economías nacionales es el sector al que se dirigen.

Chile es el segundo país en volumen de IED, con 30.000 millones de dólares en 2012, pero la mitad se invierte en la minería (49 por ciento) y un quinto en el sector financiero. Colombia recibió una IED de 15.800 millones de dólares, pero más de la mitad van a petróleo y minería. En Perú, que recibió 12.200 millones, sólo la minería absorbe bastante más de la mitad de las inversiones (quizá el 70 por ciento, aunque no hay datos).

En Brasil la relación es justamente la inversa: la industria manufacturera absorbe alrededor del 40 por ciento de las inversiones (decayendo del 47 a 38 por ciento en los últimos años) mientras las actividades extractivas concentran apenas el 13 por ciento. Esto quiere decir que el grueso de la inversión extranjera, de 66.000 millones de dólares (la cuarta del mundo luego de Estados Unidos, China y Hong Kong), se dirige a sectores que generan puestos de trabajo calificados y agregan valor a la producción.

Argentina tiene una situación intermedia entre Brasil y los países andinos. Luego de una década de fuerte retracción, la IED hacia Argentina creció un 27 por ciento en 2012 hasta alcanzar 12.500 millones de dólares. A fines de 2011 la composición sectorial de la IED acumulada en Argentina estaba concentrada en un 44 por ciento en la industria y un 30 por ciento en servicios.

Es cierto que toda la región sufre un proceso de desindustrialización como consecuencia de la competencia china. Pero los efectos son dispares: en algunos casos la dependencia de los bienes naturales es apabullante, convirtiendo a esos países en absolutamente dependientes de los precios de las commodities en las bolsas de valores y, muy en particular, de la evolución del mercado chino. Es posible que la mentada pujanza de la Alianza del Pacífico sea poco más que humo y se evapore cuando esos precios caigan.

Chile no es capaz de absorber productivamente los enormes flujos de IDE que recibe, toda vez que el 26% son reinvertidos inmediatamente fuera del país por las subsidiarias chilenas de empresas extranjeras. La CEPAL concluye que el país andino, colocado como modelo a seguir por buena parte de los economistas de la región, es apenas “una puerta de entrada para otros mercados latinoamericanos”.

Según Fiori los tres países sudamericanos de la Alianza del Pacífico “son pequeñas o medianas economías costeras y de exportación, con escasísimo relacionamiento comercial entre sí, o con México”. El único país que tiene clima templado y tierras productivas, Chile, “es casi irrelevante para la economía sudamericana, además de ser uno de los países más aislados del mundo”, dice el economista brasileño.

Cree que la Alianza del Pacífico no tiene un futuro promisorio. Sus exportaciones son mayores que las del Mercosur, pero el comercio intrazona es ínfimo (dos por ciento del total exportado frente al 13 por ciento del Mercosur). En rigor, es una alianza comercial que no busca la integración.

El problema no radica tanto en las virtudes de la Alianza sino en los problemas que atraviesa el Mercosur. Por un lado, los cuatro países que lo crearon (Argentina, Brasil, Paraguay y Uruguay) exportan los mismos productos (básicamente soja y carne) a los mismos mercados. Con esa estructura de exportaciones no hay integración posible, que sólo puede forjarse sobre la base de la complementación productiva. Como apunta Fiori, desde la crisis de 2008 y a caballo de la expansión china, se han profundizado las características seculares de las economías sudamericanas que obstaculizan cualquier proyecto de integración: “El hecho de ser una sumatoria de economías primario-exportadoras paralelas y orientadas por los mercados externos” (Pontes, febrero 2013).

Por otro, y estrechamente ligado a lo anterior, la permanente disputa entre Brasil y Argentina por sus exportaciones industriales (automotriz y de electrodomésticos) está empantanando la alianza regional. Cada producto argentino que ingresa en Brasil, le hace perder puestos de trabajo, y viceversa. Los acuerdos comerciales existentes y la opción por la integración aún no se tradujeron en la creación de industrias capaces de complementarse.

En su balance de la inversión extranjera en 2012, la Cepal no deja lugar a dudas: “En América del Sur (sin incluir a Brasil), se ha ido profundizando un patrón de distribución de la IED en el cual los sectores basados en recursos naturales son claramente el primer destino”. La minería absorbió el 51 por ciento de las inversiones en la región, servicios el 37 y la industria apenas el 12 por ciento.

Hora de elegir

“Se puede decir con toda certeza que el ´cisma del Pacífico´ tiene más importancia ideológica que económica en América del Sur y sería casi insignificante políticamente si no se tratara de una pequeña franja del proyecto de Obama de crear una Asociación Transpacífico (TPP por sus siglas en inglés), pieza central de su política de reafirmación del poder económico y militar en la región del Pacífico”, señala Fiori (Pontes, febrero de 2013).

Este es quizá el nudo de la cuestión. México es ya una pieza inseparable de la economía estadounidense. Luego de la crisis de 2008, que le impone serias restricciones presupuestales, la estrategia de los Estados Unidos consiste en “tercerizar” la administración de su poder global pero con el cuidado de impedir que surjan potencias regionales que amenacen su posición y en particular el predominio aéreo y naval. A través del sistema financiero, razona Fiori, la superpotencia sigue traspasando sus costos y sus crisis a terceros países, como sucedió con su principal aliado, la Unión Europea, manteniendo en tanto el “control monopólico de la innovación tecnológica”.

Ante este panorama, lo decisivo serán las opciones de los demás países, sobre todo el rumbo que adopte Brasil. El profesor Ricardo Sennes, analista internacional de la Universidad de Sao Paulo, sostiene que el crecimiento económico pos 2002 “profundizó las divergencias entre las estrategias económicas de los países, así como se ampliaron las asimetrías entre Brasil y los países de la región” (3).

A esta dificultad estructural se suma que en Brasil prevalece “la preferencia por un patrón de relación regional basado en la proyección de las capacidades políticas brasileñas y no en un patrón de integración regional”. No es lo mismo la densificación de los negocios que una estrategia de integración. En su opinión eso debe a que existe una débil “coalición interna” a favor de la integración y se traduce en un elevado activismo diplomático que contrasta con la baja institucionalidad de la integración. En conclusión, “la regionalización, aumento de las relaciones regionales no derivadas de política y acuerdos entre estados, avanzó más rápida y profundamente que la integración regional”.

Eso se manifiesta en que los miembros del Mercosur han establecido acuerdos más profundos con países de fuera de esta alianza que entre ellos mismos. Sennes concluye que más allá de las declaraciones, “el proyecto regional de Brasil no integra el eje central de su estrategia internacional”. Suena fuerte, pero en modo alguno parece alejado de la realidad. En su apoyo, resume: preferencia por reuniones de cúpula antes que acuerdos institucionales; “integración económica rasa”, o sea focalizada en cuestiones comerciales bilaterales en detrimento de la integración productiva, financiera y logística; privilegiar agencias de crédito domésticas como el BNDES en vez de regionales; y apoyar las iniciativas privadas de inversiones en detrimento de acuerdos regionales de promoción de inversiones.

A partir de este cúmulo de dificultades, Fiori plantea una disyuntiva de hierro. Que Brasil y la región se conviertan en “periferia de lujo” de las grandes potencias, como ya fueron Australia y Canadá, con acuerdos de “socios preferenciales”, en línea con la propuesta de Cardoso y de las elites de cada país, atornillados al papel de exportadores de commodities. O bien emprender un camino alternativo, asentado en la autosuficiencia energética y los recursos naturales estratégicos, combinando “una industria de alto valor agregado como un sector productor de alimentos y commodities de alta productividad”, que no renuncie a la complementariedad y competitividad con Estados Unidos pero que “luche para aumentar su capacidad de decisión estratégica autónoma” (“Brasil e América do Sul: o desafío da inserçâo internacional soberana”, Brasilia, CEPAL/IPEA, 2011).

Las elites han hecho su opción y pelean por ella. La Confederación Nacional de la Industria (CNI) y la Federación de las Industrias del Estado de San Pablo rechazan cada vez con mayor vigor el Mercosur y ni siquiera toman en cuenta la Unasur. Aecio Neves, candidato por el Partido de la Social Democracia que representa a esos sectores, habla claro: “Tenemos que tener el coraje de repensar y revisar el Mercosur. En este sentido, la Alianza del Pacífico, es un ejemplo ya de movilidad y dinamismo” (La Nación, 9 de junio de 2013).

Esa claridad contrasta con las nebulosas y contradictorias posiciones del progresismo. En el actual panorama global, no hay lugar para la neutralidad. “Los que se consideran neutros son siempre países irrelevantes o que acaban sucumbiendo”, concluye Fiori. Por eso sostiene que la región debería construirse como “un grupo de países aliados capaces de decir no, cuando sea necesario, y capaces de defenderse, cuando sea inevitable”.

Notas

1) Aladi: Asociación Latinoamericana de Integración. Unasur: Unión de Naciones Suramericanas. Celac: Comunidad de Estados Latinoamericanos y Caribeños.
2) La Inversión Extranjera Directa en América Latina y el Caribe 2012”, Santiago, 2013.
3) Revista “Tempo do Mundo”, Vol. 3, No. 2, Brasilia, diciembre 2012.

– Raúl Zibechi, periodista uruguayo, escribe en Brecha y La Jornada y es colaborador de ALAI.

Fuente: http://alainet.org/active/64852&lang=es

Raúl Zibechi

ALAI AMLATINA, generic 18/06/2013.- Dos proyectos de asociación regional se enfrentan en América del Sur: la Alianza del Pacífico y la UNASUR. Ambas son incompatibles, drugstore responden a intereses geopolíticos opuestos que colocan a cada uno de los países de la región ante una disyuntiva. Ya no quedan espacios ni para ingenuidades ni para distracciones.

“Existe una cierta tendencia en nuestras perspectivas integracionistas a sobrecargar de ideología las lecturas sobre los diferentes proyectos subregionales”, prostate
escribió Carlos Chacho Álvarez, secretario general de Aladi (Tiempo Argentino, 2 de junio de 2013). Por esa razón considera que contraponer la Alianza del Pacífico al Mercosur ampliado, “resulta claramente un signo negativo, cuando no un retroceso”. De todos modos, Álvarez apuesta por la Unasur y la Celac “como los dos proyectos más ambiciosos e integrales de la región”, que al excluir a Estados Unidos y Canadá enseñan también su costado ideológico. (1)

“El continente se dividió”, apunta el ex presidente de Brasil Fernando Henrique Cardoso en referencia al nacimiento de la Alianza del Pacífico (Valor, 30 de noviembre de 2012). “De alguna manera perdemos nuestra relevancia política en el continente que era incontestable”, añade. Cardoso cree que la salida para su país es “una negociación a fondo con los Estados Unidos”, a la que “siempre tuvimos miedo”.

Deslizándose por encima de los dos bloques, el presidente peruano Ollanta Humala recibió a principios de junio a Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, en el marco del foro “10 Años de la Alianza Estratégica Brasil-Perú 2003-2013”, y señaló que en diez años “se ha avanzado mucho en la integración peruano-brasileña y sobre todo en el entendimiento de que es una alianza natural para poder integrar un bloque bioceánico Atlántico-Pacífico” (La Voz de Rusia, 6 de junio de 2013).

En el mismo acto Lula recordó que una década atrás fue muy criticado en su país por firmar el acuerdo de integración con Perú, pues las elites brasileñas consideran que sólo se alcanzaría el desarrollo en base a relaciones comerciales con Estados Unidos y la Unión Europea: “América del Sur no existía, ni América Latina, no existía África ni los países árabes, yo creía que se podía cambiar la geografía comercial y política del mundo si creíamos en nosotros mismos, pero no era un discurso fácil”, sentenció el ex presidente.

Lula apoyó su discurso en datos irrefutables: el comercio bilateral pasó de 650 millones de dólares en 2003 a 3.700 millones en 2012. Las inversiones privadas brasileñas en Perú ascienden a 6.000 millones de dólares y lanzó el desafío de exportar productos industriales y con elevada composición tecnológica con el objetivo de que ambas economías “puedan complementarse”. Conscientemente abordó el punto clave de cualquier proceso serio de integración.

Los TLC hilvanados

La Alianza del Pacífico nació en abril de 2001 con la “Declaración de Lima”, iniciativa del entonces presidente Alan García, entre cuatro países que tienen Tratados de Libre Comercio con Estados Unidos: México, Colombia, Perú y Chile. El 6 de junio de 2012 se firmó el “Acuerdo Marco de Antofagasta” por los presidentes Sebastián Piñera, Juan Manuel Santos, Humala y Felipe Calderón. Panamá y Costa Rica fueron los primeros miembros observadores, a los que luego se sumaron España, Australia, Canadá, Nueva Zelanda y Uruguay, y en las siguientes cumbres se incorporaron Ecuador, El Salvador, Francia, Japón, Honduras, Paraguay, Portugal y República Dominicana.

Los defensores de la Alianza suelen decir que los cuatro países que la integran suman 200 millones de habitantes, representan el 55 por ciento de las exportaciones latinoamericanas y el 40 por ciento del PIB de la región. Dos destacados economistas de la región, el peruano Oscar Ugarteche y el brasileño José Luis Fiori, coinciden en analizar los procesos regionales como si fueran un juego de ajedrez, en el que la movida de una pieza por uno de los jugadores debe ir acompañada de una respuesta del otro contendiente adecuada al desafío recibido. Cuando se produjo el “golpe constitucional” que apartó a Fernando Lugo del gobierno, Paraguay fue separado del Mercosur y se le dio el ingreso a Venezuela. Del mismo modo debe interpretarse la creación de la Alianza del Pacífico: una respuesta a la creación de la Unasur encabezada por Brasil.

Cuando se formó la Alianza, Ugarteche sostuvo: “Los tres gobiernos sudamericanos del grupo (Chile, Colombia y Perú) tienen en común no haber firmado el acta de constitución del Banco del Sur, no tener acuerdos comerciales con el Mercosur vigentes, son observadores, tener TLCs firmados con Estados Unidos que aseguran arancel cero, lo que impide el acuerdo con el Mercosur cuyo piso es 5 por ciento, y carecer de un sector industrial nacional significativo” (Alai, 26 de abril de 2011). Su conclusión era que la Alianza es “un contrapeso a la influencia brasileña en Sudamérica” que “sirve no para competir sino para bloquear”.

Sin embargo, en un reciente artículo el economista sostiene que en los últimos tiempos “quien ha realizado los mejores movimientos ha sido sin duda la Alianza del Pacífico”, no tanto por sus propios méritos como por el notable estancamiento del Mercosur por el atasco en las relaciones entre Buenos Aires y Brasilia (Alai, 24 de abril de 2013). Entre esos avances figura el acercamiento del Paraguay pos Lugo. Así y todo, la Alianza debe sortear numerosas dificultades entre las que destacan la oposición de sectores del empresariado colombiano a un acuerdo que no les genera nuevas oportunidades sino “un detrimento de la balanza comercial y del empleo”.

Las dificultades de la integración

Los datos sobre inversión extranjera directa (IED) pueden tomarse como una radiografía de la región. La IED ha escalado de forma exponencial en América del Sur, pasando de poco más de 30.000 millones de dólares anuales en los primeros años de la década de 2000 a 143.000 millones en 2012. Se multiplicó por más de cinco, según el último informe de la CEPAL. (2)

Vale la pena destacar que los tres países andinos de la Alianza del Pacífico pasaron de recibir una IED de 11.000 millones de dólares al comenzar el siglo a percibir 58.000 millones. El mayor crecimiento de la región. Pero lo que revela el carácter de las economías nacionales es el sector al que se dirigen.

Chile es el segundo país en volumen de IED, con 30.000 millones de dólares en 2012, pero la mitad se invierte en la minería (49 por ciento) y un quinto en el sector financiero. Colombia recibió una IED de 15.800 millones de dólares, pero más de la mitad van a petróleo y minería. En Perú, que recibió 12.200 millones, sólo la minería absorbe bastante más de la mitad de las inversiones (quizá el 70 por ciento, aunque no hay datos).

En Brasil la relación es justamente la inversa: la industria manufacturera absorbe alrededor del 40 por ciento de las inversiones (decayendo del 47 a 38 por ciento en los últimos años) mientras las actividades extractivas concentran apenas el 13 por ciento. Esto quiere decir que el grueso de la inversión extranjera, de 66.000 millones de dólares (la cuarta del mundo luego de Estados Unidos, China y Hong Kong), se dirige a sectores que generan puestos de trabajo calificados y agregan valor a la producción.

Argentina tiene una situación intermedia entre Brasil y los países andinos. Luego de una década de fuerte retracción, la IED hacia Argentina creció un 27 por ciento en 2012 hasta alcanzar 12.500 millones de dólares. A fines de 2011 la composición sectorial de la IED acumulada en Argentina estaba concentrada en un 44 por ciento en la industria y un 30 por ciento en servicios.

Es cierto que toda la región sufre un proceso de desindustrialización como consecuencia de la competencia china. Pero los efectos son dispares: en algunos casos la dependencia de los bienes naturales es apabullante, convirtiendo a esos países en absolutamente dependientes de los precios de las commodities en las bolsas de valores y, muy en particular, de la evolución del mercado chino. Es posible que la mentada pujanza de la Alianza del Pacífico sea poco más que humo y se evapore cuando esos precios caigan.

Chile no es capaz de absorber productivamente los enormes flujos de IDE que recibe, toda vez que el 26% son reinvertidos inmediatamente fuera del país por las subsidiarias chilenas de empresas extranjeras. La CEPAL concluye que el país andino, colocado como modelo a seguir por buena parte de los economistas de la región, es apenas “una puerta de entrada para otros mercados latinoamericanos”.

Según Fiori los tres países sudamericanos de la Alianza del Pacífico “son pequeñas o medianas economías costeras y de exportación, con escasísimo relacionamiento comercial entre sí, o con México”. El único país que tiene clima templado y tierras productivas, Chile, “es casi irrelevante para la economía sudamericana, además de ser uno de los países más aislados del mundo”, dice el economista brasileño.

Cree que la Alianza del Pacífico no tiene un futuro promisorio. Sus exportaciones son mayores que las del Mercosur, pero el comercio intrazona es ínfimo (dos por ciento del total exportado frente al 13 por ciento del Mercosur). En rigor, es una alianza comercial que no busca la integración.

El problema no radica tanto en las virtudes de la Alianza sino en los problemas que atraviesa el Mercosur. Por un lado, los cuatro países que lo crearon (Argentina, Brasil, Paraguay y Uruguay) exportan los mismos productos (básicamente soja y carne) a los mismos mercados. Con esa estructura de exportaciones no hay integración posible, que sólo puede forjarse sobre la base de la complementación productiva. Como apunta Fiori, desde la crisis de 2008 y a caballo de la expansión china, se han profundizado las características seculares de las economías sudamericanas que obstaculizan cualquier proyecto de integración: “El hecho de ser una sumatoria de economías primario-exportadoras paralelas y orientadas por los mercados externos” (Pontes, febrero 2013).

Por otro, y estrechamente ligado a lo anterior, la permanente disputa entre Brasil y Argentina por sus exportaciones industriales (automotriz y de electrodomésticos) está empantanando la alianza regional. Cada producto argentino que ingresa en Brasil, le hace perder puestos de trabajo, y viceversa. Los acuerdos comerciales existentes y la opción por la integración aún no se tradujeron en la creación de industrias capaces de complementarse.

En su balance de la inversión extranjera en 2012, la Cepal no deja lugar a dudas: “En América del Sur (sin incluir a Brasil), se ha ido profundizando un patrón de distribución de la IED en el cual los sectores basados en recursos naturales son claramente el primer destino”. La minería absorbió el 51 por ciento de las inversiones en la región, servicios el 37 y la industria apenas el 12 por ciento.

Hora de elegir

“Se puede decir con toda certeza que el ´cisma del Pacífico´ tiene más importancia ideológica que económica en América del Sur y sería casi insignificante políticamente si no se tratara de una pequeña franja del proyecto de Obama de crear una Asociación Transpacífico (TPP por sus siglas en inglés), pieza central de su política de reafirmación del poder económico y militar en la región del Pacífico”, señala Fiori (Pontes, febrero de 2013).

Este es quizá el nudo de la cuestión. México es ya una pieza inseparable de la economía estadounidense. Luego de la crisis de 2008, que le impone serias restricciones presupuestales, la estrategia de los Estados Unidos consiste en “tercerizar” la administración de su poder global pero con el cuidado de impedir que surjan potencias regionales que amenacen su posición y en particular el predominio aéreo y naval. A través del sistema financiero, razona Fiori, la superpotencia sigue traspasando sus costos y sus crisis a terceros países, como sucedió con su principal aliado, la Unión Europea, manteniendo en tanto el “control monopólico de la innovación tecnológica”.

Ante este panorama, lo decisivo serán las opciones de los demás países, sobre todo el rumbo que adopte Brasil. El profesor Ricardo Sennes, analista internacional de la Universidad de Sao Paulo, sostiene que el crecimiento económico pos 2002 “profundizó las divergencias entre las estrategias económicas de los países, así como se ampliaron las asimetrías entre Brasil y los países de la región” (3).

A esta dificultad estructural se suma que en Brasil prevalece “la preferencia por un patrón de relación regional basado en la proyección de las capacidades políticas brasileñas y no en un patrón de integración regional”. No es lo mismo la densificación de los negocios que una estrategia de integración. En su opinión eso debe a que existe una débil “coalición interna” a favor de la integración y se traduce en un elevado activismo diplomático que contrasta con la baja institucionalidad de la integración. En conclusión, “la regionalización, aumento de las relaciones regionales no derivadas de política y acuerdos entre estados, avanzó más rápida y profundamente que la integración regional”.

Eso se manifiesta en que los miembros del Mercosur han establecido acuerdos más profundos con países de fuera de esta alianza que entre ellos mismos. Sennes concluye que más allá de las declaraciones, “el proyecto regional de Brasil no integra el eje central de su estrategia internacional”. Suena fuerte, pero en modo alguno parece alejado de la realidad. En su apoyo, resume: preferencia por reuniones de cúpula antes que acuerdos institucionales; “integración económica rasa”, o sea focalizada en cuestiones comerciales bilaterales en detrimento de la integración productiva, financiera y logística; privilegiar agencias de crédito domésticas como el BNDES en vez de regionales; y apoyar las iniciativas privadas de inversiones en detrimento de acuerdos regionales de promoción de inversiones.

A partir de este cúmulo de dificultades, Fiori plantea una disyuntiva de hierro. Que Brasil y la región se conviertan en “periferia de lujo” de las grandes potencias, como ya fueron Australia y Canadá, con acuerdos de “socios preferenciales”, en línea con la propuesta de Cardoso y de las elites de cada país, atornillados al papel de exportadores de commodities. O bien emprender un camino alternativo, asentado en la autosuficiencia energética y los recursos naturales estratégicos, combinando “una industria de alto valor agregado como un sector productor de alimentos y commodities de alta productividad”, que no renuncie a la complementariedad y competitividad con Estados Unidos pero que “luche para aumentar su capacidad de decisión estratégica autónoma” (“Brasil e América do Sul: o desafío da inserçâo internacional soberana”, Brasilia, CEPAL/IPEA, 2011).

Las elites han hecho su opción y pelean por ella. La Confederación Nacional de la Industria (CNI) y la Federación de las Industrias del Estado de San Pablo rechazan cada vez con mayor vigor el Mercosur y ni siquiera toman en cuenta la Unasur. Aecio Neves, candidato por el Partido de la Social Democracia que representa a esos sectores, habla claro: “Tenemos que tener el coraje de repensar y revisar el Mercosur. En este sentido, la Alianza del Pacífico, es un ejemplo ya de movilidad y dinamismo” (La Nación, 9 de junio de 2013).

Esa claridad contrasta con las nebulosas y contradictorias posiciones del progresismo. En el actual panorama global, no hay lugar para la neutralidad. “Los que se consideran neutros son siempre países irrelevantes o que acaban sucumbiendo”, concluye Fiori. Por eso sostiene que la región debería construirse como “un grupo de países aliados capaces de decir no, cuando sea necesario, y capaces de defenderse, cuando sea inevitable”.

Notas

1) Aladi: Asociación Latinoamericana de Integración. Unasur: Unión de Naciones Suramericanas. Celac: Comunidad de Estados Latinoamericanos y Caribeños.
2) La Inversión Extranjera Directa en América Latina y el Caribe 2012”, Santiago, 2013.
3) Revista “Tempo do Mundo”, Vol. 3, No. 2, Brasilia, diciembre 2012.

– Raúl Zibechi, periodista uruguayo, escribe en Brecha y La Jornada y es colaborador de ALAI.

Fuente: http://alainet.org/active/64852&lang=es

La publicación presenta formas alternativas de Cooperación Financiera Sur-Sur, viagra a partir de la propuesta de una Nueva Arquitectura Financiera Regional (NAFR) en Sudamérica. Dentro de un exacerbado proceso de financierización de la producción y en el escenario de crisis global del sistema capitalista, pills la NAFR se transforma en una necesidad y una alternativa para dar camino a las transformaciones no solo de superación de las enormes desigualdades como también de apuntar hacia una transformación más amplia del modelo productivo tradicional, decease anclado en la exportación de materias primas y recursos naturales.

 

INDICE

Introducción, Graciela Rodriguez
La Nueva Arquitectura financiera regional en el contexto latinoamericano, Tomas Raffo y Gonzalo Bernat
La Arquitectura financiera internacional y la reconfiguración de las IFIs pos-2008, Diana Aguiar
Aspectos de la regionalización financiera: una mirada desde América Latina, Oscar Ugarteche
Integraciones y Desintegraciones en curso: los dilemas del sur de América, Carlos Bedoya
La integración posible, Graciela Rodríguez

 

Publicado en Diciembre 2012 por:

Instituto Eqüit – Gênero, Economia e Cidadania Global y Transnational Institute – TNI, en el marco de la Iniciativa Agenda de los Pueblos para Regionalismos Alternativos

DESCARAR REPORTE COMPLETO